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Bob Hunk
04-12-2015, 13:05
I saw this article about GW (http://www.theregister.co.uk/2015/12/04/sysadmins_100000_revenge_after_sudden_sacking/) on IT website theregister.co.uk this morning (link is SFW). I thought it may be of interest to some. ;)

Maccwar
04-12-2015, 13:28
:eek:

But thinking about this it explains a lot ... if GW are still paying for that line then this is why they keep having to raise their prices. :)

stevegill
04-12-2015, 14:03
I'd hate to know how much it costs to support something like that now if it still hasn't been replaced ;)

Little Joe
04-12-2015, 14:26
I think you will find this happening a lot. Managers are generally far far away from what IT "magic" can do in their minds.

A good IT admin will always strive to create redundancy though, it makes his job easier. Sadly to the management level that looks too often like: "Why do we need that man, a monkey can press the right buttons!". Always forgeting that we live in a world of change where new buttons are needed all the time AND said IT guy might get a better job offer. Then you are screwed.

jtrowell
04-12-2015, 15:21
Hum, the gy fired after a successful deploiement, soon after that his manager is fired too ?

I wonder if it was when they paid Kirby's wife company 4 millions £ to make the new website, it would make sense with the story and means that they made the IT guys (both the guy from the article and his manager) dig their own grave by implementing an interface with the new system before firing them once it was done, a sad but too common "strategy" in some companies.

Hum, thinking about it, no it's probably much older than that, the new website came a few years ago when broadband was already common and ISDN obsolete.

Do someone remember a previous large change to GW website before that ? Probably something during the very late 90s to early 2000s ?

Herzlos
04-12-2015, 16:31
DSL came to the UK about 2000, so it'd have been earlyish 90's. I assume that also fits in with them adding an EU HQ? I know they don't exist any more but I've no idea when they were created.

NCO
04-12-2015, 17:35
Sounds like fun detective work narrowing down the time.

For 2 weeks wait they really screwed up.

shelfunit.
04-12-2015, 18:12
A classic reaping what you sow moment. I doubt they have learned anything from it, and it might even be what has caused their aversion to the internet all this time.

BramGaunt
04-12-2015, 18:43
DSL came to the UK about 2000, so it'd have been earlyish 90's. I assume that also fits in with them adding an EU HQ? I know they don't exist any more but I've no idea when they were created.

Guessing it was when GW Germany had it's HQ installed in Düsseldorf, that was as far as I know by far the biggest GW installation on continental europe, and CS there also represented the rest of europe, and as far as I know they also managed continental europes stock. Not sure though.

Drakkar du Chaos
04-12-2015, 20:19
I think you will find this happening a lot. Managers are generally far far away from what IT "magic" can do in their minds.

A good IT admin will always strive to create redundancy though, it makes his job easier. Sadly to the management level that looks too often like: "Why do we need that man, a monkey can press the right buttons!". Always forgeting that we live in a world of change where new buttons are needed all the time AND said IT guy might get a better job offer. Then you are screwed.

Yeah to this. But it's positive for me because companies always pay me double for repairing their mistakes in record time.

theredknight
05-12-2015, 00:13
very entertaining story :D

ModernKiwi
06-12-2015, 20:02
Speaking as a sysadmin (for the past 20 years even), the guy in the story was a dick. Even when being made redundant you don't walk away leaving a live grenade like that.

Blenk87
06-12-2015, 23:05
Speaking as a sysadmin (for the past 20 years even), the guy in the story was a dick. Even when being made redundant you don't walk away leaving a live grenade like that.

Kind of agree with you, but it's also kind of a dick move to make someone redundant without any warning or notice. I'm sure it was costly for him to.

Also technically his responsibility ended the moment that meeting ended. Lack of forward planning by the manger(s) to not ensure loose ends were tied up.

Ben
06-12-2015, 23:28
They did call him away from his desk, then have him escorted out by security. So no time to do an end of job handover. It was there own fault. Who is he going to explain it to? The security guard?

