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View Full Version : To quit or not to quit? Your experiences, please



feugan
13-02-2010, 19:24
I'm sure some of you have been here: considering quitting wargaming altogether. What are your experiences? Have you stopped painting and playing so that your only participation is on internet fora such as this, or have you quit only to return some time later?

As background, I'm 30 and have collected and played mostly GW games since 1989. I will shortly start work as a hospital doctor having retrained in my late 20s, and will be moving in with my girlfriend of 3 years; we're neither rich nor have a huge home, but there'll be money and space enough for games if I remain in the hobby. I play 40K about 6-8 times a year with one childhood friend, also shacked up with his partner, who lives about 45 minutes drive away. I rarely paint, but have amassed an Eldar army of around 16000 points, and SoB totalling 3000. This is after selling off my other 40K, WHFB, Epic and BFG armies over the last 5 years. There's a GW store and I think at least 1 more general gaming club in Coventry where I live, but I don't access them.

Despite all this, I spend a disproportionate amount of time (maybe up to 6 hours a week) trawling through Warseer, Dakka, BoLs etc. for rumours and modelling projects and clearly maintain an interest in the hobby and fluff.

So, in your experience, should I accept that life moves on, sell up and get out? Should I relegate the models to the loft in case interest flares up in a few years? Should I take a long hard look at myself and stop having existentialist dilemmas over a couple of thousand pounds' worth of plastic and lead? ;)

Tell the board your stories and help a guy out!

Lars Porsenna
13-02-2010, 19:44
IMHO,

If you're just not hearing the muse, pack the figures up and do something else for a while. You clearly have an interest in the hobby aspect, perhaps concentrate on that for a while. Or maybe build model ships or get into historicals.

The last thing I'd recommend is selling off your stuff (if only you had asked before you had begun the great purge). I tried it a while ago with stuff I thought "I'd never want..." until I wanted it. I also see from time to time the post where the person laments "I sold off all my stuff a few years ago, but now I'm getting back into the game..."

Damon.

Mr Potato Head
13-02-2010, 19:56
Well I had a brief hiatus from the hobby, 19 years to be exact! Glad to be back, glad the missus doesn't mind, and now my four year old is taking a real interest very happy to be wargaming. The question is how much do you enjoy those 6-8 games you play with your mate? Enough to want to continue? Only you can know the answer to that. Maybe make those games a bit more memorable, turn them into a slow burning campaign. If you know it'll be played over the course of the year there'll be no pressure and maybe with some sort of narrative it'll keep the games fresh and and make them something to look forward to.
Bottom line, if you enjoy it play it, if not don't bother. Lifes to short to do stuff you don't enjoy.

Condottiere
13-02-2010, 20:12
Take a Sabbatical, it's possible you're going into a phase that requires a great deal more attention, and worrying about whether you should give up a hobby just now may cloud your judgement. Pack them up and in six months time, you can always sell them, if you feel that way.

Etienne de Beaugard
13-02-2010, 20:18
Rather than give advice, let me tell you my own story.

I am in my late thirties and was a roleplayer from middle school through my mid-twenties. After college, I entered war-gaming through GW products, due to a lack of solid RPG groups in my local area. I enjoyed both WHFB and 40k over a period of about eight years. When I turned 30, I changed careers, returned to graduate school, moved to New York City and met the woman who would become my wife. Active wargaming disappeared from my life, though I kept in touch with the hobby through various internet discussion boards.

In my first year of graduate school, I sold off almost all my 40k miniatures, and when I moved in with my wife, I sold off almost all my WHFB miniatures. I expected never to return to active wargaming again. I still frequented a couple internet forums for GW war-gaming.

This past year, I reconnected with one of my old gaming buddies. I acquired a small set of plastic viking miniatures form an historical gaming manufacturer and began painting them. I've played a couple of games LotR SBG and continue to frequent various internet forums.

I'm glad I sold 40k and Fantasy miniatures. While I have fond memories of games past, the enjoyment I received from the games was not keeping pace with the cost in time and money keep up with the various rules changes. My recent re-entry into gaming is small, and I intend to keep it that way.

I never expect to play WHFB or 40k again, nor do I expect to buy any significant amount of GW product again. I will likely continue to acquire and paint 28mm historicals at a slow pace, using them to play the odd skirmish game with friends.

While our situations have many differences, I hope you find my reflections on my personal experiences beneficial to your decision.

kyussinchains
13-02-2010, 21:26
I only play between 10-20 games a year (leaning towards the lower figure) and I'm approaching 30 with a wife, kid and demanding job, yet for me Wargaming is one of the loves of my life, a quick daydream about what to add to my collection can brighten even the dullest day for me.....

I agree with the general consensus here, hang on to your miniatures for a while and see if you are drawn back to them after a year or so.... if you find that absence from the hobby hasn't made your heart any fonder then I would think about selling them off or giving them away to a friend or gaming club.

even if I didn't have anyone to play with I'd still buy the figures and books just to own them, but I appreciate not everyone is like me!

freddythebig
13-02-2010, 21:34
In my case I have pretty much given up on GW. To put it tactfully, they have gone in a direction with their games that I am no longer interested in.

