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Aseram
27-07-2015, 23:38
My almost 7-year old found my WH stuff sitting in the garage a while back and is really interested in it. He always wants to look at the models and books and wants to paint stuff and have battles.

On one hand, it's cool to see him so excited about it as I have a lot of fond memories of when I was a 9 year old reading the 3rd edition book but I wonder if he is too young to grasp it and I'm not sure I want to expose him to some of the material which can be pretty dark in some instances.

What do you guys think? Anyone with kids who went through something similar with any advice? I think it could be a fun hobby for the both of us but I also don't want to start too soon if it will cause frustration (for me as well as him). I have plenty of hobbies and sports we can spend time on so it won't be too hard to steer him towards something else if he isn't ready for Warhammer.

The Anarchist
28-07-2015, 00:10
7 years old might be easier starting him on AoS or the original LotR rules from game as they are more child friendly and lil easier to grasp. full rules Warhammer 7th or 8th edition is probably a bit heavy rules wise for a kid

scruffyryan
28-07-2015, 01:01
Play games with him and teach him as he goes, he's your kid, you know better than us what he can and cant handle. do basic small unit stuff first and build up to the more complicated things.

swordofglass
28-07-2015, 01:27
All joking aside, maybe steer clear of Age of Sigmar - it's a bit too simple for 7-year olds.

HurrDurr
28-07-2015, 02:44
All joking aside, maybe steer clear of Age of Sigmar - it's a bit too simple for 7-year olds.

LOL This, this just got added to my sig.

Rolo Ramone
28-07-2015, 04:53
I been trying the game with my daughter for some time (she is 6 now). I always let her help me with the models. At first, just let her move the models over the table, but this year we start to play a game with dices. Just a few miniatures with no hard rules. The idea was to teach her how to move, how to enter in combat and how to roll the dices.

Her side has just 4 miniatures, She chose the models and all of them are characters (she picked a elf archer, a gnome girl from reaper miniatures, a dwarf longbeard and a female warrior from reaper too). The stats are no that important, she just want to know how many wounds the models have and the numbers she needs on the dices. My side has rats, goblins, spiders and every model I can think she would like to beat. Even we put some animal companions on the board so she can found them.

It's not Warhammer, she always win (some days is easier for her, some days is harder), but we enjoy it and I believe that some day we will be playing a more complex game, but the true is that at this time, it doesn't even matter to me.

de Selby
28-07-2015, 05:34
It's not Warhammer, she always win (some days is easier for her, some days is harder), but we enjoy it and I believe that some day we will be playing a more complex game, but the true is that at this time, it doesn't even matter to me.

Aww. Animal pets as objective markers. I declare this: CUTEHAMMER!

And I think Warhammer:Age of Sigmar is perfect for the OP. All the rules you need for your old models are free.

Pacman
28-07-2015, 14:48
Start with Mordheim. It's a lot simpler than full-on fantasy battles and the games are shorter. Plus they'll get to see their warband growing and improving, which gives it some narrative. Try picking up old copies of Town Cryer, there are loads of notes on scenarios and campaigns in it.

You might want to take a look at Frostgrave, too. I've not played it but the scope is similar to Mordheim and from what I've read the rules aren't complex.

thesoundofmusica
28-07-2015, 14:57
AoS with just a handful of models sounds about right. Free rules etc

Aseram
28-07-2015, 17:23
Thanks for the thoughtful responses. I had an Island of Blood set that was untouched so we put some of the models together and played a small 8th edition battle on a 2x4 table with 3 small units on each side. Didn't get into advanced rules but we did some charges and a couple rounds of shooting and combat with his Skaven general conveniently flanking and ultimately mopping the floor with my Sea Guard.

I think I will slowly add a few models and units to our armies each time as well as expand the table size as I have three 2x4 sections. I'm going to hold off on the painting as I think that will be way too tedious at his age.

Re: AoS, I haven't tried this game yet but I actually think the basic 8th edition rules with tightly grouped blocks makes it easier to keep track of everything and the rules are more or less clear. Maybe I'm wrong but it seems like AoS is so open to interpretation and vague that it would be harder to teach someone how to play a game that has such little structure.

Perhaps if he starts getting frustrated with 8th I will take a step back and shift to AoS though.

Atia
28-07-2015, 17:29
yep, AoS is a great intro system :) played it with my little sister last week, and she had fun :P

E-Dog
28-07-2015, 19:38
My 9 year old son recently showed an interest in warhammer. I started him off with 500pt games, I kept it simple and didn't bother explaining advanced rules. I also found it better to explain things as they came up (like combat res) so that he could see the rules in practice, rather than just explaining how things work.

Now we play 1000pt games and he makes his own lists. It was a great way to teach him about percentages.

Hope this helps.

Aseram
28-07-2015, 20:13
That's a good point. We did discuss percentages a couple times and basic math with charge rolls and such. Once we start building army lists I think Ill do it by hand to teach him how to add larger numbers together. Baby steps though.

Tokamak
28-07-2015, 20:29
There's so much useful things a kid can learn from warhammer. Not just the mundane numbers stuff. Planning armies, learning to budget, storytelling, organising, creativity, it's all in there.

If I had a kid (and that kid was interested in the hobby) I'd make sure (s)he would pass through all these experience. Don't chew too much for them and also avoid impulsiveness. Always finishing what you start should be the biggest lesson in there.

Aseram
28-07-2015, 20:48
You're absolutely right. Lots of good things can come from this hobby and I'm realizing that even though he is young it will hopefully stimulate him a lot more than the video games that most kids are playing.

Astrella
28-07-2015, 22:51
I been trying the game with my daughter for some time (she is 6 now). I always let her help me with the models. At first, just let her move the models over the table, but this year we start to play a game with dices. Just a few miniatures with no hard rules. The idea was to teach her how to move, how to enter in combat and how to roll the dices.

Her side has just 4 miniatures, She chose the models and all of them are characters (she picked a elf archer, a gnome girl from reaper miniatures, a dwarf longbeard and a female warrior from reaper too). The stats are no that important, she just want to know how many wounds the models have and the numbers she needs on the dices. My side has rats, goblins, spiders and every model I can think she would like to beat. Even we put some animal companions on the board so she can found them.

It's not Warhammer, she always win (some days is easier for her, some days is harder), but we enjoy it and I believe that some day we will be playing a more complex game, but the true is that at this time, it doesn't even matter to me.

That is very adorable. :)