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electricwolf
27-04-2009, 17:02
I know this is being nit-picky but i just noticed something about the Basilisk that's kinda funny. There are no anchors to secure the tank when it fires?

In real life anything that big must have anchors securing it to the ground in order for it to fire or it would jump back or flip over with everyshot.

Tonberry
27-04-2009, 17:05
Clearly it must have plates of unobtainium welded to the underside to subvert the natural laws of physics.

x-esiv-4c
27-04-2009, 17:08
if may or may not need outriggers depending on the recoil system.

nagash66
27-04-2009, 17:08
Clearly it must have plates of unobtainium welded to the underside to subvert the natural laws of physics.

Well da ! :p

Marshal Sinclair
27-04-2009, 17:24
AS90 doesn't have them, same sort of thing.

SimonL
27-04-2009, 17:35
Suspensors. The handwavium explanation for all the ridiculously oversized 40k weapons :D

Bunnahabhain
27-04-2009, 17:37
I though this was going to be a 17th parallel thread about the no listing to the direct fire mode....

You need outriggers on field guns, that weigh a few tons. A self propelled gun, that weights rather more simply doesn't need the extra stability.

The recoil felt by the vehicle will vary with:
The efficiency of the recoil system - muzzle brake, hydraulics, etc...
The size of the Gun( IIRC, a basilisk is supposed to be a 122mm, so not more powerful than the 155mm standard for modern SPGs)
The charge it's being fired with.
The firing angle.

Of course, it it really was size it looks like, ie 300-450mm, then yes, it would flip over any time it was fired....
EDIT, Or as X-esiv-4c points out, the recoil system would fail, and the barrel would rip itself from the mounting, or simlar not good stuff.

x-esiv-4c
27-04-2009, 17:51
The recoil system would fail before the tank would flip over.

wilsonian
27-04-2009, 17:55
The recoil system would fail before the tank would flip over.

I wouldn't like to be the poor chao standing behind it, waiting to unload the spent casing when it fires LOL

Culven
27-04-2009, 18:06
My Basilisks have a dozer blade mounted to the rear of the chassis, under the firing platform. I have yet to have one flip in battle. ;)

AndrewGPaul
27-04-2009, 18:09
Assuming the shell weighs 50kg (possibly overestimating; that's a rough weight for a 150mm shell, and the Earthshaker is only 132mm), the recoil momentum would push the tank back at 1 m/s (equivalent to roughly 2mph). the tank's brakes should easily cope with that, even if there was no recoil damping at all.

x-esiv-4c
27-04-2009, 18:30
Curiously enough the volumes of the recoil housing and recouperator are not the same. Damn you conservation of mass!

electricwolf
27-04-2009, 18:47
I though this was going to be a 17th parallel thread about the no listing to the direct fire mode....

You need outriggers on field guns, that weigh a few tons. A self propelled gun, that weights rather more simply doesn't need the extra stability.

The recoil felt by the vehicle will vary with:
The efficiency of the recoil system - muzzle brake, hydraulics, etc...
The size of the Gun( IIRC, a basilisk is supposed to be a 122mm, so not more powerful than the 155mm standard for modern SPGs)
The charge it's being fired with.
The firing angle.

Of course, it it really was size it looks like, ie 300-450mm, then yes, it would flip over any time it was fired....
EDIT, Or as X-esiv-4c points out, the recoil system would fail, and the barrel would rip itself from the mounting, or simlar not good stuff.

i would agree with you except i heard that when they first started using the howitzer cannons on the stryker chasis they had the problem with either flipping over or being knocked back several yards. They had to use stabiliizers to stop it.

I think even the M109 has stabilizers if needed.

kendaop
27-04-2009, 19:22
Unfortunately, the triangulating suspension modifiers get in the way of the subatomic particle magnifier, causing the titanium-modified thruster accelerators to reach a state of maximum entropy, thus overheating the magnum tubular syphoning module. As we all know, this can cause disaster when combined with the oxygen-rich atmosphere; the entire vehicle could be subject to bouts of sporradic combustive fusion. You can blame the Bose-Einstein model for this.

Bascially, it would be a bad idea. ;)

x-esiv-4c
27-04-2009, 19:23
Yeah I can confirm that. The 105mm on the Stryker cannot fire at maximum charge, nor at certain angles.
However, if you look at the Basilisk model it does appear to have 2 hydraulic pistols that link the trunions to the base of the platform, perhaps a secondary recoil system. Now, if the Bassie had a soft recoil system it would be all set.

Laser guided fanatic
27-04-2009, 19:27
"Jenkins you did put the handbrake on right?"
"Eugh I think so"
"Fire!"

"Boss, you seem more thin"

Bunnahabhain
27-04-2009, 19:31
Strykers are both taller and lighter than the most tracked chassis used for SPG mounts, aren't they? That's enough to make them far less stable when firing the same weapon, and I'm assuming it uses one of the standard calibres, to make logistics easier.

x-esiv-4c
27-04-2009, 19:33
Most certainly. Thats why they suck in that particular role.

Corpse
27-04-2009, 20:47
Anyone consider the interior of the barrel may have line-guiders for the smaller round, to allow a one--ignite round to lose some of its forward force depending how the mechanics inside the barrel react to the explosion?

Barrel that is wider then the round, with the long adjustible 'lines' guiding the warhead releasing the extra blast-pressure in high oxygen rich enviroment, or aiming high and releasing a certain extent of the pressure (calibrated to the atmosphere/altitude of course) so that the round impacts its destination accurately with an odd angle that its fired at. Unscientific but plausible.