I am still interested in wargaming however and am concentrating more on the historical side of the hobby, an interest that in my case actually pre-dates my interest in GW.

That is not to say that I will never buy anything from GW in the future, who knows where my interests may be in another year or twos time.
For that reason, I would not advise selling stuff off unless you need to for the money. After all you can use the figures for quick skirmish games occasionally with whatever rules you want, GW or otherwise.

I know what you mean about spending more time lurking on forums than actually playing, modelling or painting. I think that happens to us all sometimes.

Cheers.

neXus6
13-02-2010, 21:42
I've just about quit with GW rather than the hobby itself.

About 2 years ago I finally got sick of various issues I had with GW and stopped buying models from them, in addition to this I started looking activly into other games and model companies.

While I've not yet managed to get to the stage where I have a board of my own at home I am slowly building up collections of non-GW models. The only real problem I have is that there isn't a single wargaming club in my town only a GW store, I have many friends who still play GW games, and occationally I go in with them and play the odd game but really nothing like I used to over the previous 13-14 years.

I love the background of Fantasy and 40k but the games, the prices, and the attitude of the company have been the real killer.

I don't think I would ever get rid of all my models, I'd always keep some of my favourite armies in cases stashed away somewhere...even if I never played a GW game again there are numerous rules systems out there with which I could use the models for various things.

There's certainly nothing wrong with keeping an eye on the hobby even if you currently aren't active in it (infact wouldn't keeping an eye on it count as being active?).

I'm probably not the best to comment on what should be done with the models as I am some what of a paranoid horder, I hate throwing things away incase for some unlikely reason I'd turn out to need it in the future.
:p

Mini77
13-02-2010, 21:51
I quit 13 years ago, in similar to circumstances to yourself. I had recently met my soon to be wife, bought our first home and setting up a business. I sold off everything I had for next to nothing. I still regret selling everything now. Many of the models held stories of their own.

I've now to gone back to 40k, relearning the rules, painting minis and meeting new people. It's fresh, it's enjoyable - it's great.

So basically, what I'm saying is take a break. Pack your things away and forget about them, because one day in all likelihood you'll go back to them and your interest will be rekindled.

I will say as well, that as a newcomer here it seems fairly evident to me that some of the discontent voiced around these boards (pricing stance, rule issues, codex writing etc) stems from this same jaded, bored mindset.

It's the same with everything - keep it fresh by interspersing it with something else.

Jellicoe
13-02-2010, 22:22
What the others have said. I got into Warhammer circa 84 having been a WWII man prior to that. I played as did many throughout my school days and continued with local friends in Uni holidays. However when I moved out into a tiny flat and became an NHS wage slave I left behind GW for the best part of a decade. All I could manage in my flat were map and counter games played by post and my local club was principally an ancients place. It wasn't until 10 years later that I got back into 40k courtesy of a mates WD when I saw Jex Goodwin's 3rd ed Tyranids. Whilst I now have wife and child I continue to enjoy the odd game and certainly enjoy the painting and modelling. Having the space and a disposable income certainly helps too!

so put the figs away for a rainy day. Get yourself through training and fish them out again when you are an ST4+ with a decent rota that is conducive to you having hobbies again. Think of all the forgeworld geat you can get with a nice fat consultant salary!

Dais
14-02-2010, 00:01
after my lgs shut down my 40k gaming basically shut down along with it. i had a table at home but nobody ever had time for a full game.
even after 4ed came out and my two codexes came out back to back i couldnt even get an army updated and played maybe 5 partial games before i realized i needed a shorter game on the side.
in the end the looks of models and deep rules brought me to warmachine. at first i decided it was just a side game and i wasnt quitting 40k but about 6 months later i realized i already had quit 2 years earlier and just couldnt let go.
right now im still slowly selling and trading my 40k stuff off (it is hard to get rid of oop tyranids) and thoroughly enjoying my new game and actually getting to play it.

i would suggest branching out to a quicker game than what gw offers. maybe a historical or skirmish game. there are so many other games out there you are bound to find something that suits you.

Lewis
14-02-2010, 00:14
I sold off all of my White Wolf roleplaying games that I had collected over eight years and came to really regret it. Although I don't have the six feet of shelf sapce they required.

I sold off all of my 1980's/90's GW stuff that I knew would never make an army and felt fine about it.

I'm in a similar situation to you lifestyle and age wise although my model buying has rocketed recently and I'm having similar thoughts.

One possible third way that I'm considering is shifting to Warmachine (which would require less models) specialist games and boardgames. This would talk up less space, less prep time, realisitically less money and would be easier to pick up and put down with friends on an informal basis.

In addition I am less and less happy with GW as a company and part of my attraction to the idea of selling off all my 40K and warhamer is that it would free me from involvement with their business as much as possible apart from the pieces for the odd Bloodbowl team.

I don't know if I will do this at all though.

stonedrose
14-02-2010, 00:29
I started work as an F1 Doctor this year, I keep up with my hobby, have a girlfriend, etc.

I'd keep it up if I were you, work-life balance being my main point, I guess it depends how much you enjoy it. I game one a week at my local gaming club, paint far more than the average punter (but I think I'm a decent painter and it chills me out after work) but don't use the internet so much.