ModernKiwi
06-12-2015, 23:29
Well yes. GW were also a bunch of dicks (which I know will come as a shock to all the members on the forum). But professional pride (if nothing else) would have ensured that I'd have told them what they were coming up against. It's one of those moments you can point to in an interview when asked about your professionalism.

(I've been told once to get out and not return and the bastards didn't pay out my notice either, but I wasn't unhappy to leave).

Scribe of Khorne
06-12-2015, 23:51
Speaking as a sysadmin (for the past 20 years even), the guy in the story was a dick. Even when being made redundant you don't walk away leaving a live grenade like that.

Ehhhhh as someone in IT for the past 10 years (I bow to your seniority) I 100% would let that happen. I'm still cleaning up for idiots to this day who where fired years ago, but if I get fired without notice? Yeah I'll let you reap what you sow.

ModernKiwi
06-12-2015, 23:53
Ohh, I'd be tempted. No doubts there. But the opportunity to be all morally superior and smug would come to fore as it usually does in these matters. Hell I still deal straight with my ex-wife for exactly the same reason... :D

NCO
07-12-2015, 01:58
the opportunity to be all morally superior and smug would come to fore

In one job I worked in this didn't do much good, after repeatedly telling them what was going to go wrong and 3-4 months and a year later (when I visited) seeing the exact things happen like I predicted.
Sometimes the people up above are too lazy to do things right.

ModernKiwi
07-12-2015, 02:12
The best four words in the English language are


I told you so.

Herzlos
07-12-2015, 09:21
Speaking as a sysadmin (for the past 20 years even), the guy in the story was a dick. Even when being made redundant you don't walk away leaving a live grenade like that.

But then his manager presumably also knew since it would have been a pretty significant investment. So it's not as if he would have been the only source of this information. Of course; he couldn't know that his manager got walked out shortly after he did too.

Buddy Bear
07-12-2015, 09:35
They got what they deserved. If they had given him notice and treated him like a decent human being that'd be one thing, but they got rid of him and had him perpwalked out of the building by security like he was a criminal.

The_Real_Chris
07-12-2015, 10:08
That was probably due to being worried about what an angry IT person could do to your system. It was all the rage to write about the damage they could do at one point.

He could have got in touch, sent a letter etc. But why? The people weren't good employers and his responsibility ended with his job. Assuming they bought out his leave or something he wouldn't have been employed from the time he exited the building? Guess it depends ont he terms of his termination, he could have still been employed for a month just not in the office for example.

Niall78
07-12-2015, 10:55
The leason of this tale : Treat employees like dirt and they will reciprocate.

Fair play to the lad. His responsibilities ended the minute he was frogmarched out of the building. Maybe the management were too embarrassed by the situation to do a proper debriefing interview? Expensive mistake.

It probably helped GW understand that skilled technical employees are much more problematic and dangerous to fire than the unskilled shop front people GW are used to abusing.

ModernKiwi
07-12-2015, 20:02
That was probably due to being worried about what an angry IT person could do to your system. It was all the rage to write about the damage they could do at one point.
....

The temptation to go all BOFH is often strong.

I was the guy at the MSP I worked at for 8 years that got sent in to clean up after circumstances like this. So I'll repeat, while it may have felt satisfying for him it was totally unprofessional. If he'd applied for a job and this was known, he'd be at the bottom of the list for hiring because it suggests that as soon as he got grumpy with a client he'd walk away leaving a hot steaming stinky surprise behind.

Zywus
07-12-2015, 21:14
But he didn't walk away in this case?
He simply didn't put in any extra effort to contact and brief the company after they had marched him out.

If he at any time were asked if there were anything his successor should be aware of and chose to not tell them, it would be a different scenario.

Buddy Bear
07-12-2015, 21:16
Yeah. Not only did they not ask, they had a guy with a gun on hand to prevent him from talking with anybody on his way out the door.

ModernKiwi
07-12-2015, 22:40
But he didn't walk away in this case?
He simply didn't put in any extra effort to contact and brief the company after they had marched him out.

If he at any time were asked if there were anything his successor should be aware of and chose to not tell them, it would be a different scenario.

It's unprofessional which is pretty much the worst insult I could give a fellow sysadmin.

