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Thread: A soldier will fight long and hard for a bit of coloured lead. - Sigur's Napoleonics

  1. #21
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    Re: A soldier will fight long and hard for a bit of coloured lead. - Sigur's Napoleon

    Depending on what sort of tables you play on, why not make the bases scenic - little bushes, trees, bits of fence? I'm sure I've seen some cake decorations that would be suitable for the fence, any 10 or 8mm trees should work, and a hedge could be made out of some PVA-soaked string being coiled around a pencil.
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  2. #22
    Chapter Master Easy E's Avatar
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    Re: A soldier will fight long and hard for a bit of coloured lead. - Sigur's Napoleon

    Those will look sweet on the tabletop Sigur.

    Are you trying to replicate the units from the scenario in the mainbook?
    Do you like free wargames?
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  3. #23
    Chapter Master sigur's Avatar
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    Re: A soldier will fight long and hard for a bit of coloured lead. - Sigur's Napoleon

    @jbeil: Thanks. Yeah, some small bushes will be in order. For other things I'll have to see about the space I got on the bases. For now I ordered some extra short static grass on top of everything I got, then - when I find the time - I'll try out stuff.

    @Easy E: Thanks, I hope so. The weird thing is that in recent days 28mm looks better and better to me. But I guess I'm just sick of the look of 6mm dudes en masse and fall into the traps of interweb pictures. It certainly would be better advertisement if I painted 28mm only, that's for sure. Oh well. I'm not replicating any particular scenario or battle really. Just a large portion of infantry, a nice amount of any cavalry and artillery required and that's it pretty much.

  4. #24
    Chapter Master sigur's Avatar
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    Re: A soldier will fight long and hard for a bit of coloured lead. - Sigur's Napoleon

    ...and we're back. Hope everybody had a pleasant summer.

    In the meantime I finished basing my little armymen.

    Some of the infantry:



    ...and a unit of infantry and cavalry (Chasseurs Cheval) side by side:


    The cavalry will also get strips of 10mm depth in front of them to get them to the 80x60mm format like the other units.

  5. #25
    Chapter Master sigur's Avatar
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    Re: A soldier will fight long and hard for a bit of coloured lead. - Sigur's Napoleon

    Next I painted a few (3) units of Dragoons:



    ...and two more units of infantry and two massed batteries of horse artillery:



    Here we got the cavalry all based. Light cavalry (chasseurs cheval and Hussars) in the back, Dragoons in the front.


    ...and a closer look at the Dragoons:


    Let's talk about Dragoons while we're at it.



    Wer waren die Dragoner?

    Dragoons were line cavalry, so 'standard cavalry', in the French army. After the Chasseurs Cheval they were the most numerous horse-mounted soldiers in the army.

    Originating in the 17th century, Dragoons were an invention of the Thirty Years War and pretty much infantry with horses under their bums. They were armed as infantry, they were clothed as infantry (flat shoes instead of boots, they even had drums instead of buglers/trumpeters as cavalry does) and they fought on foot as infantry. The horses were soley a means to get from one point to another quickly. They were regiments which were cheap to set up and maintain and were a very flexible tactical asset. They became very popular with the emerging national armies of Europe and soon regular Dragoon regiments were set up as fixtures.


    Dragoons in Napoleonic times

    By Napoleon's times the job of Dragoons had changed. They had become real actual cavalry. This in part had to to with the fact that due to advanced drill and training infantry in the late 18th/early 19th century was able to move and redeploy much faster than in prior centuries, so the mounted infantryman lost its calue. So Dragoons acquired the boots of horsemen, trumpets and straight, heavy cavalry swords of heavy shock infantry. Still, Dragoons weren't the best of horsemen, because the focus of their training still as in equal parts fighting on foot as on horseback. As mentioned in my text about the Chasseurs Cheval, all of French infantry received limited training for infanteristic combat, but the Dragoons did so especially. They also kept longer muskets than the shorter carbines Chasseurs Cheval used.

    French Dragoons on foot:


    With this neither-this-nor-that status and their large numbers Dragoons always were a red-headed step-child of the French cavalry. On top of this their uniform was comparatively plain. That being said, I think their helmets in that neo-grecan style with the black horsehair look amazing.