It sounds like the hobby is not doing a lot for you, but if you want an idea of how it fits around my life (I have no idea what stage of training you're at), then PM me.

duffybear1988
14-02-2010, 03:28
When I was younger my friends and I loved warhammer but when my friends reached maybe 16 or 17 they all gave it up and I was the only one who continued on. I tried to give up warhammer when I left for university as I figured it would interupt my studies. I packed all my stuff up and left it at home. At freshers week I noticed the wargames club and joined up just in case I had trouble making friends elsewhere as I knew I would have some common interests with the guys at the club. A couple of weeks later I found myself sick and tired of all the late night partying and the cash wasted on booze and clubs (to be fair I have never really been a big party fan), I went to the club and met a bunch of people who had the same views as me and these people soon became my main friendship group outside of my course and flat mates. Anyway I went home at christmas and brought my 40k back to uni for some games and got more involved. I do find I get distracted by warhammer sometimes but without it I would have probably gone insane in my first year at uni as there really is very little else to do for a break here.

Now when I go home there is nobody to play games with as my local county lacks any real clubs or GW stores or anything so I practically give up gaming for the best part of 6 months of the year... when I get back to uni I always have a blast and I always feel refreshed. I guess its good to have a break sometimes, but I will always be a wargamer deep down so it will be hard to ever give it up completely.

Now I am the president of the wargames club at uni and get others involved in it... I dont know what the hell im going to do when I graduate in the summer as I will have to return home to my warhammer-less world where there arent any clubs.

sssk
14-02-2010, 08:08
I seem to be at a similar stage to yourself. I've spent a healthy (or possibly not so healthy) 11 years playing GW games. I started as a young teenager with 40K. Started to lose interest at around 16, and moved into the world of fantasy (selling all my 40k stuff), since then I've collected many different fantasy armies, but now I need to get rid of mostly for money and space, but also because I get to play so few games these days.

However I still play the occasional game in holidays etc, so I'm in the process of selling off all my armies bar 2000 points of goblins, and 1000 points of Wood elves. I'm also keeping my necromunda gang.

Hopefully at some point in the future I'll be able to get back into gaming, and then I'll be incredibly grateful that I don't have to start completely from scratch (especially with painting all those goblins).

I'd suggest maybe keeping the core (2000 or so points) of your army (or the models you like best/have painted best) and selling the rest. That way they can be stashed away quietly in a corner, until you get a chance/inclination to go back to playing some games.

Chucklemoney
14-02-2010, 09:11
I feel my involvement in GW games and wargaming generally comes and goes in phases. Have recently been getting interested in Skirmish games and had thought that my interest in GW was just about finished - for the second time, had exited the hobby years ago only to be brought back by a friend.

Unfortunately for me the varied background of the Warhammer and 40k world allow them to be the perfect backdrop for any fantasy/sci-fi project that pops into your head.

I have only very recently seen district 9 and now I want to do a homebrew codex with converted 'prawn's' etc, 40k is the perfect platform for that and so just when I thought I was out they pull me back in.

Hold onto your models, pop them in boxes in the back room, if you have no interest in them after a few years then sell them off at that time, they will likely fund a holiday from all the doctoring.

Kaptajn_Congoboy
14-02-2010, 10:53
I started wargaming with Rogue Trader 40k when I was in my earliest teens back in the late 80s - 1988 or 1989, depending on viewpoint. Me and my friends got into 40k, WHFB, Epic, Space Fleet (BFGs predecessor), Blood Bowl, Man o'War, Necromunda...the whole GW shebang. When I went to get my first university degree, I was already souring on the direction GW was heading (Blood Bowl excepted), and tried out alternate miniatures games: Dirtside, Full Thrust, Raven, DBM...eventually my wargaming interest died out altogether; none of the lines really captured my interest. I kept up my 40k/Fantasy fluff reading (primarily through borrowing) and kept an eye open for new systems, but I was not an active player. Instead, I boardgamed and pursued other hobbies, and played GW-based Computer Games when they came out and were good. I could have gone historical, but the more I read about ancient and medieval military history the more I found the systems out there unimpressive - FOG is just the latest of many historicals I can't get excited about: boardgames, with narrow period - spesific (even action-spesific) are my choice for historical gaming: I do not believe you can do a competitive, engaging historical game series without compromising on the historical realism.

I had a ten-year hiatus from active wargaming, until three years back, when I tried out Warmachine from Privateer Press and rediscovered the urge - a combination of the rules and the thorough background work kept me in and interested - indeed, it has terminated my boardgaming, more or less. As the WM players were also playing GW games, I bought a WHFB Empire army and a 40k Tyranid army, but I have since discovered that I really can't get back into GW with much enthusiasm (the Tyranid army got swapped for more Protectorate of Menoth). That is hardly unique for me: my White Wolf collection also languishes in boxes, unplayed for half a decade.