It shows he took no pride in his work. If a lawyer or a surgeon had the same approach, their professional associations would have slammed them.

That same series on The Register has people who kept things running in the middle of Hurricane Katrina. Or who travelled 1,000's of km to fix things that other people broke. Who went above and beyond. They get my admiration. This guy, not in the slightest.

Misfratz
07-12-2015, 22:50
Where was the documentation? What if the IT guy in this story had been hit by a truck and put in a coma, rather than fired. The exact same thing would have happened because he didn't document his work.

That's a rubbish way to work. Irresponsible as hell.

Dryaktylus
07-12-2015, 23:02
but they got rid of him and had him perpwalked out of the building by security like he was a criminal.

Hum... is that really the usual way they deal with their employees? I don't know, but maybe there was... more.

Lord Damocles
07-12-2015, 23:07
Hum... is that really the usual way they deal with their employees? I don't know, but maybe there was... more.
I'd be wary of accepting a third-hand account which places all of the blame at GW's door at the best of times.

The_Real_Chris
07-12-2015, 23:23
There was a time when many corporate horror stories about irate IT people led to close guard being put on you. Never to not talking to colleagues though as far as I know. Probably was something else if he didn't have any colleagues from work check up and ask him what went down.

Herzlos
08-12-2015, 09:01
Where was the documentation? What if the IT guy in this story had been hit by a truck and put in a coma, rather than fired. The exact same thing would have happened because he didn't document his work.

There probably was documentation and it'll have been mentioned in the meetings, but I bet no-one ever thought of looking.

BFalcon
08-12-2015, 10:10
It's unprofessional which is pretty much the worst insult I could give a fellow sysadmin.

It shows he took no pride in his work. If a lawyer or a surgeon had the same approach, their professional associations would have slammed them.

That same series on The Register has people who kept things running in the middle of Hurricane Katrina. Or who travelled 1,000's of km to fix things that other people broke. Who went above and beyond. They get my admiration. This guy, not in the slightest.

Erm... quite honestly, I'd agree with the guy being fired. It's up to the company to allow you the chance to debrief - that's why you HAVE the debriefs, after all. It's one thing when you're still employed, but you cannot expect someone to put themselves out, after being fired and marched from the building, to the point where he'd contact the company when it was time to put the order in.

I've gone far over what I've been paid to do in the past and worked when feeling downright ill, to keep things moving. I'm honestly not about to do the same for a boss that's just marched me out of the building... as far as I was concerned, my responsibilities to that company would end at the normal working day on that date. I would certainly NOT be looking to remind them every few days about something they MAY have forgotten to do... and certainly not chase them up a few weeks' later.

If you fire someone, you either make sure they've done all the work you paid them to do, or you have full documentation of anything they were going to do. You certainly don't fire someone and then expect them to keep working for you. As Misfratz says, the documentation should have been there in the first place (and would almost certainly have been there, if his boss had any idea of how to do his job). It was down to whoever replaced him (or his own boss) to carry out the order, as soon as it was possible.

Had they given him notice, I'd have expected him to fully document the jobs that he was due to do, even if they removed all his access to the main computer systems and only allowed him a normal access level account to do the work on. You certainly don't "guillotine" an employee and then complain when he hadn't had the chance to do the job. Especially since we don't know if he didn't already TELL them about the swap-over and the delays were at the ISP (he'd not have been allowed to discuss corporate matters with the ISP after that date and probably wouldn't have been told that they hadn't done so if he'd spoken to his boss either.

Lastly: Usually in these sorts of situations, nobody in the business would be allowed to discuss that organisation's internal operations. If he left ANY documentation (and it sounds like he'd agreed with his boss to do the order when possible, with the ISDN as a stop-gap), he'd have only known that they'd failed to actually carry out the work, when his boss finally contacted him. Usually, being found to have discussed internal workings with an ex-employee is grounds for dismissal, if I remember correctly. The boss being fired also, may have also contributed to this, it should be pointed out.

