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View Full Version : What alloy is used in Citadel Miniatures?



NakedFisherman
29-07-2006, 03:24
More specifically, what metals is the 'white metal' alloy made out of?

starlight
29-07-2006, 03:46
<is distracted>

What was that again.........?

Oh yes, mostly tin, but for more information....http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pewter

The Winslow
29-07-2006, 04:00
tin and zinc, i believe. Man it's hard to think when those are jiggling.

generulpoleaxe
29-07-2006, 13:52
white metal does contain a small amount of lead.
without it, it is very brittle.

NakedFisherman
29-07-2006, 14:52
white metal does contain a small amount of lead.
without it, it is very brittle.

Are you sure about that? I know that Rackham's miniatures contain lead (and have a warning), but I thought almost all the rest moved to something entirely lead-free.

Tironum
29-07-2006, 15:10
Lead free "White Metal" usually consists of:

Tin
Antimony
Bismuth
Copper

Wintermute
29-07-2006, 17:56
white metal does contain a small amount of lead.
without it, it is very brittle.

GW's White Metal does not use lead. I believe its iilegal to use lead in figures manufactured/sold in Europe.

Additonally GW made a big thing of their metals being lead free a few years ago.

starlight
29-07-2006, 17:58
Yup, that's when they switched to this (newer) formula:


Lead free "White Metal" usually consists of:

Tin
Antimony
Bismuth
Copper

generulpoleaxe
29-07-2006, 19:43
that mix, may be correct.

but it is gw that has said that, and wikapedia only quotes an article by gw.
gw also claimed that greenstuff is not carsonogenic and that is why they sell it instead of milliput.
this is straight out lies. (green stuff is carsonogenic)
do not believe every thing you read or what companies tell you.

also, lead rich miniatures can be sold any where in the world.
a lot of companies changed there mix pre empting what they thought would be a ban.
they were wrong, and the expense was passed on to the customer.

starlight
29-07-2006, 19:55
Pewter - actually the information comes from various sources on the web, not just Wiki. As well Wiki sources far more than just GW (which *wasn't* a reference for the information I sourced).

Green Stuff:

GW uses it because it is the prefered medium of it's (and many other) sculptors. Simple, end of story.

http://polymericsystems.com/TechnicalData.htm

Right side, under *Epoxy Putty Ribbon*.

It's not GW's product, they just repackage it, so they are likely passing on the US manufacturers information.

The Winslow
30-07-2006, 04:33
also, lead rich miniatures can be sold any where in the world.
a lot of companies changed there mix pre empting what they thought would be a ban.
they were wrong, and the expense was passed on to the customer.

Lead miniatures were banned in parts of the US about 10 years ago. It started in New York state, and the judge even made the order take effect immediately. This caused quite a scare in the miniatures industry, and many manufacturers switched to a lead free mix, which raised the price on miniatures. After a number of years, the restrictions got overruled, but they could go back in at any time, and manufacturers have chosen not to put the lead back in.

t-tauri
30-07-2006, 09:23
I'm not sure if the NY ruling ever actually reached legal status but the wave of panic through the US industry (Palladium alloy and lead free pewter) signalled the end for mass market lead. A lot of small wargames producers who only sell through specialist shops still use lead.

The lead content is also restricted by European toy safety legislation. The little CE logo for toy safety couldn't be used on lead containing products so GW lead minis would have to be sold as collector's items and not through toy shops.

Lead containing casting metals are a much better medium for conversions as it's softer and easier to work. Of course, it's also poisonous. Some of GW's early casts when they dropped lead were like toughened steel to cut and file. ;) That's improved over the years.

RobC
30-07-2006, 15:17
Back in the day, certain GW stores wouldn't sell miniatures to kids because of the obligatory 'not for use by under-16s' warning. It's no wonder that GW moved to a lead-free alloy when they realised how much it was restricting their sales.

revford
30-07-2006, 15:33
GW's White Metal does not use lead. I believe its iilegal to use lead in figures manufactured/sold in Europe.

Additonally GW made a big thing of their metals being lead free a few years ago.

Indeed, you can't sell toys made of lead in the UK. GW gets a tax break for being a toy company rather than a luxury goods company.

So drop the lead and they stop being a luxury goods (collectors item) seller and become a toy company, get a cool tax break for doing so.

They already had moved to white metal in the US and maybe other markets, so there was no reason not to switch.