My personal experience and preference says: sell your figures if you intend to have a gaming break. You'll want to start entirely afresh when you begin again, not with your old things. I did not, and my Bad Moon Orks, Bretonnians knights, Chaos Epic and Bretonnian fleets are gathering dust, packed down and being a bother when me and the wife move (although I am sure I could get decent price for it these days - Space Ork Raiders boxes are getting rare :) - not to mention Corsairs and Lords of Battle). But also - keep up the modeling aspect. I've painted a few figures over the years, even If I had no plans playing with them, and it was always great fun.

crandall87
14-02-2010, 11:58
When I decided to quit I had so many spare parts left over and wasn't in a great financial state so ironically that's how Bitzbox was born and that sucked me right back in however I mainly model and paint these days as most of my old gaming buddys have since quit.

rich1231
14-02-2010, 12:35
Its a hobby, and you either enjoy it or you dont..

You will if you sell up regret the sale at some point in the future though and many will end up starting again spending even more when that happens. Pack them up, place in storage and have a break.

You never know when enthusiasm jumps in again. also before you do it go to some mainstream wargames shows, Salute etc and see how diverse the wider hobby is. It might spark your interest.

Toyama
14-02-2010, 13:08
I started gaming with collectible card games: MAGIC, MEtW, Battletech CCG, Netrunner, etc. When visiting gaming conventions, I saw these elder guys playing dead-seriously with painted miniatures and I pitied them.
Through the CCG, I gained interest in the battletech universe and started collecting, painting and playing Bttletech minis. From Battletech came Warhammer, 40K, Necromunda, Mordheim, BFG, etc. Now I'm a few weeks from my 50th birthday and I'm definitely one of them - a balding elder mini-playing guy. Married, children and working as a medical doctor, every now or then, I still find time and pleasure in the minis hobby. At several occasions I felt like giving up gaming. Luckily, I never sold my minis. With new releases of rulebooks and codexes, I happen to regain interest in my armies and games.

Nevertheless, I expect never to return to Warhammer FB. The models I collected 15 years ago are now so outdated, I will never field them again (O&G, Bretonnia). The same probably applies to my Necron collection (the older metal models do not mix well with the new plastics). But selling them off? I don't know...

In the mean time, my son started playing 40K. He has a decent sized Necron army and is getting harder to defeat each game (actually, I lost three times in a row). Such is life.
When his friends from school come to visit, they admire my collection and even try their own games, playing with my models and scenery. I'm happy I never discarded any of my armies.

feugan
14-02-2010, 13:36
Thanks to all of you for sharing your experiences. Its encouraging that you almost all identify waxing and waning enthusiasm for the hobby.

@Lewis: I'd like to see a thread if you do switch to Warmachine. Won't another mythology take time to learn and get immersed in? What about the time invested in 40K?

@Kaptajn_Congoboy: interesting that you differ from the consensus and suggest selling up. Have you never had occasion to bust out the older models? This was my feeling with the armies I've already sold - rationalise down to 2 with the most appealing imagery and stop accumulating more things to paint.

@rich1231: I started out at conventions held on the South Coast playing Epic and Vietnam historicals. It'd be good to see what's out there.

@Jellicoe, stonedrose, Toyama: I'm moderately surprised to see so many NHS/medical people here. I'm a year behind you stonedrose, starting F1 in August exams permitting. I'm sure the reality of rotas and ward work will be quite different to how I imagine it even after a clinically-oriented course. Work-life balance is a tricky beast.

Kaptajn_Congoboy
14-02-2010, 13:49
@Kaptajn_Congoboy: interesting that you differ from the consensus and suggest selling up. Have you never had occasion to bust out the older models? This was my feeling with the armies I've already sold - rationalise down to 2 with the most appealing imagery and stop accumulating more things to paint.

I've had a single Man o'War game with my Bretonnians - last years, after Warmachine brought me back to wargaming - and it was great fun, but I do not have the time nor inclination to actively search out opponents, which is necessary for MoW today. I sort of outgrew both my fascination for Orks and Chaos, and while I still have a soft spot for my old WHFB Bret models (I like the high medieval visual style), the new Bretonnian playstyle and fluff are not to my liking (the WHFB attempt was with Empire). So no, not really.

The problem with your question is that answers will always be very individual - my old models are just space in the basement, whereas Toyomas' old models get a new life with his son. When I got back in, I started with a clean slate - models and system-wise. It worked well for me.

Dwarf Supreme
14-02-2010, 15:29
As others have said take a sabbatical. Wargaming will always be there if/when you decide to return. I think most guys go through pretty much the same thing. You meet a girl, you become involved with your career, get married, buy a house, have children, etc. However, I wouldn't sell anything just yet. You never know when the desire will return and you might regret selling your minis, especially OOP ones that might be hard to re-acquire.

Earl_UK
14-02-2010, 15:50
Take up Dawn of War 1 or 2.

After you get past the none Codex nature of it all, there good mindless fun in a universe you know.

Works for me.

I do the odd miniature everynow and then.

GomezAddams
14-02-2010, 17:50
Okay, my experience is a little spotty. About 18 months ago, after being in the hobby for around 17 years, I grew very fed up of it all. Whilst I am a bit of a model magpie when it comes to buying things, I dont rush out and buy the newest army each time one comes out, nor do I buy or have I ever bought large amounts at once. Lots of bits of everything here and there which mounted and mounted. I slowly began selling things up, holding onto my paints and things that I particularly liked. I even binned a hell of a lot of stuff that just wasnt sellable for one reason or another. My room got neater, and I was coming to terms with leaving the hobby.