Oh and lastly, lastly... it should also be pointed out: This was back in 2000/2002, approximately - it would have been very early on in the ADSL rollout, being in a major city and in an industrial or business park, it would have been an early convert (unlike Cornwall, where I lived). Back then, IT staff were (usually) a lot more respected and hard to get hold of... which makes this guy's treatment even more unusual.

Bloodknight
08-12-2015, 11:54
Back then, IT staff were (usually) a lot more respected and hard to get hold of... which makes this guy's treatment even more unusual.

We don't know if there was a reason for it, though. He might well not have been trustworthy. But then I live in a country where being fired without notice requires you to have done something really harsh and damaging if the company doesn't want to get successfully sued (so usually companies try to make sure their argument is ironclad), so my judgement here might be coloured by that.

stevegill
08-12-2015, 11:57
Oh and lastly, lastly... it should also be pointed out: This was back in 2000/2002, approximately - it would have been very early on in the ADSL rollout, being in a major city and in an industrial or business park, it would have been an early convert (unlike Cornwall, where I lived). Back then, IT staff were (usually) a lot more respected and hard to get hold of... which makes this guy's treatment even more unusual.
2000 - 2002, IT staff respected? Nope, not even remotely. It was just after the fun times cleaning up the Millennium Bug shenanigans (in oh so many ways) and there was a glut of staff on the market at all levels and skills. Rates plummeted, though that was more of a correction as they had been rising rather rapidly for a few years.
Getting walked out of the office so you could spend your notice period on 'gardening leave' was also very common at the time as companies were very sensitive to the risks of having upset IT staff around.

Zywus
08-12-2015, 12:23
We don't know if there was a reason for it, though. He might well not have been trustworthy. But then I live in a country where being fired without notice requires you to have done something really harsh and damaging if the company doesn't want to get successfully sued (so usually companies try to make sure their argument is ironclad), so my judgement here might be coloured by that.
Of course there may be more to the story. We only have the guys perspective after all and people tend to paint themselves in a positive light and leave out parts that make them look bad.

That said; I assume that the discussion here assumes for arguments sake that this is a correct retelling of what went down. Hopefully people keep in mind that there may be factors that is left out but since we do not know of such I don't see the need to speculate that they might have existed.

If you get no request about any debriefing and the company is the one cutting the ties; I think it's really going well above and beyond to initiate communication with the company that no longer employs you. If they had called him after termination and asked if there were anything that they should be aware about then I'd say he probably wouldn't be legally responsible if he left them in the dark but probably should have alerted them about the ISDN connection out of respect to his profession if nothing else.

BFalcon
08-12-2015, 14:29
2000 - 2002, IT staff respected? Nope, not even remotely. It was just after the fun times cleaning up the Millennium Bug shenanigans (in oh so many ways) and there was a glut of staff on the market at all levels and skills. Rates plummeted, though that was more of a correction as they had been rising rather rapidly for a few years.
Getting walked out of the office so you could spend your notice period on 'gardening leave' was also very common at the time as companies were very sensitive to the risks of having upset IT staff around.

This actually sounds about right, tbh - I was sent on a Y2K course myself (more to make up numbers, tbh) and there was real fear about the impact beforehand, but I can well imagine the sudden lack of fear afterwards, tbh... which, thinking about it, would have lead to a surplus of staff, so yes, I should have taken that into consideration... my main experiences were pre-2000 and I forgot that whole Y2K episode (more a matter of self-therapy, I think) and the aftermath. I would have expected a company to conduct a debrief though, even so... which, if held inside that leave, would be legally binding, I think.

I agree, Zywus, he should have done so... but then, if he received no hint of being sacked, then he was under no obligation (legal or otherwise) to actually chase them up, IMO... if you sack someone, it's up to you to chase them up and keep them friendly to you.

Of course, all my speculation and viewpoint is, indeed, from the standpoint of "James" telling the truth and not twisting it at all. If he'd done something wrong, ANY company would have frogmarched him out the door... it's a standard security precaution, after all. I think the major slip-up from GW here wasn't the sacking, so much, as the lack of a formal debrief and sacking his manager right afterwards. By sacking his manager, who may have been verbally debriefed at some point or who may have been fully aware of (ie hadn't forgotten about) the temporary system in place and who may not have debriefed his boss for whatever reason... so the fault may not be "James"' at all, but his boss. We simply don't know. It may be the director's fault for not bothering to read his mail/reports/memos for all we know...

