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Cool_Mint
17-04-2009, 23:39
The Wikipedia history of Games Workshop doesn't quite explain. I'm sure the first Games Workshop store was in the UK and the first ever Golden Demon Awards were also in the UK in 1987 but there was also some kind of partnership back in the 1970's with Ral Partha.

Was Games Workshop bought out by an American company or is it still British - if it ever was?

WD issue 101... cardboard space marine kid. :cool:
Oh.. "aren't you a little short for a stormtrooper?".. :D

Gimp
17-04-2009, 23:44
It was created by 3 british guys i britian so i think british.

Imus
17-04-2009, 23:50
i can see the flame throwers being lit now.

GW is American, much in the same way U571 the film had the americans breaking the enigma code and saying the world.

On a light other note, yes it is indeed a british company, though is owned by the four horsemen of the apocalypse.

chromedog
17-04-2009, 23:54
British.
They did have distribution deals with Milton Bradley (HUGE American board games company) but AFAIK, they are still a 'british' company. Head office in Britain kinda gives it away, too (Yes, they have a US head office, too, but that is purely to control their US operations).

Cool_Mint
17-04-2009, 23:55
So does that mean Citadel Miniatures is (or was) British too? It would be nice to think Britain can lay claim to being the home of the World's most important fantasy/sci-fi games company- D&D not withstanding.

chromedog
17-04-2009, 23:57
Citadel, yes, is british.
They share the same head office as GW. Several board members are the same people.

starlight
18-04-2009, 00:13
Seriously? Really?


GW is a British Publicly Limited Company (Exchange Symbol GAW.A). Technically it is a British company, but ownership is public (most of them are currently British) so the nationalities can shift over time, but the company is bound by British law.

tassiewargamer
18-04-2009, 00:15
Didn't GW also have a deal with TSR and had their products in GW stores.

Lewis
18-04-2009, 00:27
IfI remember right they both distributed and reprinted the games of several other companies...

Cool_Mint
18-04-2009, 00:28
Didn't GW also have a deal with TSR and had their products in GW stores.

Yes, I know back in the 1980's Citadel Miniatures made a lot of miniatures for TSR. Pre-Slotta Slann for example.

Jedi152
18-04-2009, 00:31
Games Workshop is British and always will be, hence the UK spellings, general realistic low fantasy grim feel etc.

It had been here for years and years before they even decided to expand to the US.

Nottingham born and bred.

Lewis
18-04-2009, 00:34
Nottingham born and bred.

To the extent that when WFRP was written many of the character classes were based upon people you could see wandering around Nottingham during the 1980's.

Cool_Mint
18-04-2009, 00:39
In White Dwarf 109 the entry in the Imperial Guard army list mentions that Ratling Snipers can carry a toxin effective against Skaven.
...........

Soap. :D

BTW, by an odd coincidence I happened to buy a copy of WD109 on ebay a couple of days ago.

zoggin-eck
18-04-2009, 00:42
Wow, you live in the UK, play Warhammer etc. and are a member of this forum and had to ask this question? Never thought I'd read something like this mate :)

Seriously, no offense but have you ever read White Dwarf? Well, the precious few pages that aren't advertisements, but it should be obvious.

Cool_Mint
18-04-2009, 00:49
I live in the UK but I've never played Warhammer - too many rules and dice.
I did read White Dwarf but only for the pictures; I started at issue 98-ish and stopped around issue 150.

I only got back into painting minis last year so almost everything is new to me.

LonelyPath
18-04-2009, 01:50
Didn't GW also have a deal with TSR and had their products in GW stores.

Yes, for a number of years GW were the official UK TSR licene holder for their products until TSR opened their own offices in Cambridge. They were also host to trade licences to other firms over time (selling things like Shadowrun, Rune Quest and other such games) until they were stable enough to go solo in the late 1980's.

EDIT - Golden Demon 1987, I remember attending that :) Gods I'm old... lol

Roguebaron
18-04-2009, 02:08
british, but made in china now.

Templar Ben
18-04-2009, 02:15
Games Workshop is British and always will be, hence the UK spellings, general realistic low fantasy grim feel etc.