    Guard Dragoons reenactors

    Napoleon constantly had trouble getting enough horses for his Dragoons (all of the cavalry really at some points). In 1812 the situation was so dire that infantry officers received orders to hand their horses over to the Dragoons. The French army in general were a little careless with their horses (with the exception of the Poles of course who were allies to the French and a fixture in their army). They weren't the greatest horsemen either (again, with the exception of the Polish units), but made up for this with courage, sprit de corps and mainly superior tactics and training. French cavalry, including the Dragoons, distinguished themselves in battle again and again.




    Uniforms

    Dragons wore green uniforms and white breeches (other colours in Spain, whatever was at hand) and copper coloured helmets with brown fur turbans (panther immitation [very rarely actual] fur for offiers and the guards regiments). Cuffs, collar and turnovers were coloured either green, scarlet, crimson, pink, yellow or orange, depending on the regiment.

  6. #26
    Chapter Master kublai's Avatar
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    Re: A soldier will fight long and hard for a bit of coloured lead. - Sigur's Napoleon

    Just amazing sigur ! Love it !

  7. #27
    Chapter Master sigur's Avatar
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    Re: A soldier will fight long and hard for a bit of coloured lead. - Sigur's Napoleon

    @kublai: Thanks, Sir! Good to see you again on here.

    ...on to the horse artillery!




    Uniforms of horse artillerymen were much more lavish than the uniforms of the regular artillerists. Eversince its introduction as a regular arm of armies of Europe, the artillery always as a very technical and pragmatic affair with little romance or poetry to it. For practical reasons artillery uniforms were always dark and slightly drab. Working with powder and grease and tools and standing in a cloud of smoke all the time would have turned any uniform dark and drab sooner or later.

    Horse artillery enjoyed a certain elite status among their colleagues and their uniforms were based on the same designs as Hussar uniforms (somehow they had managed to 'make artillery cool'), whereas drivers and artillery train personnel in general wore steel grey uniforms.

    Mobile artillery tactics reach back to the times of the Thirty Years War, but the first regular regiments of horse artillery weren't introduced until the mid-18th century. The concept is pretty sweet: You get your artillery batteries to be mobile and able to redeploy at massive speeds. This requires a lot of special training, but tactically it's a brilliant thing to have once it works. Especially if they're assumed to be cavalry from the front and enemy infantry forms square. Then they quickly turn around, deploy cannons and open fire at the surprised enemy lines.


    well, that's horse artillery. Here's a photo of the new infantry units along with some of the existing ones:



    Okay, i made a little mistake with one of the units in this picture. I hope it's nigh impossible to spot it. With these two new units I now have 12 infantry units. Plus 3 units light cavalry, 3 units of battle cavalry (Dragoons) and two units of massed horse artillery.


    Here you can see why I based the way I did:



    A unit of line infantry with some battalion gun support, depicted by a single horse artillery gun added. The gap on the other side I fill with an empty 20x20mm base. This way I can depict attached artillery to the unit or, by using two empty 20x20bases to the sides of the frontal infantry base I can have smaller or reduced infanty units. For some variety I can add single officers or scenic objects to the empty filler bases.


    Hope you like them stuff so far!

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    Chapter Master mrtn's Avatar
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    Re: A soldier will fight long and hard for a bit of coloured lead. - Sigur's Napoleon

    Great work on your tiny Frenchmen.

    BTW, there's a thread where you can ask for your threads to be moved to the right subforum, they're dumped in the main project logs forum now thanks to a crash.

  9. #29
    Chapter Master sigur's Avatar
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    Re: A soldier will fight long and hard for a bit of coloured lead. - Sigur's Napoleon

    @mrtn: Thanks. I know that, but I thought I'd wait for Warseer to be fully functional (ie the img-tags to be fixed and the not-staying-logged-in thing) before I bother the good people with individual requests.

  10. #30
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    Re: A soldier will fight long and hard for a bit of coloured lead. - Sigur's Napoleon

    These are really nice! Maybe I should try to persuade some of my mates to try napoleonics so I could aswell...
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  11. #31
    Chapter Master sigur's Avatar
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    Re: A soldier will fight long and hard for a bit of coloured lead. - Sigur's Napoleon

    @Bergioyn: Thanks very much and good luck. It can be a bit of a hard sell, but it's kinda cool. I'm starting to understand how people sometimes just disappear into Napoleonics for decades. It's such a huge field and there are so many brilliant sources for the time.

