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Jonathan =I=
15-08-2005, 18:41
Edit - (sorry this may need to be moved to other GW discussion)

Now this may be a stupid question but I have always wondered why GW (and other companies) donít cast all there metal models in resin?

With pressure casting you wont get any annoying air bubbles on the model and much finer detail can be achieved and more complex "blister pack" models made (titan Tech priest).
Wont it be cheaper in the long run then the centrifugally cast metal minis? And wont the shipping costs be lower or am I way off?

TheOneWithNoName
15-08-2005, 18:43
Now this may be a stupid question but I have always wondered why GW (and other companies) donít cast all there metal models in resin?

With pressure casting you wont get any annoying air bubbles on the model and much finer detail can be achieved and more complex "blister pack" models made (titan Tech priest).
Wont it be cheaper in the long run then the centrifugally cast metal minis? And wont the shipping costs be lower or am I way off?

Maybe it has to do with the health issues... and you know how the youngin's love the models. :angel:

Marty D
15-08-2005, 18:50
and think of the costs for models - oh god the costs!

Brimstone
15-08-2005, 18:50
Because resin is expensive to cast and labour intensive for high volume products

Metal is cheaper and more automated, the only downside is that the moulds wear out quicker.

Plastic is expensive to set up but once you are in production production costs are very cheap.

Therefore for high value/low volume products resin is best i.e. Forgeworld.

For low volume/low'ish value products metal is best i.e. HQ units, special characters

For high volume/low value products plastic is best i.e. troop choice selections.

And no comments on pricing thank you.

Pertinax
15-08-2005, 20:49
Also, as a newly started resin caster myself, the resin moulds are not invinicible either. Details to wear. And thus, if you produce any quantity of resin parts, you might very well be looking at replacing the moulds regularly. Much more regularly than the "pink" silicone that the metal casting uses.

Minister
15-08-2005, 22:20
Resin also tends to take knocks badly compred to lumps of lead, in my experience, and as stated above the health issues stop anyone under 16 (or is it 18?) being sold the models.

DaR
16-08-2005, 01:30
Aside from the health concerns, from a pure technical standpoint:

Metals are just as easy and faster to cast (cooling takes a few minutes, compared to the 10 to 15 it takes for resins to completely set), assuming you have a proper set up, and miscasts can be just melted down and reused. The finished models are much more durable and easier to package. The molds themselves last about as long (metal slowly burns away the mold, resin slowly leaches moisture out of it, either way you have to replace the casting mold from a master every couple hundred of castings). The resin materials themselves, assuming you use a semi-standard two parter, is about as expensive and much more sensitive to its storage conditions prior to use than the tin alloy used for metal (needs to be refridgerated or used very quickly, can't be stored anywhere damp or bright).

Plastics are about as durable, much cheaper to cast, and offer all the same benefits as resins (except for the very very very finest of details, and with the new plastics processes in use now, even those can be done in) to the modeller. They can be cast even faster in molds that wear out much less frequently (10s or hundreds of thousands of impressions). The only downside is that the molds are carved and etched steel and vastly more expensive than those for resins and metals, on the order of 10s of thousands of USD compared to hundreds of USD in terms of material and labor. Which is why they don't simply make plastics of everything and save themselves a small fortune in transport costs. As an aside, I do maintain they could probably do really well for a lot of the things that currently in blisters if they'd make molds that simply had 2 or 3 copies of several different character/elites on them, and then break the mold up and put them into blisters, the way they used to do with some models in the smaller boxes. Heroes and Characters would be prime for this treatment, as most people only need one or two, but almost everybody wants one or two. Probably not worth it for the rarer and less useful specialty units. You'd go broke trying to sell Krootox that way.

-DaR