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nagash66
20-02-2016, 15:24
Well i thought it was a cracking read. Gave me more of what i loved about book 1 ( terran politics) and combined it with a often overlooked but much loved ( BFG is one of my all time favourite games) aspects of the warhammer 40k universe, space combat.

Characters were solid, plot moved along at a brisk yet not rushed pace ( with the exception of the final battle which was rushed) and ended on a high note. Only complaint is length, but that is what it is with this series.

Spellfire
20-02-2016, 18:09
Got through it in one sitting (short length still annoys me) enjoyed it far more than the last one, particularly the space battles. Restored my faith somewhat in this series.

Fen
21-02-2016, 18:59
Good read this time too :nod:


Even with it being a very minor thing,i loved the very visible spite Koorland shows every time there is talk of the codex Astartes breaking down the legions (when he points out that the Emperor had nothing to do with it :D )

Fits really well with the idea that,after all that went on after the Scouring with Guilliman,Dorn still took the time to create a "screw this crap,get the legion back in one piece and go kick ass" backup plan

MarcusAurelius
22-02-2016, 11:22
I've avoided it because it's by Gav Thorpe

Am I wrong to do so?

MajorWesJanson
23-02-2016, 03:18
It's quite good. My main annoyance besides the short length (all are too short) is the random use of yards and miles, when nearly all 40K works are metric.

Overall a lot of fun, with some cool little bits of history (like the founding of the departmento munitorum).

Makes me sad to see Orks being so strong and cunning an enemy in the fluff, when their newest rules are so bad

GavT
25-02-2016, 17:02
It's quite good. My main annoyance ... is the random use of yards and miles, when nearly all 40K works are metric.



Oh dear, you are quite right, that is rather odd of me after all these years (and odder still that the Editors did not pick it up)!

Cheers,

Gav

MajorWesJanson
27-02-2016, 10:12
Guess they have not rediscovered the STC for rulers yet and have to get by with a mix.

Quite a lot of fun otherwise and brings me back to the days when the Imperial Navy got good attention in books. And the bits about the inquisition are a nice balance between the more traditional fluff and Abnett ' more sructured and regimented take. I won't quite say it as strong at straight world building but it manages to blend a lot of things into a more cohesive whole while still giving an interesting ride.

Havarel
27-02-2016, 13:12
This was a great read. I'm a big fan of the focus on political intrigue not only with the High Lords but with the other branches of the Imperium. The inquisitorial intrigue is especially welcome.

veterannoob
27-02-2016, 13:18
I need t go through it again for an interview anyway but the comments here have been uplifting and interesting to read. Since this I obviously spoilers what do you all think the next step in Assassinorum vs. (or with) Inquisition? Love how they lay out Terra politics during this series.

MajorWesJanson
27-02-2016, 20:43
I need t go through it again for an interview anyway but the comments here have been uplifting and interesting to read. Since this I obviously spoilers what do you all think the next step in Assassinorum vs. (or with) Inquisition? Love how they lay out Terra politics during this series.

I wonder if we will see any call-backs to the idea that the Ordo Malleus was originally a sort of "Internal Affairs" branch of the Inquisition, rather than the counter-daemon branch, what with the seeming factionalization of the Inquisition causing trouble.

Tichey
28-02-2016, 04:14
I thought this one was fairly enjoyable. The naval conflict was good to see, and as always the political intrigue on Terra was great. Only this that annoyed me was the length, an extra 50 pages fleshing things out would of been much appreciated.

Nineswords
28-02-2016, 14:34
I've avoided it because it's by Gav Thorpe

Am I wrong to do so?

Yes. It's absolutely cracking, one of Gav's best in my opinion.

veterannoob
28-02-2016, 16:58
I wonder if we will see any call-backs to the idea that the Ordo Malleus was originally a sort of "Internal Affairs" branch of the Inquisition, rather than the counter-daemon branch, what with the seeming factionalization of the Inquisition causing trouble.
Oo' I got the feeling we just might from a previous interview. Combat Phase podcast is covering this series hitting each book hopefully around the preorder release of the next in series. We are recording re: Predator/Prey for release tomorrow. .....
....I'll have Gav back on in three weeks to cover Emperor Expects so if you have any questions you want me to ask please post here for best so everyone can see but you can also DM. Gav is always a great interview. I heard him last night discussing TBA on another show.

fluxdeluxe
02-03-2016, 10:55
Yes. It's absolutely cracking, one of Gav's best in my opinion.

He's really improved imo. He was auto avoid but once I'd gotten over the abomination that is paradise lost, I've really enjoyed a couple of his books. I especially liked this book I was disappointed when I reached the end.

Mellow
02-03-2016, 19:57
Personally I never really pay attention to who wrote the Novels so I don't know why some people avoid some authors whilst praising others.

I've enjoyed every The Beast Arises book so far and book 3 was no exception. The political scenes for me are the biggest pull into the storyline.

DarkChaplain
02-03-2016, 22:28
If I'd put authors on "auto avoid" every time I read a stinker story from them, I wouldn't be able to read Abnett anymore (though I'd argue that unlike most other authors, his mistakes are habit more so than misssteps).

Not every book by every author will work for everyone. Deliverance Lost was weak, but not close to how terrible people here make it out to be. Neither was Battle for the Abyss, for that matter. Nevermind that with growing experience, authors' skills improve. What was lacking in Deliverance Lost, for example, was visibly better in Soulforge and Ravenlord. You'll never know if you avoid the author's subsequent works, however. A slow start can pay off in sequels, too. A lot of people rag on Nick Kyme, but his short fiction has been increasingly good, and Deathfire, while flawed, had plenty of strong points. You won't know that if you gave up reading him after his first Salamanders novel or Vulkan Lives' excessive torture scenes.

This whole "legacy negativity" is more detrimental to the enjoyment of later releases than the quality of the work itself, in a lot of cases.