It was 13 months ago that I met my better half (known on here as Morticia). And something rather odd happened.

Because we were spending so much time together, I never really had a break and so when I did end up with some time to spare I didnt jump online or on the xbox but picked up my brushes. I ranted for a good few months about the shiny lizard I wanted to paint because it looked cool, and the Aliens-esque game she was going to play - both of which we did.

Bringing it forward to now, I have a fairly large guard army with lots and odds and ends from lots of different manufacturers. I check tabletop wargaming news daily to see whats new, and I've never painted so much in my life. I've had maybe five games since I met the missus, but thats more then I've played in the last 6 years.

What brought me back was the painting aspect. Theres nothing that beats painting a beautiful sculpt for me, and I'm thrilled I cleared all the backlog. I think part of the problem you have is that you've got so much unpainted and you end up in a vicious cycle of 'I could paint one, but theres still 200+ to paint, so I'll leave it'.

As others have said, take a break, but I'd also sell anything which isnt painted. Selling up that much kit would probably pay for something nice at your new place, and means when you do come back you can start anywhere - whether that be with other companies miniatures or whatever.

Best of luck

badgeraddict
14-02-2010, 19:49
You cannot quit GW easily, that would be like asking me to give up caffeine and Shortbread.

Jellicoe
14-02-2010, 22:19
Work life balance is indeed a tricky business and the NHS is a demanding mistress and particularly so for my medical colleagues! (not a medic myself but a director)

As such I have found that even though i don't get as much gaming in as I would like the modelling and painting are a fantastic means of stress relief and really allow me to switch off. Now I am back into things I have over the last few years been stripping down my badly painted stuff from the 1980's and repainting them - a new lease of life for old figs and in the case of my marines an apoc army for virtually no extra outlay - such is the value today of a couple of boxes of 30 marines for a tenner each all those years ago

Lewis
14-02-2010, 22:28
@Lewis: I'd like to see a thread if you do switch to Warmachine. Won't another mythology take time to learn and get immersed in? What about the time invested in 40K?
.

It'd be a big step. The mythology would be the least of my worries to be honest. As I understand it the Iron Kingdoms background is fairly straightforward and lacks the 30 year history of warhammer and 40K. The thing I think I would find hard with the shift would be the lack of individuality in armies: all the warcasters are these named characters and it gives one far less independence of imagination compared to Warhammer/ 40K (aaaand Privateer flame on!). On most other fronts I think the game sounds better: more technical depth, better support for the community, less money spent on less models, less need for storage. The models are less to my taste than GW's and they look like they are far less geared to conversions which is one of the main things I enjoy but still.....

Next week I'm going to start gaming at a new gaming store that features both systems, I may try WM out properly and see how I go.

What are other people's experiences of shifting system?

Of course the other option is historical: even more models but I could use it the models to teach Y7 and 8 history.

Kaptajn_Congoboy
14-02-2010, 23:19
For the fluff, the Iron Kingdoms (IK) are actually pretty well fleshed out. The setting began life as a roleplaying game and birthed a series of books - two massive basic background ones (the World and Character guide) in addition to smaller setting books and sourcebooks. The different factions get their say on things in the Warmachine and Hordes books, which means you are never exactly sure what is the real truth on some matters. The detail is greater than I was used to.

In addition to that, there is an evolving narrative running along in the books. The basic premises are set down and they don't change writers much - Doug Seacat has been the head writer for some years, so the stories are concise even as they are shrouded in the viewpoints of the different factions. With Mk2, they just launched a new story arc. This means you won't see factions geting retconned out of existence - but the downside is, if you don't like the story, it likely won't be changing drastically :D

As for individuality, I think it is the exact opposite: WM/H is all about individuality. For starters, the factions carry very strong themes and playstyles themselves. Additionally, every warcaster and warlock, and a goodly number of the solos, warjacks and even a few units, are "character models" that partake in the overall story and have very distinctive, highly individual personalities, style and playstyle within their faction's limits and abilities. The recent addition of themed lists that can be used (with restrictions on army composition) with the different warcasters, the game got even more individualized.

What WM/H is not, however, is customizeable. You don't tool your warcasters, solos, units and warjacks up with their own wargear and abilities: they are all "born" with them and you play with them "as is".

In short, where 40k/WHFB has "generic" armies that you then can customize, WM/H has "individual" armies you choose from, within a set system. The growth of the game has given a great deal of options, though - you can build very different kinds of lists from a single faction. Opinions differ as to whether this means factions are bleeding into each other or not. As i stands now, I don't think so. A shooty Khador list will be a very different beast from a shooty Cygnar list.

iamfanboy
15-02-2010, 07:21
I say filter it down to the necessities.

A few years ago, I was teaching people to play 40k, hosting small 40k tournaments on the base I was stationed on, and letting lots of different people play with my armies because watching them play was as much fun as playing myself, so it was important to me to have lots of different armies. I had at least 3,000 points each of Space Marines, Chaos, Orks, Eldar, Imperial Guard, and Tyranid fully painted and ready to go.