ModernKiwi
08-12-2015, 19:40
2000 - 2002, IT staff respected? Nope, not even remotely. It was just after the fun times cleaning up the Millennium Bug shenanigans (in oh so many ways) and there was a glut of staff on the market at all levels and skills. Rates plummeted, though that was more of a correction as they had been rising rather rapidly for a few years.
Getting walked out of the office so you could spend your notice period on 'gardening leave' was also very common at the time as companies were very sensitive to the risks of having upset IT staff around.

I was contracting in the UK up until mid 2000 and you could feel the effect on the contracting market from early to mid 1999 as a whole load of bozo's who'd been doing Y2K work got dumped back into the market. I was lucky enough that my job kept rolling over at the same rate as before (even if the days of an hourly rate rise every renegotiation were gone), but I knew some (fairly good) engineers who spent 6-12 months off work.

jtrowell
09-12-2015, 11:00
Also, it's fairly probable that the guy didn't order the temporary ISDN link without at least discussing it with his manager and/or accounting, so when he was fired suddenly (with probably lots of other things to think about), he probably expected his manager or someone else to cancel the link as planned.

Of course he does say that his manager was also fired soon after ... :shifty:

Cergorach
09-12-2015, 11:26
Where was the documentation? What if the IT guy in this story had been hit by a truck and put in a coma, rather than fired. The exact same thing would have happened because he didn't document his work.

That's a rubbish way to work. Irresponsible as hell.

While I agree, after 15 years in IT I can tell you that often management doesn't allow time for proper documentation or proper infrastructure and management. Hell, sometimes IT doesn't have the time to properly log tickets. This can have many causes besides lazy sysadmins ;-) From outdated software that works far to slow, to no procedures in place, to under staffing.

I have once been fired on the spot in my life (that wasn't an IT job btw.), and that feels like a gut punch. Not only that, your quite busy scrambling to find another job, so it wouldn't surprise me at all if he completely forgot until they called him.


2000 - 2002, IT staff respected? Nope, not even remotely.
And with a good damn reason, to many IT staff had a godcomplex: We're IT and we'll decide how the company IT should run! Not a bone of customer communication skills.

I remember January 1st 2000 early in the morning a colleague and I running around the store testing all the registers, printers, scanners, PIN paymentsytems, etc. After that I actually got a fulltime job in IT, as a sericedesk employee I was literally shouted at (over the phone) by internal customers and IT admins (both colleagues). And I honestly couldn't blame the internal customers for feeling that frustrated, it was a mess and the IT staff mentality didn't help much either. It took years to get that mess running smoothly (and walking into the sysadmin offices with a baseball bat helped a lot)...

Many people didn't understand computers like they do now (they still don't understand them, but they can use them). And the folks that pretended to understand them (sysadmins) were acting like antisocial jerks, because they were antisocial jerks that had no business communicating with (internal) customers directly.

stevegill
09-12-2015, 12:42
While I agree, after 15 years in IT I can tell you that often management doesn't allow time for proper documentation or proper infrastructure and management. Hell, sometimes IT doesn't have the time to properly log tickets. This can have many causes besides lazy sysadmins ;-) From outdated software that works far to slow, to no procedures in place, to under staffing.

I have once been fired on the spot in my life (that wasn't an IT job btw.), and that feels like a gut punch. Not only that, your quite busy scrambling to find another job, so it wouldn't surprise me at all if he completely forgot until they called him.


And with a good damn reason, to many IT staff had a godcomplex: We're IT and we'll decide how the company IT should run! Not a bone of customer communication skills.

I remember January 1st 2000 early in the morning a colleague and I running around the store testing all the registers, printers, scanners, PIN paymentsytems, etc. After that I actually got a fulltime job in IT, as a sericedesk employee I was literally shouted at (over the phone) by internal customers and IT admins (both colleagues). And I honestly couldn't blame the internal customers for feeling that frustrated, it was a mess and the IT staff mentality didn't help much either. It took years to get that mess running smoothly (and walking into the sysadmin offices with a baseball bat helped a lot)...

