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View Full Version : Give me a rundown of Necromunda



Riptacus
03-02-2007, 22:10
I play Mordheim and 40K, so you can use those as reference points.

How does the game play in general? Do the rules favour either shooting or close combat? I would prefer to make a shooty gang, but I won't bother if it won't be competitive/fun to play.

How do the different gangs stack up against each other? Post rankings if you like. So far I like The Enforcers, but the 5 man limitation seems like it may be unfair, especially in campaign play. Is that true?

Galdur Hrafnsson
04-02-2007, 10:28
If you've ever played 2nd ed. 40k, the rules are very similar. I prefer more balanced gangs, but it varies from person to person. As long as you don't make a las wall, it'll be fun. Have a couple of combat guys, because you'll find that some of your gang will roll advances that make them better in combat anyway.

Enforcers are more of a GM thing. They're not really that well built for use as a normal gang. I love the house gangs, myself. They've been there from the start, I like to show them some love.

Where are you from? Might be able to hook you up with fellow necro players.

Darkhorse
04-02-2007, 11:47
2nd Ed 40K favoured hand to hand, and you'd expect the tight scenery to favour HtH, but in the last 4 weeks I've only got into 1 close combat.
Shooting is viable.
Regardless of this however most of the game tends to be running from A to B to get the firing positions.

Lord Humongous
04-02-2007, 16:14
Shooty gangs have a strong edge unless the players intentionally use terrain that allows for a lot of blocked LOS movement. Its just so much easier to spot a target in range (often 24 inches) than to be in range to charge. As campaigns progress, this become more true- shooting gets MUCH more effective with higher BS, but there's not a whole lot you can do to make it easier to charge (it happens, but can often be dealt with through superior firepower).

That said, I like HtH gangs; I just build a lot of chunky terrain. Most folks like playing with lots of terrain.

The Enforcers are certainly not at an unfair disadvantage. Many of the scenarios do not allow use of your entire gang- you might get (say) d6+3 guys. In those cases, the fact that the enforcers get 5 bad-ass dudes vs maybe half the enemies gang really works to their advantage.
However, enforcers a bit limiting compared to other gangs, and cut out a portion of the games post-game strategy, so they may be less fun in that sense. My impression is they are intended as a gang for folks who don't want the "hassle" of a complex post-game, but want more depth than the spyre hunters provide.

Kedlav
05-02-2007, 05:33
After quite a few years of play and moving from the bottom of the dung heap to the top, Necromunda is a very different game than just about anything GW currently offers (Mordheim is closest, but the mechanics aren't quite the same). The variety of weapons, the similarity of everyone at start, and the heap of terrain on the table make for a lot of fun. For a newbie starter, I usually reccomend playing either Orlocks or Van Saar. Both can be very strong in shooting, with Van Saar taking th cake there, while Orlocks are the most versatile gang. Tactics-wise, I've found going with numbers and reliability win the game. This doesn't necessarily mean lasguns exclusively, but they tend to be the predominant basic weapon.

Some basic tips:

-Don't go with anything but a Heavy Stubber. It has more than enough firepower.
-Autopistols are the best pistol, Lasguns the best basic weapon. Don't use them exclusively (beardy), but most juves/gangers should be toting these
-Shotguns are versatile, but versatility costs credits and doesn't win games. One guy with manstoppers is all you need unless you're looking at ten spyrer gangs in the campaign
-Keep 6-8 gangers on the roster. If you have 5-6 and you have a couple go out, you won't be able to work territories, which leaves you short on cash, which leaves you screwed for the late game.
-Juves, if they get a weapon, get an autopistol and that's it.
-Heavies on overwatch need a hand flamer. A guy gets close that you're not expecting and he gets within 2", BOOM, pinned. Next turn, he gets Heavy Stubber to the face. Sick combo.

Darkhorse
05-02-2007, 19:01
Some basic tips:

-Don't go with anything but a Heavy Stubber. It has more than enough firepower.
-Autopistols are the best pistol, Lasguns the best basic weapon. Don't use them exclusively (beardy), but most juves/gangers should be toting these
-Shotguns are versatile, but versatility costs credits and doesn't win games. One guy with manstoppers is all you need unless you're looking at ten spyrer gangs in the campaign
-Keep 6-8 gangers on the roster. If you have 5-6 and you have a couple go out, you won't be able to work territories, which leaves you short on cash, which leaves you screwed for the late game.
-Juves, if they get a weapon, get an autopistol and that's it.
-Heavies on overwatch need a hand flamer. A guy gets close that you're not expecting and he gets within 2", BOOM, pinned. Next turn, he gets Heavy Stubber to the face. Sick combo.