    Right, in October VIVAT, Austria's premier historical wargaming show, took place again, including the aftermath of last year's huge Waterloo game. Here's my report of that show:

    http://www.battlebrushstudios.com/20...ivat-2016.html



    Thanks for having a look! :-)

  12. #32
    Chapter Master sigur's Avatar
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    Re: A soldier will fight long and hard for a bit of coloured lead. - Sigur's Napoleon

    You may remember how I ordered a few 6mm buildings from Baccus along with my first batch of minis. A few weeks after VIVAT I got an excuse for painting 'em up to use for a test game of Baroque (the Pike&Shot period version of Impetus, finally released earlier this year).



    Of course we played that with my 10mm Thirty Years Wars collection, but the 6mm buildings fit rather well.





    Here's a shot of the table right before the start of the game:

  13. #33
    Chapter Master sigur's Avatar
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    Re: A soldier will fight long and hard for a bit of coloured lead. - Sigur's Napoleon

    Okay, to quickly get back on topic (somewhat) - in between I did a little commission project for someone. It's Napoleonics, so I can throw it in here.


    It's a unit of 18 12th Light Dragoons (The Prince of Wales') on foot:


    (the 10th rather than the 12th, but uniforms and colours were pretty much the same)



    Wasn't allowed to base them, but the customer was pretty taken with the results and swore to do his best to give them appropriately pretty basing. and I know the guy does these things really well, I've seen his minis.

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    Chapter Master sigur's Avatar
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    Re: A soldier will fight long and hard for a bit of coloured lead. - Sigur's Napoleon

    I'm also just very good at this in general. :-P

    So the latest thing I did on this project was to prepare a bunch of line Voltigeurs in greatcoats. Thing is I ran out of bases for them, so I have to wait until I get new ones.



    I also did two massed batteries of foot artillery.


  16. #36
    Chapter Master sigur's Avatar
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    Re: A soldier will fight long and hard for a bit of coloured lead. - Sigur's Napoleon

    Hello one and all! Hope all of you made it well through the holidays and on into 2017!



    Happy New Year!


    Over the holidays I managed to get quite a lot of stuff done, among it the last glaring omission for my 6mm French army: The Cuirassiers.




    Cuirassiers were straight-up, just like their sabres. They wore steel helmets and steel cuirasses (breast- and backplate). The usefulness of those already is a matter of ongoing discussions as many European armies got rid of the actual armour and helmets on their Curiassiers over the course of the 18th century. Cuirassiers in the 18th century only (if at all) wore breastplate and cross-shaped reinforcements undeneath their hats. Napoleon increased the number of Cuirassier regiments remarkably when the came to power, introduced new (and dead cool looking) steel helmets and reintroduced the full cuirass (front and back). Quite to the contrary of most other European armies of the time. The Austrian cuirassiers for example only wore breastplate, British to my knowledge didn't wear armour at all (but household regiments were issued cuirasses after Waterloo). So the breastplate must have impressed in some regards. In hand to hand combat it undoubtedly had its uses whereas protecting against musket fire (at close distance at least) was out of the question. Apart from that the horses were vulnerable to fire anyway, so it seems like the purpose of the cuirass was to deflect enemy blows in hand to hand combat.

    The steel helmet was similar to the Dragoons' helmet in design, but made of steel with a black fur turban instead of a brown one.



    The uniform was the usual French dark blue with red details around the cuirass. Regimental colours were to be found on the collar, cuffs (often covered up by the big white gloves though), turnbacks and sheepskins on the saddle.


    (note the cornet's flag compared to the ones on my minis. Mine display the later version.)


    Cuirassiers were big, burly guys on the biggest and burliest horses. If possible darker horses were issued this heavy cavalry.



    The main weapon of the cuirassier was the straight heavy cavalry sabre which was designed for thrusting rather than slashing. They were also armed with two pistols and later on were issued carbines, but neither found much use and after being issued cavalry carbines cuirassiers went out of their way to get rid of them as soon as possible. Even the pistols weren't used much to the point that many cuirassiers didn't even care to carry ammunition for them. The single purpose of the cuirassier was the shock charge en masse, break infantry formations and through enemy lines and make their battle line collapse.

    The great advantage of the French cuirassiers was the good training and solid tactics. While British battle cavalry was usually pointed somewhere, then went off to hack away passionately at the unfortunate target and either shot off to find the next target or chased routing enemies the French cavalry was much quicker to reform into a body again to prepare the next charge.