Nowadays? I will NOT teach anyone else to play 40k until the company refocuses itself and realizes where its priorities should be. I would only need more than one army to teach another player how to play; all I need is one if I'm going to hop down to a corner store and join a tournament.

So, I sold off all my armies but my favorite: Eldar.

I still have half a dozen Bloodbowl teams, three Necromunda gangs, and two BFG fleets, but those are games that I could actually see myself teaching someone to play and love. These days I'm more focused on Battletech, to be honest; it was my first real wargame and finding the game alive and well after FASA's demise only made me love it more.

sic
15-02-2010, 07:44
I come and go with the hobby. I have a lot on my plate (wife, self employed, 2 kids, other hobbies) and so its not something im fanatical about.

I think i probably played 2 games last year but the new Nids is getting me inspired again and I find thats how it happens. Like yourself I still find myself on the forums even when my interest in gaming and painting wanes but again not fanatically (check my post count versus my join date...) but i would never sell the armies I have.

If you have the space put them in a cupboard and leave them alone for as long as you like, chances are if you have a break and then get back into it you will want shiny new toys but having an army ready to go is certainly handy.

Lewis
15-02-2010, 08:43
For the fluff, the Iron Kingdoms (IK) are actually pretty well fleshed out....

As for individuality, I think it is the exact opposite: WM/H is all about individuality. For starters, the factions carry very strong themes and playstyles themselves. Additionally, every warcaster and warlock, and a goodly number of the solos, warjacks and even a few units, are "character models" that partake in the overall story and have very distinctive, highly individual personalities, style and playstyle within their faction's limits and abilities. The recent addition of themed lists that can be used (with restrictions on army composition) with the different warcasters, the game got even more individualized.



Thanks for that summary, it was very informative.

I think we perceive individuality as a different thing. I see individuality as allowing me to invent backgrounds for my army, to create an IG army where my standard troops have the heads of Brettonian archers because the are a scummy dirty people and where the chracter models are my invention. Although War Machine offers you a range of highly individual play styles, and I can well pelieve that PP have developed armies that have their faction play styles differentiated from each other, you aren't making up the fluff/background or the appearance of the army for yourself as you do with Warhammer.

This is a highly noob question, but how much model conversion and individuality of paint schemes is there in Warmachine?

Toyama
15-02-2010, 09:41
I say filter it down to the necessities.

These days I'm more focused on Battletech, to be honest; it was my first real wargame and finding the game alive and well after FASA's demise only made me love it more.

I SO agree. Battletech is very much alive - again. Great universe.

howlinmonkey
15-02-2010, 09:42
Hi,
I'm nearly 45!, I been in and around the hobby since about White Dwarf 53 and seen the rise of the GW empire,from a very friendly mail order service where you ended up on first name terms with the person who despatched your order!Changed days now...I go through periods feeling bored and like others have mentioned, take a step back and concentrate on something else for a while.But; I keep coming back. Try collecting minis from other companies as one off projects. Clubs are different and I think that this is where the problem lies. You tend to end up playing the same missions week in week out with the same scenery albeit placed randomly, but familiarity sets in and guess what that breeds... 40k has a rich background that needs to be integrated more onto the tabletop, the problem is how to do it? Perhaps GW need to (via WD) publish frequent state of the galaxy updates which outline what is currently happening. By this I mean every quarter, so that veteran players have regular info that they can input into their games and thereby drive their games forward;its called impetus. Everybody gets bored turning up at a club night with say 1000-1500pts and playing standard missions?Where's the excitement in that?

Toyama
15-02-2010, 09:46
I think i probably played 2 games last year but the new Nids is getting me inspired again and I find thats how it happens.

I couldn't agree more. That's exactly how it goes.
I've got a nice SoB army waiting for the new witchhunters/inquisition/Ordo/whatever codex...
Ánd I can wait for another 2, maybe 3, years....

(waiting)

bosstroll
15-02-2010, 12:23
I've run into it aswell, GW makes me feel unwanted with their direection in the last few years, i havent bought much beyond a few shiny's. So i went online, and found Heavy Gear, played the computer games a few years back, and i liked the background and the models a lot. So i got myself a small north and a small south army. Reinvigorated my interest in wargaming to no end, i'm actually painiting again now. :)

(if your interested in Heavy Gear: www.dp9.com)

I, however, won't be selling my GW minies, love them too much for that.

DCLXVI
15-02-2010, 13:27
Hi there, here's my short story...
I'm in my mid 40's now, and back in the late 90's when my kids were still young I had to sell all my Eldar, Dark Eldar and Dark Angels, mostly to pay a few bills and because I just hadn't got the cash or time to keep it up.
I did keep all my Harlequins though as I liked the models, and just a few years later I found I started to get some spare money, so I did an unofficial Harly list and slowly but surely my hobby started to grow again.

Now I've split up with my 40k hating wife and moved in with someone who understands my point of view as she used to play Fantasy herself and I've amassed a decent sized Eldar force and am currently starting a huge modular terrain project.