I'm going to have to disagree with you here, The heavy stubber is IMHO a waste of creds. It may be an acceptable weapon for a first gang but there are far better options once you have some experience and understanding of the system. Most gangs take one almost as a knee-jerk, of course this means that neither side has an advantage and you're 180 creds down on the deal.
I think the special weapons list offers better pieces than anything in the heavy section.
Next up the shotgun, 95%+ you'll firing manstoppers. That's a lot of killing power compared to the las, which does translate into a far higher kill rate as your gang advances. Most firefights erupt at about 12" range, well inside the shotgun's max. If it's reliability you're worried about most heavies can take techno skills and leaders too (If you're using the old skill tables and not the new ones with "Leader" and "Heavy" skills.)

Catferret
05-02-2007, 19:44
I disagree with the Heavy Stubber response. I am an experienced Necro player and have moved back to the Heavy Stubber after playing with the Plasma Leader and 2 Flamer Heavies for years.

The Stubber has a great range and high rate of fire making it a great support weapon for covering fire for the rest of my gang who engage in short range firefights.

Kedlav
07-02-2007, 05:35
I'm going to have to disagree with you here, The heavy stubber is IMHO a waste of creds. It may be an acceptable weapon for a first gang but there are far better options once you have some experience and understanding of the system. Most gangs take one almost as a knee-jerk, of course this means that neither side has an advantage and you're 180 creds down on the deal.
I think the special weapons list offers better pieces than anything in the heavy section.
Next up the shotgun, 95%+ you'll firing manstoppers. That's a lot of killing power compared to the las, which does translate into a far higher kill rate as your gang advances. Most firefights erupt at about 12" range, well inside the shotgun's max. If it's reliability you're worried about most heavies can take techno skills and leaders too (If you're using the old skill tables and not the new ones with "Leader" and "Heavy" skills.)

I'll agree that manstoppers are more effective than las, but they are more unreliable. I keep a guy or two around with them (unless we've got a bunch of spyrers, then its almost all manstoppers). Generally speaking, I've never needed more than 3 high-powered shooting weapons, as I've found it better to get a volume of guys shooting at one as opposed to having just one. Its much easier to do this with a shotgun-light force. It also depends on terrain. For the main campaign themed fights, there's usually a ton of terrain around here, but for the regular fights, there's a good amount, but not enough that the longer range isn't a benefit.

As far as special weapons over the stubber, I play Van Saar, use hidden hand flamers on overwatch(special/heavy toters), and usually roll a ton of specialists, so I'm never too terribly concerned about special weapons and flamers..

Darkhorse
07-02-2007, 17:41
Well that's VS for you...
I definately agree that massed firepower is what counts, individually the lads don't seem able to hit the side of a barn. I've never had any problem achieving this with shotguns ( I have 5 in gang ATM) Though my Delaque infiltration skills may have something to do with this...
VS shotguns probably aren't in character, being somewhat low tech.
Whether or not you agree with my strategy it seems to be working, I've been 2nd or 3rd in the local campaign from the 2nd game onwards, (19 gangs in campain, all houses plus Scavvies, Ratskins and 2 custom gangs) No one's died in my gang, I'm still averaging 1 kill a game and the heavy plasma gunner is developing something of a reputation being responsible for 2 of those deaths. I have aquired more territory than I can work (9 sites, I have 7 gangers and 3 Juves).
Tactics are what win, equipment is less important than a good plan.

Kedlav
08-02-2007, 05:43
yea, its definately the tic-tacs. I can see how massed shotguns on a skilled out Delaque gang can be a rather scare combination, but I've found that in the main, using mass shotguns isn't quite as effective as las/auto with a shotgun or two.

Kinda curious as to why you decided to waste creds on a heavy plasma gun. Its really ******* expensive, it doesn't knock down buildings too well, the template isn't big enough to grab more than one guy, etc. I've always had issues with him being more a credsink...

Extra territory isn't bad, its always nice to have those vents and tunnels but not have to take the money hit for them...

Eazy-O
08-02-2007, 12:16
Guys, he wants a rundown... :)

The gameplay in general is pretty smooth, it can get a bit tricky with Line Of Sight problems, but once you get used to your terrain, it's a breeze. Games can last from half an hour to an hour and a half, i'd say. Add some pre an post game sequence, if you're playing a campaign game. :)

It pretty much depends on terrain whether close combat or shooting is favored, needless to say you should have a good terrain set that allows for balanced play. Some open areas, some vantage points, some difficult terrain... You get the picture.

The different gangs are supposed to be balanced, at least the 6 main house gangs are. I'd recommend any of those to a beginner, just pick whichever style you like the best. Enforcers really are more of an arbitrator tool i think, but they can still be fun to play. You won't be able to enjoy all the game's aspects though.

As far as i'm concerned, Necromunda is among the best (if not the best) thing GW gave us. It allows for great modelling and terrain building opportunities and when you form a campaign group allows for great house rules and special events.

