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Okuto
06-01-2016, 19:31
So I was GMing for my local store's deathwatch campaign and one of my players decided he wanted to retire his ultramarine character to start another and it occurred to me that there's little mention of marines retiring, going AWOL sure but outright retiring is another.

Thing is, his character had a perfect fully legit reason to "retire" imo. He was suffering from multiple injuries, had replaced so much of himself that a iron hand would blush and had intended to spend "retirement" governing and training the next gen in Ultramar.

It sounded perfectfully reasonable to me and I let him do it but I'm curious what everyone thinks. Also it gives me ideas for old grumpie retired marine npcs.

Perversor
06-01-2016, 19:43
So I was GMing for my local store's deathwatch campaign and one of my players decided he wanted to retire his ultramarine character to start another and it occurred to me that there's little mention of marines retiring, going AWOL sure but outright retiring is another.

Thing is, his character had a perfect fully legit reason to "retire" imo. He was suffering from multiple injuries, had replaced so much of himself that a iron hand would blush and had intended to spend "retirement" governing and training the next gen in Ultramar.

It sounded perfectfully reasonable to me and I let him do it but I'm curious what everyone thinks. Also it gives me ideas for old grumpie retired marine npcs.

Marines never retire, her duty it's protect humankind.

The closest is when they have too many injuries on their bodies to keep figthing properly.
Wich often leads to a promotion to Dreadnought.

Lusall
06-01-2016, 19:46
Only in death does duty end, my friend.

And sometimes, not even there.

Theocracity
06-01-2016, 19:57
I think a marine 'retiring' by transferring to the 10th company to train initiates makes sense. He's not going to be resting on his laurels though. As noted, duty only ends in death - so he'd still be expected to fulfill all the duties of an Astartes when called, serving wherever needed despite injury or pain.

Lord Damocles
06-01-2016, 20:10
'Although the Codex describes a number of ranks and responsibilities within the headquarters staff, only a very few of these officers actually accompany the Chapter to war. Many are non-combatants of advanced years whose roles are to find and train recruits or administrate the Chapter...'
Codex: Space Marines (5th ed.), pg.16

nagash66
07-01-2016, 12:10
'Although the Codex describes a number of ranks and responsibilities within the headquarters staff, only a very few of these officers actually accompany the Chapter to war. Many are non-combatants of advanced years whose roles are to find and train recruits or administrate the Chapter...'
Codex: Space Marines (5th ed.), pg.16

Yeah we have had examples from BL books of the older, more injured marines being pulled from front line duties, was it the Flesh tearers who embedded a injured brother into a ships command throne iirc? And plenty of older vets have popped up being sent to the Chapters C&C elements.

=Angel=
07-01-2016, 14:23
The Soul Drinkers had a veteran in terminator armour who was ancient and slow, mostly bionics. He was used to teach recruits.
When the recruits rebelled, he took a plasma shot to the chest and kept coming, albeit slowly, eventually being cut to pieces by weight of fire.

I think its implied that while bionics make you more durable, they are slower than marine reaction speed and so a heavily cyborg'd marine is somewhat of a liability unless the bionics are particularly high grade.
Then there's the issue that marines aren't orks, the grafts/bionics might not take properly and so you may have an amputee astartes with a peg-leg or hook hand or what have you.

In the context of a Deathwatch game though, 'retiring' a character means they have finished their tour and return to their parent chapter to pass on skills and be edgy scout sergeants.

Novacane
07-01-2016, 15:17
'Although the Codex describes a number of ranks and responsibilities within the headquarters staff, only a very few of these officers actually accompany the Chapter to war. Many are non-combatants of advanced years whose roles are to find and train recruits or administrate the Chapter...'
Codex: Space Marines (5th ed.), pg.16

Was gonna quote this, you beat me to it.

As with Lifers in the Armed Forces, as they rise in ranks, they take on more jobs that require them to be "Desk Generals".

A rank and file Marine couldn't retire, but a Captain or higher could could, in theory. Even Sargeants may "retire", joining Honour Guards for Captains and higher. They would see less active duty, but would still play a big part.

Gimp
07-01-2016, 18:47
As always depends a lot on the chapter. I know the Ultramarines do this because in one of the Ultramarines books an old officer was on one their worlds doing something official (traing idf or advising the governor or something)

Also I imagine the Salamanders do the same considering the active role they play in everday society on their homeword.

Matthueycamo
07-01-2016, 23:14
They retire from fighting on the front lines but not from serving the chapter. They just do things like training and administrative jobs when not up to front line combat anymore.

But for Deathwatch it would be as simple as going back the parent chapter after the end of a mission. I think this is covered in the First Founding supplement allowing marines to leave and come back as the player wants. I think it's called terms of service or something like that.

Sai-Lauren
09-01-2016, 19:17
Dare I say "depends on the chapter"? Some might allow honoured veterans to retire when they're no longer combat effective (potentially even allowing them to start families, with any offspring possibly being good potential recruuits), others may move them into support/training roles, others may dose them up on combat drugs (or for Blood Angels and successors, there's the Death Company, like Tycho) and launch them at an enemy so they get an honourable death in combat.

Circumstances may play a part as well - the original Deathwing (Space Hulk supplement) had the surviving marines become the chiefs of various tribes on their homeworld, effectively retiring, but helping produce potential new recruits for their chapter.

Okuto
09-01-2016, 23:43
'Although the Codex describes a number of ranks and responsibilities within the headquarters staff, only a very few of these officers actually accompany the Chapter to war. Many are non-combatants of advanced years whose roles are to find and train recruits or administrate the Chapter...'
Codex: Space Marines (5th ed.), pg.16

This is perfect Lord Damocles, much appreciated.

Good to see even space marines have a "expiration date" that doesn't involve a dreadnaught


As always depends a lot on the chapter. I know the Ultramarines do this because in one of the Ultramarines books an old officer was on one their worlds doing something official (traing idf or advising the governor or something)

Also I imagine the Salamanders do the same considering the active role they play in everday society on their homeword.

Yeah I was thinking the same thing, I wouldn't see it as out of the ordinary for a badly injured Ultramarine to leave active service and return home to serve the chapter by training and looking for new recruits

The ultramarines seem like the governing and building type, it felt fine that he'd retire to ultramar to train troops and govern


I think its implied that while bionics make you more durable, they are slower than marine reaction speed and so a heavily cyborg'd marine is somewhat of a liability unless the bionics are particularly high grade.

Then there's the issue that marines aren't orks, the grafts/bionics might not take properly and so you may have an amputee astartes with a peg-leg or hook hand or what have you.

This was one of the arguments he used yes.

Dryaktylus
09-01-2016, 23:55
Here you go. (http://wh40k.lexicanum.com/wiki/Cloud_Runner) Go home, kill some Genestealers, retire.:cool:

224494

The Black Shield
10-01-2016, 02:14
I've always seen it as the old 40K trope of "Only in death does duty end."

Sai-Lauren
10-01-2016, 10:53
I've always seen it as the old 40K trope of "Only in death does duty end."
For a given definition of duty, of course. ;)

Lupe
10-01-2016, 16:15
I think, aside from permanent administrative duties, the only option that could count as retirement is permanent honour guard duty.

For instance, all the (12--- 15? I don't remember the exact figure) chapters that have fought the World Engine maintain an honour guard at the shrine built in honour of the Astral Knights' sacrifice.
The Space Wolves maintain a permanent honour guard on Terra, with their pacted navigator house.
I'm sure I could think of more examples if I put my mind on it it, so it wouldn't exactly be unheard of...