It had been here for years and years before they even decided to expand to the US.

Nottingham born and bred.

General realistic? Do you mean the lack of maneuver in the games or the fact that people would rather be in HTH then shoot at each other? :angel:


british, but made in china now.

Just the cases, paints, and printed material. The figures are made in the UK and US.

Batwings
18-04-2009, 02:31
Nottingham born and bred.

Actually, London born.

And Citadel were Newark born.

Newark, the only town in the UK that's an anagram of wa*!%r!

Temprus
18-04-2009, 05:04
So does that mean Citadel Miniatures is (or was) British too? It would be nice to think Britain can lay claim to being the home of the World's most important fantasy/sci-fi games company- D&D not withstanding.Plastic Space Marines alone outsell WotC annually, so, yes, I think Britain can make that claim (at least for non-video games).

Wintermute
18-04-2009, 05:26
british, but made in china now.

Not so.

Only paint, tools and rule books are out sourced to China.

Some paint is out sourced to France, the European WD is printed in Poland and minis are produced in the UK and USA.

zedeyejoe
18-04-2009, 06:50
From Wiki which since it is the first paragraph I am surprised was missed :)


Games Workshop Group plc (often abbreviated to GW) is a British game production and retailing company. Games Workshop is one of the largest wargames companies in the world. The company is listed on the London Stock Exchange with the symbol GAW

If you go on the basis of sales, the Americas make up about 25% of GW sales, UK slightly more than that and Europe the biggest market.

Cool_Mint
18-04-2009, 07:45
Games Workshop Group plc (often abbreviated to GW) is a British game production and retailing company. Games Workshop is one of the largest wargames companies in the world. The company is listed on the London Stock Exchange with the symbol GAW

Thanks ZedEye.


It's a Wikispiracy to try and make me look dumb! :eek:
Honestly the last time I read the Wiki for the history of GW I read it from top to bottom and back again looking for that info.

edit*
BTW, if the USA only makes up a quarter of Games Workshops' sales does that mean there is a more popular gaming system in the USA?

Wintermute
18-04-2009, 08:04
BTW, if the USA only makes up a quarter of Games Workshops' sales does that mean there is a more popular gaming system in the USA?

No, it means that three quarters of GW's sales come from the rest of the world ;)

Griefbringer
18-04-2009, 08:14
It also indicates that GW has not managed to reach the same level of market penetration in the US as in the UK home market (if measured by the amount of sales divided by the total population).

RevEv
18-04-2009, 08:56
british, but made in china now.

Sorry - but where do you get this information from?

Apart from a few specials (air gun, gaming mats etc... whose quality was variable to poor) the vast majority of the products are still produced in the UK. This is to maintain the quality of the product (please, no off thread comments re this comment, there are plenty of these already).

As to the history of GW, there is a recent WD with it in (I think it's the 30yrs Edition). I'll look it out and summarise here if no-one else beats me to it.

GW is British BTW.

Jedi152
18-04-2009, 09:51
Nottingham born and bred.

Actually, London born.

And Citadel were Newark born.

Newark, the only town in the UK that's an anagram of wa*!%r!
Really? I knew Citadel was Newark based, it was my understanding that the same guys (Bryan Ansell, Rick Preistley and ... someone else) simply expanded to start Games Workshop in Nottingham as a shop to sell their models, among load of other odd and sods.

Brother Loki
18-04-2009, 10:46
No, the first GW was in Hammersmith. It was started by Steve Jackson & Ian Livingstone (of Fighting Fantasy Gamebooks fame) and someone else. It merged with Bryan Ansell's Citadel Miniatures after a few years. Note that this was a different Steve Jackson from the American founder of Steve Jackson Games.

zedeyejoe
18-04-2009, 10:57
It also indicates that GW has not managed to reach the same level of market penetration in the US as in the UK home market (if measured by the amount of sales divided by the total population).

No. That would only apply if there are more miniature gamers in the USA than the UK. If the numbers are the same then the market penetration would be equal (assuming that US and UK players spend the same amount each).

A chap I used to have as a distributor in the USA said it was because wargaming is for 'winners' and there are not that many winners in the USA. It could also be due to the education system, and the amount of history covered at school.