Oh, and here's an article on Eastern Fringe you might wanna read if you're considering Necromunda. :) http://easternfringe.com/forum/portal.php?page=5

Have fun,
Oskar

Darkhorse
08-02-2007, 18:21
Kinda curious as to why you decided to waste creds on a heavy plasma gun. Its really ******* expensive, it doesn't knock down buildings too well, the template isn't big enough to grab more than one guy, etc. I've always had issues with him being more a credsink...
Credsink, yeah maybe I started with 9 members whereas most other gangs in the campaign started with 11. However it is better than a lascannon which is what the model was originally armed with. As I've already said I'm unconviced of the merits of the h.stubber, I've seen more than one battle devolve into a stubber-stubber shootout with tactics non existant, unless standing in the open and shooting the enemy heavy who is also standing in the open, counts as tactics.:rolleyes:
If i had converted a second model with plasmagun for the start of the campaign my heavy might well have taken it, I do like the extra stopping power of High Impact weaponry and I do catch people who clump their fighters, including a H.stubber armed heavy standing next to his leader last game, also a flamer armed heavy standing next to a ganger, plus a pair of juves hanging around together in yet another game.
It might seem obvious not to bunch up in front of a heavy plasma gun but people still do it.:eyebrows:
It's difficult to tell how much value for money you get from weapons in Necro, but this seems to work and it suits my style (semi-sniper role).

Kedlav
09-02-2007, 16:53
Heh, yea, if people are stupid enough to bunch up around a H. Plasma, then by its definately worth it, and it surely is better than a Lascannon IMO. As far as the Heavy Stubber goes, well, use it right and it can be useful. I don't use it to go targeting heavies, that's what infiltrators/vents/tunnels/Snipers (ZOMG I love rolling these up as Van Saar) guys are good for. I've always used them to draw attention and to cover my advance as I get to the firing positions I want. The bottom line of them to me is the fact that they're the cheapest heavy weapon, have oodles of killing ability still, and work well with the hidden hand flamer on overwatch (a tactic I still work after finding it out four years ago, and its still just as effective to this day...)

Bubble Ghost
09-02-2007, 18:42
The game plays similarly to Mordheim but has a more natural, sort of organic flow to it. It's just more mobile, because of the way many smaller differences in the rule set combine together. The injury and recovery rules, for example (they're random. You can suffer a flesh wound, go down, or out of action - and if you go down, you have to roll on the injury chart in each recovery phase rather than getting back up on a set time frame, so there's no certainty when or even if you'll recover. And in the meantime you can at least crawl around bleeding); or the follow up move (you get a 2" move after taking out a close combat opponent, letting you dive for cover), which combines with the fact that everyone has a gun to eliminate the "stand one guy in a ridiculous place because you know exactly where the enemy will be after they kill him" manoeuvre; or the fact that almost everyone has a ranged weapon and there's no penalty for moving and shooting, meaning gangs don't split into ranged and combat halves as cleanly; or the pinning rule, which means weight of fire and having your fighters support each other is far more important. Bottom line is Mordheim is clean, precise and predictable, and puts more emphasis on planning; Necromunda is more fluid and chaotic, with more emphasis on everyone mucking in with all the jobs and making it up as you go along.

Those are biggest differences to the 'feel' of the gameplay. The theme of unpredictability is carried over into the post-game bit, which is a lot more random than Mordheim's system. Mordheim is a solely tactical exercise, many of its elements combining to encourage cold, analytical play in which you don't really give a toss what happens as long as you win and don't have to shell out too much for new fighters. Necromunda, on the other hand, attaches a lot more personality and importance to your individual fighters. They develop the way they want to, and you find whatever you find - you don't get to hunt exclusively for that needle rifle you want. The higher level of randomness can be a bit of a cold shower for some who make the jump from Mordheim to Necromunda but it's worth persevering with, because for me it means the gangs, and consequently the whole game, develops a lot more individuality and personality.

Bottom line is that both gameplay styles suit their games' background - the cold-hearted Mordheim mercenary calculatedly sacrificing his unwitting henchmen in the pursuit of cash, and the Necromunda gang simply struggling to get by, helping each other out and hopefully getting rich while they're at it. For me, Necromunda is the better game for it, because its atmosphere better suits attachment to your gang, important for an involving campaign.

Anyway. Any of the house gangs are good. There's arguably a skew towards those whose gangers can choose shooting skills, but they'll all do fine, especially if you make sure you use enough terrain (plus players are at liberty to insist on using the treacherous conditions rules, and shooting gangs are invariably the first ones to suffer when the environment goes wrong). I don't have a lot of experience of the others but I've never found any one gang to be particularly dominant (I've played in campaigns with Redemptionist, Scavvy, Pit Slave and Spyrer gangs), and if you have a campaign arbitrator/GM/whatever, he can do all sorts of nasty things to people who threaten the spirit of the game...