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sic
06-10-2009, 05:54
Anyone else had any problems with the molding of the Space Hulk Minis?

I dragged my feet getting a copy and finally got around to it last week, anyway i started putting the marines together last night and noticed that almost half the terminators have moulding issues with the shoulder crux.

Theres no detail on some sections of the crux, the 'cross' sections on some of the terminators have no detail on the inner, its just the outline if you know what i mean.....Its a pain as ill either have to carve out the recessed sections of the cross or GS em all which will be tricky to keep consistent.

Anyone else or did i just get super unlucky?

jullevi
06-10-2009, 06:46
It has nothing to do with luck. It is a casting compromise that had to be made for models with so few pieces (they had to be cast from certain angle). Even GW cannot cheat the steel molds, but they are doing an exceptional job to get most out of them.

spaint2k
06-10-2009, 07:25
That's why I've cut most of mine off and replaced them with Forgeworld Cruxes.

The two I've left (not including the librarian) have had purity seals strategically added to cover up the awful flatness.

wilsongrahams
06-10-2009, 09:56
It is as stated an issue with a two-piece mold.

I corrected this with a scalpel and some gently cutting to put the horizontal lines in. Took about an hour to finish all of them - I also undercut behind the hanging stuff and where the plastic fills where it shouldn't on the legs.

Start with Scipio if you're not sure you can do it but it really is easy and quite fun to finish sculpting them yourself.

Narius Phinshredder
06-10-2009, 12:40
If there's a real problem with a figure, go down to your local store and tell them. Despite what anyone says they should be able to get their hands on a replacement! This happened with my Harry the Hammer figure, I opened the pack (Finally) after about a month to find the body was badly formed, after a few phone calls I had a new one sent to the store!

Patriarch
06-10-2009, 19:21
If there's a real problem with a figure, go down to your local store and tell them. Despite what anyone says they should be able to get their hands on a replacement! This happened with my Harry the Hammer figure, I opened the pack (Finally) after about a month to find the body was badly formed, after a few phone calls I had a new one sent to the store!
Doesn't really apply here as the SH termies are part of a giant mould - there isn't a discrete model GW can replace without giving you a whole new set of terminators. Also the OP hasn't got a defective model, it's the way all the SH termies are designed.

But for models with defects, GW are always very good about swapping/replacing if you ask.

Temprus
06-10-2009, 22:48
If you look at which ones have the "bad" crux, you might figure out why they did it. It was not random nor a mistake. I wish they had not done it though. :cries:

sic
07-10-2009, 07:04
What? Not a mistake? Please explain....

spaint2k
07-10-2009, 07:21
GW's plastic models are made in two part steel moulds. Steel is completely inflexible which means that the model you are making cannot have ANY "undercut".

What's undercut?

Imagine you are making a steel mould for an object like a cylinder that is round when viewed from above. You can have the mould separation point cutting right through the middle of that circle, resulting in two half-circles in each mould.

Now imagine you are making a two-part mould for an object whose cross-section is a figure of eight. If you cut the 8 in half from left to right, you'll end up with two round shapes in each mould half. You will not be able to extract these pieces from the steel mould because the mould will grip them in place.

The "waist" of the figure of eight is an area that would be called undercut. If you wanted to mould a figure of eight your mould separation line would have to be vertical rather than horizontal.

For a lot of the cruxes on these models, the indentations would be undercut. If they were formed "correctly", the pieces would end up trapped in the mould.

Some of these pieces have been very cleverly made such that the indentations on the cruxes are perpendicular to the axis of the mould line. In such a way, the models can be extracted from the moulds and still maintain a decent level of detail. Unfortunately, many of the models in this set simply are in the wrong pose and the detail on the cruxes is what has suffered most as a result.

Slightly off-topic, but this is why plastic shoulder pads for many marine chapters really aren't that great. The further you go around the shoulder pad the worse the detail gets. Metal or resin (whose moulds are flexible) are the only way to produce this kind of detail satisfactorily.

Steve

Znail
07-10-2009, 15:01
This problem is even more an issue when making models such as these with few parts. If you make arms, legs, torso etc as separate parts then you can chose the mold lines for each individualy. But that makes each model take up more space on the sprue and makes them that much more expensive. So the only way for the space hulk minis to get better would be for them to both be more expensive, have more sprues and a larger box.