Many people didn't understand computers like they do now (they still don't understand them, but they can use them). And the folks that pretended to understand them (sysadmins) were acting like antisocial jerks, because they were antisocial jerks that had no business communicating with (internal) customers directly.
Had the no-warning redundancy meeting myself many years ago. Definitely something I don't want to go through again.

A good sysadmin should never be allowed to communicate directly with non-techies with the single exception of their handler / translator / carer - usually called the IT Ops Manager, sometimes the DevOps Project Manager, very often the IT manager / director. That's one of the reasons why we have IT management and functional teams, the Venn diagram overlap of people with good communication skills and people with good technical skills is very small indeed. :D

ModernKiwi
09-12-2015, 21:02
...A good sysadmin should never be allowed to communicate directly with non-techies with the single exception of their handler / translator / carer - usually called the IT Ops Manager, sometimes the DevOps Project Manager, very often the IT manager / director. That's one of the reasons why we have IT management and functional teams, the Venn diagram overlap of people with good communication skills and people with good technical skills is very small indeed. :D

I have very good communication skills, both written and oral. That's why I was the "clean up" guy who was sent it to fix up screw ups caused by god-complex IT people. I'm also good technically, but no kind of guru or anything. But having good people skills has seen me survive many culls where god-complex gurus have been let go.

stevegill
10-12-2015, 11:26
I have very good communication skills, both written and oral. That's why I was the "clean up" guy who was sent it to fix up screw ups caused by god-complex IT people. I'm also good technically, but no kind of guru or anything. But having good people skills has seen me survive many culls where god-complex gurus have been let go.
Yup, mixed funky-tech is the way of the future as most organisations seem to have lost the ability to handle their gurus (they leave that to places like google).

Gaebriel
12-12-2015, 10:53
They only had a £100,000 whole year's IT investment budget?

xerxeshavelock
16-12-2015, 10:59
They only had a £100,000 whole year's IT investment budget?

They also had less RAM at head office than your phone......

Reinholt
20-12-2015, 20:18
Yup, mixed funky-tech is the way of the future as most organisations seem to have lost the ability to handle their gurus (they leave that to places like google).

The problem with a lot of the god-complex guys is that, at non-tech companies, they aren't worth putting up with.

I will say I have personally had people in tech fired for this behavior at my current job (I also usually don't tell them up front that I have graduate level degrees in mathematics, know how to program, etc., so it's easy to catch them lying and being lazy). They don't make the money for us; they are a cost. I expect them to do their job properly, and if you are going to give me massive attitude when you are a replaceable cog in a business I run, what did you expect to happen?

This is not to be dismissive: good IT people with at least average people skills are worth their weight in gold. What the ones with truly poor people skills often fail to understand is that they deliver sub-par performance by either irritating people working for me who are more important than them, or by delivering sub-par results because even though they had the technical skills to get plenty done, they couldn't communicate with other human beings to find out what actually mattered to have done.

Ironically, this is back to the GW issue: if you have the capability to do well, but you don't because you are a bunch of unobservant jerks, well, what does it matter? You still failed. Just because you could have succeeded doesn't mean you did.

On the topic of the article: unless you are firing someone for cause, always treat them well on the way out. Even if you have to revoke access (and, again, I understand why this would be done), pay out their notice period and don't sack them day-of. I've paid people to sit at home because it was the right thing to do, and listed them as employed so they could interview for new jobs while they still "had a job" as per our records. If you are firing for cause, you should have had someone do a forensic analysis before letting them go, and something like that error should have been found.

I suspect if GW had done this, they would have caught the error.

memitchell747
21-12-2015, 15:17
Twenty years ago, a guy I know got fired/quit over a promised bonus. Slicked the computer on his way out. Guys like him made corporate practices like the story necessary. From some of the sympathetic responses here, we can see IT still isn't a profession, yet.

