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librisrouge
27-04-2009, 22:45
I find myself wondering if anybody has tried, and had success, with utilizing magnetic paint as a way to easily swap parts of a pieces (i.e. Land Speeder Configurations?)

kane40k
27-04-2009, 22:51
:O no but i like the sound of that. i know my cousins uses magnets on some nids and it appears to work fine, however i didnt know there was paint! i gotta try it!

Jackmojo
27-04-2009, 23:05
I'm betting magnetic paint by itself would not be strong enough, but it might work if the other side has a proper neodymium magent on it.


Jack

Maine
27-04-2009, 23:19
Agreed, sounds like the paint will be more likely to stick to the magnet or itself than to the model...

Something to keep in mind is that magnets will hold the surface together, and while the magnets will try to match direction of poles, they aren't nearly as strong against rotational torque. For this reason you need to use bar magnets rather than round magnets for attaching things like weapons, which will stick out and have a center of gravity that is not centered on the magnet; otherwise the weapons will tend to droop.

I imagine magnetic paint, if it was strong enough, will have the same issue with rotational torque as round magnets, if not moreso.

Raibaru
27-04-2009, 23:30
You sure Maine? In the case of plastic parts, I can't imagine needing to use anything special for the arms and weapons because there is no real weight to any of the pieces.

Especially if you use a magnet on each end as opposed to a magnet and a metal disc for example.

RCgothic
28-04-2009, 11:36
Personally I use disc magnets for everything. If it turns out that I need some extra rotational torque there's usually enough space for a small pin or two.

aberrant_unc
28-04-2009, 12:01
Yeah, adding a small rin prevents any drooping and doesn't require a second magnet... but if you get decent rare earth magnets it takes a very heavy arm to require any of this.

RCgothic
28-04-2009, 13:26
Yeah, adding a small rin prevents any drooping and doesn't require a second magnet... but if you get decent rare earth magnets it takes a very heavy arm to require any of this.

Agreed. :)

izandral
28-04-2009, 14:04
isn't magnetic paint just a form of powder coating that stick to the piece because of a slight magnetic force ? And it needs to be cooked to actually become paint (and lose it's magnetic properties) ???

hereticdave
28-04-2009, 14:14
Not sure what you're thinking of there izandral but the magnetic paint you can pick up in the store is basically a thick emulsion with iron filings in it.

I thought it'd be great for my gaming table and then to back everything in those magnetic sheets you can get [come in rolls] so someone jostling the table wouldn't knock WHQ or Space hulk tiles all over.

Unfortuantely the paint doesn't go on smooth because of the filings and along mildly magnetic it certainly wouldn't work on a wall or with anything with a great weight. Nice texture though but that's about it :) I'll just used thin galvanised steel painted next time.

As for use on models - not a chance in hell sorry. Use the rare earth magnets.

Sholto
28-04-2009, 14:36
There is no way mag-paint has enough pull to work on miniature scale items. Stick to using the rare earth magnets - very cheap on Ebay.

As for using a magnet and a pin (eg a metal arm that won't stay in place with a magnet alone), drill several holes for the pin so that you can get some variation in arm position.

Sholto

izandral
28-04-2009, 15:34
Not sure what you're thinking of there izandral but the magnetic paint you can pick up in the store is basically a thick emulsion with iron filings in it.


ok i learned something today :p

what i was talking about is a process usually used for somewhat large metal object , in my case it's metal medical cabinet. It's powder with a slight magnetic charge that you shoot on the metal item , it stick there and then you cook the whole thing to melt the powder and out comes a painted cabinet.

anyway that was how it was explained to me

electricblooz
28-04-2009, 17:07
ok i learned something today :p

what i was talking about is a process usually used for somewhat large metal object , in my case it's metal medical cabinet. It's powder with a slight magnetic charge that you shoot on the metal item , it stick there and then you cook the whole thing to melt the powder and out comes a painted cabinet.

anyway that was how it was explained to me

that's called "powder coat", although i think the process actually relies on static charge rather than magnetic charge