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Gekiganger
28-09-2009, 23:40
I'm still in the process of painting my SH models and have come to the 'crouching marine ripping floor up' (Alas, It's too late for me to be wanting to ferret out the book to find his name).

His left foot seems to reach the floor... then turn into some elongated mass of plastic with no definition between floor and foot - is this a common problem or am I just unlucky? I did notice a few other marines had poor definition on some areas like the wires hanging around helmets etc.

Not overly impressed with his sculpt atm though, he also has a purity seal flying horizontally from his other leg despite all the others hanging.

Anyone uploaded pictures of how other people coped with his floor-foot would be appreciated if it is a common problem.

beef5570
29-09-2009, 08:35
Mine is the same, I think the 'official' paint job IIRC has the foot fading to black. Thats how I am going to paint mine anyway.
Rob

jullevi
29-09-2009, 10:31
"It's not a problem, it's a feature."

Games Workshop uses steel molds to cast plastic models. Steel mold basically consists of two huge chunks of steel, each of which contains half of the model or bit that ends up in sprue. When the molds are pressed together, plastic is injected creating the sprue. A mold line shows where the two halves of mold are meeting.

Since mold halves are effectively carved in steel, the models must be designed so that there aren't any "undercuts". Sometimes this restriction leads to elongated features or details that are blended together, but the scupltors try to avoid such features as much as possible. Brother Scipios leg, certain skulls on Broodlord base and some other details are simply results of casting restrictions. In recent years Games Workshop designers have been continuosly improving to get around these restrictions . You cannot cheat the steal, but you can think of creative angles to position the miniatures on the sprue or unusual ways of connecting the bits together.

Space Hulk miniatures, especially the terminators, have some really clever design features. It really shows that Dave and Alex have been aided by computer design software to make sure that they are getting the most ouf these molds.

Moronguhl
29-09-2009, 11:11
"It's not a problem, it's a feature."

Games Workshop uses steel molds to cast plastic models. Steel mold basically consists of two huge chunks of steel, each of which contains half of the model or bit that ends up in sprue. When the molds are pressed together, plastic is injected creating the sprue. A mold line shows where the two halves of mold are meeting.

Since mold halves are effectively carved in steel, the models must be designed so that there aren't any "undercuts". Sometimes this restriction leads to elongated features or details that are blended together, but the scupltors try to avoid such features as much as possible. Brother Scipios leg, certain skulls on Broodlord base and some other details are simply results of casting restrictions. In recent years Games Workshop designers have been continuosly improving to get around these restrictions . You cannot cheat the steal, but you can think of creative angles to position the miniatures on the sprue or unusual ways of connecting the bits together.

Space Hulk miniatures, especially the terminators, have some really clever design features. It really shows that Dave and Alex have been aided by computer design software to make sure that they are getting the most ouf these molds.

Got to agree here. When I opened the box I couldn't believe how the models had been laid out on the sprue, and couldn't work out how on earth they were going to work. I cut them out and started to fit them together and it all became clear. Some of the breaks seem nuts but once they're popped together the gaps are invisible.

I'm guessing that wierd angles are the same reasoning for some of the odd arm pegs. Some of mine snapped off but hey, what's plastic glue for?

-Moronguhl

AndrewGPaul
29-09-2009, 11:18
Bear in mind that these are supposed to be boardgame pieces. If they really wanted to go to town on these minis, they could have cut them into even more parts, to avoid undercuts. I assume they deliberately tried to keep them to 3 parts per Marine, and had to make some concessions.