So my guess is that there are about the same amount of miniature gamers in the USA as in the UK. My results over several years show about the same level of transfer sales in the USA as in the UK.

IJW
18-04-2009, 13:23
IfI remember right they both distributed and reprinted the games of several other companies...
GW started out as the UK importers of games from other countries, mostly the US. They then expanded into stores and licensed products such as the UK versions of Runequest, Paranoia and quite a few others.

In their own little way, even with 'bad' financial performance over the last few years, GW are one of the UK's success stories in a global market.

Griefbringer
18-04-2009, 13:43
No. That would only apply if there are more miniature gamers in the USA than the UK. If the numbers are the same then the market penetration would be equal (assuming that US and UK players spend the same amount each).


Should we define the relevant market only as the existing miniature gamers, or should we consider the gaming, modelling and hobby market at large?

isaac
18-04-2009, 13:55
I did initially think that GW was from the US due to them using inches

Necromancy Black
18-04-2009, 14:16
I did initially think that GW was from the US due to them using inches

Nah, that's just the pommies being archaic.

The only time I ever use the Imperial system is playing warhammer. Thank god that for the most part fractions never come into the game!

blongbling
18-04-2009, 14:27
citadel is now GW, it used to be the miniatures part of GW but is now jsut a trademark used and isnt a seperate company or anything silly like that.

GW doesnt produce any of its main range products in China, everything is either Europe or US produced. They do make some things like paints and figure cases in China but even that is in GW's own facility, staffed with its own management team and staff...no dodgy little back street places

Cherrystone
18-04-2009, 14:29
Nah, that's just the pommies being archaic

Its the most organic form of measurement, cant work with those rigid mm ;)

and the EU has finally allowed us to continue to use them :)

Reaver83
18-04-2009, 15:25
can't believe anyone wouldn't recognise the british humour throughout the game systems!

Templar Ben
18-04-2009, 15:58
Let alone the British spellings. ;)

Cane
18-04-2009, 17:05
Unfortunately for GW and its customers, its British. Only a matter of time before they're bought out though.

starlight
18-04-2009, 17:08
A Management Buy-Out is more likely though...

Lewis
18-04-2009, 17:08
Also if you look at the men in the photos from the rulebooks some of them are fat but none of them are grotesquely obese: British not American.

Jim
18-04-2009, 17:29
Also if you look at the men in the photos from the rulebooks some of them are fat but none of them are grotesquely obese: British not American.

ahhh...funny...

anyhoo...what are the chances of a management buyout?

Jim

Templar Ben
18-04-2009, 18:05
Not high but higher than another company like Hasbro buying them out.

CasperTheGhost
18-04-2009, 18:50
Let alone the British spellings. ;)

What proper English :p Though I agree we do sometime use extra letter for no obvious reason


Unfortunately for GW and its customers, its British. Only a matter of time before they're bought out though.

Why unfortunately?


Also if you look at the men in the photos from the rulebooks some of them are fat but none of them are grotesquely obese: British not American.

Erm last time I checked there were 'grotesquely obese' in Britain* and perfectly normal, healthy people in America. In fact the media (bunch of lies but true for once) moans about it a lot.

And its British.

Casper

*I could make a joke about Scotland but i'm not going to :angel:

parus_ater
18-04-2009, 19:04
*I could make a joke about Scotland but i'm not going to :angel:

Indeed, being a Brummie that would be just asking for trouble :evilgrin:

Why did this get to this many pages? Is moderating dead?

5Pointer
18-04-2009, 19:04
What proper English :p Though I agree we do sometime use extra letter for no obvious reason


The reason is in the history of the language...

And if you want real English, head over West a little bit to the Black Country, closest you'll get to Old English that :)

Wintermute
18-04-2009, 19:11
And if you want real English, head over West a little bit to the Black Country, closest you'll get to Old English that :)

No its not Old English at all.

BTW I'm from the Black Country as well :cool:


Indeed, being a Brummie that would be just asking for trouble :evilgrin:

Why did this get to this many pages? Is moderating dead?

And to prove we are still Modding...

I think this thread has run its course.

Thread Closed

Wintermute