    Of course the thing was to find opponents to charge. Linear infantry tactics of the time had formations vulnerable to flank charges or frontal charges (given the defensive fire didn't break the attacker). Once the line had been broken, the formation dissolved in a mess and wasn't fit to work any more, usually with horrifying consequences for the infantrymen. Kinda like it had always been with infantry vs. cavalry. For protection against cavalry attacks infantry formations would form the famous square formation.


    by Mike Switek

    This formation was used by all nations involved in the Napoleonic wars. The idea was pretty much the same as the Hedgehog formation used by Landsknechts and in the 17th century. Problem: Infantry is vulnerable to flank attacks by mobile cavalry. Solution: have no flanks!

    The infantry forms a square (often hollow to protect vital personnel, officers, baggage, ...), in two or more ranks, being able to fire in all directions and deploy bayonets which would make horses shy from charging. The firepower of the formation is not massed in one direction as with the line, but it's very, very hard to penetrate for cavalry (always depending on the training and morale of the infantrymen of course). On the other hand the square is vulnerable to infantry attacks (again: not enough massed firepower for effective defensive fire) and very vulnerable (due to lots of soldiers being huddled together in a tight, deep space) to artillery fire.

    With breech-loading rifles emerging in the second half of the 19th century the square lost its importance to combat cavalry as rifle ranges increased dramatically as well as volume of fire did.



    Yeah, so much for cuirassiers. Apart from that I got the rest of the bases, so I was able to base the Voltigeurs in Greatcoats, do some more blank filler bases as well as filler bases with officers on 20x20mm bases.

    Basically I got all the necessary parts done. I think I could do with some more artillery on foot, but let's see. From that on, everything pretty much is just a cherry on top: Imperial Guard Grenadiers, Guard artillery, Lancers, Napoleon, more infantry, ...

    Oh, and I have to get quite a lot of micro dice holders done. Those will be bases going on the magnetic sheets in the back. In the photo of the cuirassiers I painted the strips of basing in the back will be gone for gaming and replaced with a micro dice holder and a strip of magnetic paper with info on the unit, which corps it belong to and so on.

    I'd love to do army shots soon, but first I should see where I can take them (usually outside, but currently the great outside is all full of snow. ). I should get hold of a background of sorts and last but not least I wanted to get some forests done before I take army shots.

    So yeah, lots of stuff to do.




    edit: If you're on FB - I entered in a GW store painting competition. Not a big thing as winners for the first round are determined by Facebook Likes and I'm pretty sure there's nothing to win but bragging rights. Anyway, if you want to go there, have a look at the entries and maybe shoot your favourite a "Like". ( *cough* I entered the Landship. *cough* )

    https://www.facebook.com/gw.wien1/ph...type=3&theater

  17. #37
    Chapter Master sigur's Avatar
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    Re: A soldier will fight long and hard for a bit of coloured lead. - Sigur's Napoleon

    Hey peeps!

    I'm back with a few pictures of Napoleonic figures I painted (commission stuff). More of the old-school 25mm Minifigs. Here's the National Guard of Warsaw all done (except for a flag of course):





    ...and here's what's on the table now (among other things) - National Guard of Krakow (mostly done really, only need to figure out how to paint the drummer properly). In the back you can see some chaps standing on pots. Those are random artillerymen for Polish regimental guns. Those guys wore the same uniforms as the infantrymen from the corresponding regiments, but with collars and lapels black and regimental colours reflected in the lapel piping.


  18. #38
    Chapter Master sigur's Avatar
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    Re: A soldier will fight long and hard for a bit of coloured lead. - Sigur's Napoleon

    In other news - here are some photos of the collection of the gentleman I paint these old-school minis for (just a small part of it is on display):















    Thought some of you may enjoy the look.


    Also: I've been to Austrian Salute and it was a hoot.

    Here's my report of the show:

    http://www.battlebrushstudios.com/20...lute-2017.html






    Later on I put up an article in which I discuss what I bought on the weekend and in which I more or less effectively try to explain why all of these purchases were very necessary and justified:

    http://skirmishwargaming.com/austria...e-loot-report/




    Right, I hope you enjoy the pictures and the articles.

  19. #39
    Chapter Master sigur's Avatar
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    Re: A soldier will fight long and hard for a bit of coloured lead. - Sigur's Napoleon

    Oh, one more thing!

    Today someone posted two very neat pictures on a Facebook group which are incredibly useful for doing research on Napoleonic uniforms (well, and specific parts of horses):





    Sure this helps. I would have needed this picture half a year ago when I had to figure out what a sabretache is.

  20. #40

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