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View Full Version : The great cunondrem i faced



Shuya
10-04-2005, 05:15
I am up tonight thinking, for a brief period of time i was known as a "mosher" and i do hate that term becuase it classifiys a diversity of people, most of witch i hate (for example mini-moshers who think pink makes u look cool) but i have always thought there were big differences between said "moshers/goths/emo's etc" and "chavs/wannabes/pikeys/townies/trevs etc" but as ive matured into my late 50's (im not kidding i feel like a 50year old even though i should be a horney teenage boy) i have come to realise there are only 2 minute differences that cause so mutch trouble, music and cloths

Now i was told when i hung round with the most annoying of people that all "chavs" dress alike listen to the same music and insult/beat up people just because they are differnt etc

now my best friend is a chav and most his mates are mini moshers and moshers and i know many more people who are cool chavs to talk to and i know many goths and moshers and ESPECIALLY minimoshers who insult and beat up all chavs and normal people, for not dressing like them and listening to there music,

but heres what really gets me

chavs say all moshers dress alike (im using theese two terms to genralize) chavs are right

moshers say all chavs dress alike ( not all but most) theese moshers are right

chavs say moshers just hang round causing trouble, there right (remember most not all)
and visa versa

this comes up for so many topics, and I do here this from alot of chavs and moshers, mostley the ones who are obsessed with there image, but i here it alot from almost all moshers muttering under there breath

what annoys me is that i feel im the only person who sees this Chav-Vs-Moshers thing this way.


wow i feel better,

m1s1n
10-04-2005, 06:06
I can barely read what you write because of your font choice. Maybe a little less with the italics and more with the capital letters?

I have always found it to be extremely bizarre--people's insistence on labeling and stereotyping. It is really a method of objectifying individuals into a series of cliches and concepts rather than looking at the individual. I think we do this because it makes it easier to pass judgements of distrust or approval through these objectifications. For example: "He dresses like me, we must have a lot in common--I think I like this person!" and "He doesn't dress like me, so we are nothing alike--he probably thinks the same about me!" I think it is foolish and dangerous to label people, and the best thing to do is find a way to move beyond those descriptors.

I'm from the States--so I don't know what a "chav", "mosher", "minimosher" or the rest of it is. I'm sure we have similar gimmicky names and labels that are synonyms for the equivilant--and I find them to be just as stupid and evil. I think it is a lot easier to get along with people when you look beyond their titles.

Not that this directly addresses your situation, but I do feel there is some hope in society moving beyond stupid labels--someday. Anyway, your homework assignment is to watch "West Side Story" and Baz Lurhman's "Romeo + Juliet". Then show them to ten friends and instruct them to do the same. If they are smart they will realize that they have just watched the same movie twice. If they are at some higher level of genius they will relate it enough to their own lives to make a difference in how they approach others.

The boyz
10-04-2005, 12:12
You are always going to get people, who hang around together who share the same interest in fashion, music etc. So of course there will start to be some sort of rivalry(sp) between these different groups of people. For instance "Chavs" and "Goffs".Two groups of people, who dress completeley different and have a cifferent taste in music and a different stance on life.
You are always going to get people who, have the same interests and fashion sense hanging around. Wether this be for good or bad is another reason.
For instance if we take a look back in time, in the sixties and seventys you had the Mods and the Rockers and Greasers.Then going into the eighties you had skin heads.

You are always going to get groups of people who share a common interest hanging around and through some sort of rivalry start to hate other groups of people who are different to them.

For example, at my college there are the Farmers(me) and footballers and Golfers and for some unknown reason we all seam to disagree with each other. And start fighting. And I have know idea why this is.Even though we do probably share the same interests in music and we all like to play football etc. It just seem to be some sort of rivalry that has been built up over the years at college, and is carried on down the years.All because we do different courses at college.

arxhon
10-04-2005, 18:34
I'd like to make some intelligent comments, but seriously, fontsize 9 italic Times New Roman is not a good font for reading on the web. Hence, i skipped over it entirely.

The color, however, is fine. :)

Here's a quick "fontography" lesson for you. :) Italics slow down the reader as he's scanning across the line of text. This is why they are used for emphasis. Text that is entirely in italics may look cool, but it's a slog to read.

Certain fonts do not render well on screen at small sizes because of pixelization. Times new roman is one of these. If you'll take a look around on the web, you'll find that most pages use Verdana, Arial or some other similar font because these are easier to read onscreen. Technically, Verdana is a superior font because it was designed for onscreen reading (this is the font used on portent, for example) and handles size changes better, and can be used at a size as small as 9 pixels, where most other fonts start to alias badly around 10 points (pixels are smaller than points), and odd numbered sizes really screw them up

The medium isn't the message, but if the medium is incomprehensible, the message is lost.

m1s1n
10-04-2005, 18:54
Also--

co·nun·drum
1. A riddle in which a fanciful question is answered by a pun.
2. A paradoxical, insoluble, or difficult problem; a dilemma: “the conundrum, thus far unanswered, of achieving full employment without inflation” (Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr.).

I'm not sure if your situation is really a conundrum--it seems more like life.