Hishbishy
21-12-2015, 20:53
Twenty years ago, a guy I know got fired/quit over a promised bonus. Slicked the computer on his way out. Guys like him made corporate practices like the story necessary. From some of the sympathetic responses here, we can see IT still isn't a profession, yet.

There is a difference between taking reasonable precautions and being a complete ass. GW was the latter in this scenario. As Reinholt stated, they could have kept him on payroll and let him interview as "employed." Had they done so and kept the lines of communication open, he could have informed them of any problems occuring.

As it was, they not only canned him, but they canned his boss, which he didn't know about. That's how GW screwed themselves over: they canned the two people who knew what was happening without giving them a chance to bring any replacements up to speed. If the guy had been a dick when they called and said "Hey, I'm not telling you ****" then it would have been rude and unprofessional, but he didn't. His responsibility to GW ended the moment they informed him he no longer worked for them and would not be allowed to access his computer or talk to his colleagues.

ColShaw
21-12-2015, 22:28
On the topic of the article: unless you are firing someone for cause, always treat them well on the way out. Even if you have to revoke access (and, again, I understand why this would be done), pay out their notice period and don't sack them day-of. I've paid people to sit at home because it was the right thing to do, and listed them as employed so they could interview for new jobs while they still "had a job" as per our records. If you are firing for cause, you should have had someone do a forensic analysis before letting them go, and something like that error should have been found.

Interestingly enough, this is pretty much what happened when I was a Redshirt at GW. They sacked me (along with all but 1 other employee of the store), but my boss was as kind about it as he could be, gave me two weeks' severance, listed me as "resigned" rather than "fired" (which helped me get my next job), and even offered to give me one last store purchase, of whatever amount, still using my employee discount.

As a result, I had no ill-will at all towards the folks at that particular GW, and continued as an avid supporter of Gee-dub right up until they lost me with 40K 6th Ed. But that's a different story...

Anyway, I just wanted to mention that I had a quite different experience at GW, to let people know that they aren't always like that. :)

Hishbishy
22-12-2015, 19:31
Anyway, I just wanted to mention that I had a quite different experience at GW, to let people know that they aren't always like that. :)

Well, with any business you're going to get different results from manager to manager, especially when you're talking about retail. However, this was the main office we're talking about, and the corporate culture there has been pretty consistently awful.

aprilmanha
23-12-2015, 11:15
My GW work experience was a mostly positive one.

All Positive for the first 6 months, and then Negative for the Later 6 months due to an Area Manager change.

The previous area manager worked hard and always ensured that staff under him understood what was expected of them and offered advice on how to achieve that.
The new area manager worked by only communicating when you called him first, and even then would be dismissive if you didn't tell Him what he wanted of you.

I much prefered the previous manager just for the fact I knew I could always ask him about anything and get a straight answer, which encouraged us to live up to his requests.

--

I do have one fun IT story as well.
Later on I worked in a place doing Customer IT support, and in the support team we did a little development of our own, adding to and improving our support systems that the Real Devs were not interested in improving.
One young IT Guru I worked with managed to get core server access he was not meant to have and deployed an update of his own without even asking if it was ok to do so, on a system that if it failed would cripple the support team.

When it came to light that he had done this the next day, he got a dressing down by the IT manager as you would expect, for accessing the system without authority and making changes without checking it was ok.

After this, he went back to his computer and then 5 minutes later ran out the back of the building in tears.

About 30 minutes later I noticed that a number of things were not working correctly, and thinking it was a loose cable again went to check on things.
Turns out he had accessed the systems he was not meant to and used this access to Delete Root on our servers.
He had not thought to delete the log of him doing this though and it took us only a few minutes to get this proof...

Luckily he had not initiated a full reformat, and our real Tech Gurus managed to DD the entire server and recover everything by the next morning.

Wolf Lord Balrog
24-12-2015, 06:57
I saw this article about GW (http://www.theregister.co.uk/2015/12/04/sysadmins_100000_revenge_after_sudden_sacking/) on IT website theregister.co.uk this morning (link is SFW). I thought it may be of interest to some. ;)

A delightfully entertaining story, and a perfect illustration of the sorts of mistakes GW remains prone to making to this day. See: Failcast and AOS.