So then...my advice is - you seem similar to me in that you like to keep up with the hobby, and even if you sell all your minis you'd still do that, so if you've got the space, store them for a while and you might find that things roll round and you get time to play again.
From my own experience it's a shame when you look back at what you had and wish you never got rid of it.

fracas
15-02-2010, 14:04
as a doctor, you will slowly but surely increase the stress level of your life. sometimes the wife/gf will be an antidote to this stress. sometimes the wife/gf will increase your stress. if you find the game (modeling as well as painting and gaming) a nice stress relief, i would keep in the hobby. it would be better if you can game once a month .... something more regular rather than sporadic

yabbadabba
15-02-2010, 14:40
If you don't need the money or the space, do not get rid of anything. You will regret it later. I have spent almost a decade deciding what to keep and what to sell, and have only just started getting rid of stuff. I am glad I didn't go with my first thoughts.

snurl
16-02-2010, 06:38
If you don't need the money or the space, do not get rid of anything. You will regret it later. I have spent almost a decade deciding what to keep and what to sell, and have only just started getting rid of stuff. I am glad I didn't go with my first thoughts.

Seconded. I know several people who sold off their stuff and then regretted it a few years later.

Kaptajn_Congoboy
16-02-2010, 07:48
Gaming is, indeed, stress relief.



This is a highly noob question, but how much model conversion and individuality of paint schemes is there in Warmachine?

...as much as you make it? Privateer has a lowest-common-denomitor model tournament rules set that requires conversions to be based on the original model for ease of identification. I have never actually attended any tournament that aspired to those levels of anality, though, and when I was squemish about applying as a Press Ganger (Outrider parallel...not that I actually haven't, due to RL pressures, had time to do it yet) because of those rules and how I perceived them to be a hindrance if you wanted to be "official", other Press Gangers set me straight: it is all up to the tournament organizers. One of my best gaming buddies has some excellent Risen (zombies/skeletons hastily raised) made from kitbashes of GW models, regular Risen, PP Revenant pirates and other gaming manufacturer's models). Nobody has ever doubted what they are, which means his 20 Risen are all thematic "individuals" raised from different IK races and factions.

Considering that the most recent No Quarter (their bimonthly magazine) had an army where the druidic Circle Orboros had been thematically reinvented as some sort of demon worshippers, with red http://privateerpress.com/files/imagecache/1up/products/circle-orboros/warbeasts/gnarlhorn-satyr.png Satyrs (link above for pic of the original Satyr scheme) and a Pyramid Head warlock (not to my taste; it went entirely beyond the fluff) I think they give plenty of leeway - this was an army featured in the magazine, built in their "Staff Challenge" article series, where their employees get to spin the wheel of factions and start a new army. You are quite free to invent your own color schemes and conversions - it would be silly not to let people paint how they'd like. I tend to stick to reposings and minor conversion myself, but my Skorne, for example, are purple-and-silver rather than studio red-and-bronze.

lanrak
21-02-2010, 15:35
Hi all.
I NEVER QUIT MY HOBBY.
But my hobby changes from time to time.:D

I never associate one companies product as being 'my entire hobby'.

I have played wargames for over 25years, and the games I play sometimes use minatures.:D
As I spend quite a bit of time crafting these minatures into 'my armies', I tend to use them in other games , rather than get rid of them.

Having the ability to chose from nearly 50 different games,at our wargames club, not to mention the relaxed atitude towards proxying .(We actualy think the games are MORE important than the markers/counters used.:eek:)

I may quit playing a particular game , or buying a particulr companies products.
But with such a wide variety of games available 'my hobby' will be an everchanging challenging fun experiance.:D

TTFN
Lanrak.

Misfratz
23-02-2010, 04:35
My experience then:

I played a lot as a kid, and kept up my contact with the hobby while at University, playing with friends in the holidays, and still modelling and painting.

Then, rather suddenly, I had a child. This, naturally, put the kibosh on things for a bit, but gradually I was able to find some time to do some painting, and I went to a few Vet's nights and things for a while. I even dug up a few very old marines for my daughter to splash some paint on, and we had fun painting a few snap together gaunts.

Then her mother sodded off to the other end of the country, and I suddenly had no free time once again.

Now, I did think that, after a while, I would be able to cultivate free time once more. To a certain extent I have, but, unexpectedly, I have become a knitter, and I generally spend my spare time these days knitting, reading or baking. It's been a long time since I touched my models. It's been a long time since I've visited Warseer, but then I can't sleep tonight, so...

I'm not selling my models though. I doubt I'd get a huge amount of money for them and I'm not yet in such dire financial straights. I reckon there's a fair chance that I'd want to return to them again, perhaps in a few years time. Who knows? I might be playing a Viola by then...

feugan
23-02-2010, 14:22
Thanks to everybody who's given advice, anecdotes, suggestions and experience. I think a few of my models will be heading to eBay, but the majority will take up residence in the loft until interest resurfaces and free time manifests itself.

Cheers,
feugan

Llew
24-02-2010, 15:13
I think you've made a wise decision. There's absolutely nothing wrong with keeping a hobby you love, or taking some time off from a hobby. (Having sold off whole armies and game systems before for cheap when I thought I was done with it, I can assure you you're better off keeping the parts you like.)

Demrush
24-02-2010, 15:45
Thanks to everybody who's given advice, anecdotes, suggestions and experience. I think a few of my models will be heading to eBay, but the majority will take up residence in the loft until interest resurfaces and free time manifests itself.

Cheers,
feugan

You mentioned you were going to work as a hospital doctor...Now I don't know the ins and outs of working as a doctor but I know for a fact that it's A LOT of time commitment, especially if you are still in residency.

Others have said it and you've probably made up your mind but I'll give my opinion anyway: first things first, get focused on your work and life - moving with your gf is a big deal too. Then, when everything settles down and you've let your passion for the hobby simmer to a nice boil, you can take the lid off the kettle and pour yourself some delicious tea "à la" warhammer!

You're clearly passionate about the hobby and although you might think its time to move on, I think you should stick to it, even if it's an on and off thing. Simply enjoy the hobby for what it is, just a fun pass time...Take this from a guy who's had the same existential dilemma! :)

Cheers!

Nunnja
24-02-2010, 20:05
Not sure if my contribution will help at all, being similar to many other posters', but here goes...

I got into 40K around 18 years ago after buying a box set of Genestealers because I liked the look of them :p Moved on from there into Necromunda, and ran a few Vampire: The Masquerade and D& D games, before giving it all up because it was 'nerdy'.

About 3 years ago, during a stressful time of my life, I got back into the hobby with the Skull Pass box set, and I can honestly say it did me the world of good. It got me away from the mundane cycle of working and then socialising with people from work, gave me something to do in my spare time that was akin to meditation in the sense of peace it brought me, and has also given my parnter and I a hobby we can share and enjoy together.

As other posters said, if you don't enjoy it, don't do it, but don't abandon it entirely. If you do, and the day comes when you yearn for it again, you'll regret getting rid of everything.

And life's too short for regrets :)

frozenwastes
24-02-2010, 20:46
My worst regret was when I stopped gaming and doing other hobby stuff because of career/financial reasons. The things that we love give us relaxation and motivation. By cutting them out of my life for a period to concentrate on what I thought were priorities made me miserable. Don't live for "someday" when you can return to doing what you love, it might not come.

tu33y
25-02-2010, 09:41
i love the creative part of the hobby and i do very much enjoy the tactical hole-stomping of battle. i love sticking models together and creating dynamic looking characters from essentially small bits- i love the way everything fits together. i dont really enjoy painting so much but when a model is finished and looks awesome it makes me very happy!

like a previous poster i was at a bit of an unstable moment and the hobby made a really big difference so i sort of owe it everything

but i am seriously getting priced out of the hobby right now and i have a very reasonable disposable income. its not the cost, it is just percieved value for money. little things like charging more but including less bits. "dumbing down" models (cadian HQ sprue in particular- but the catachan is brilliant) and to be honest using fewer sprues. I KNOW its cheaper and cleverer but when i used to buy old chimeras and Leman russes and you got about 6 different sprues or more. it felt nicer than just two sprues with no bits left over. Its like when they dropped the ruins from the cadian battle box. just WHY? unless the mould had actually broken or ran out wouldnt it cost more to change the packing line and box artwork than just leaving it in?

so im a fat man on the edge right now... i think im just going to buy a vulture and basically draw a line under new models till i get desparate to make stuff!

Wintersdark
25-02-2010, 11:09
My story:

I'm 34 now; and I've been gaming on and off since I was 13. I typically get well into the hobby for a few years, then pack everything up and go do other things for a few years without a thought back. In a few of my breaks - most notably shortly after the Ogre Kingdoms release - I've sold all my armies. That one saw some 10k of Goblins and 20k of Dark Elves sold.

I certainly don't mind my breaks - I tend to get RIGHT out of the hobby during them though; I stop browsing forums, going to the various gaming shops, everything, and just pursue other hobbies entirely. Over the last six years, I've been very hard pressed to find the time required to get back into tabletop gaming (it does require a lot of time when all is said and done) as I worked very, very long and irregular hours. I was recently laid off, though, and am using my new-found free time to get back into the hobby.

The only regret I have is selling my models. I don't mind starting a new army; there's so many new models, new lists etc that I've got lots of options, and I'm really looking forward to it. However, had I kept all my old models, it would have been far easier to slip back into the hobby and play a few games right now, rather than slowly start from scratch again (Oh, how I miss my bits box!!!)

This isn't my only break, of course, I've taken several over the decades I've been wargaming, and I've always found taking a year (or a couple years now, how time flies so much faster as you get older) makes the game a lot more enjoyable when I come back to it. I find I start to get burnt out, but often am not really aware of it at the time. Much like how that can happen when you're playing MMO's online =)

So, my advice is much as you've said you're thinking of doing.

Pack up your favourite models, sell/trade/give away others - just keep your favourites, enough to get back into things whenever you want to. And move on with your life.

You'll come back later, and it'll be all the better when you do.

Jagged
25-02-2010, 13:27
When you get bored with your hobby pack it up carefully and put it away.

Then years later when your son finds it you can start again with renewed enthusiasm.

Admittedly that is a bit of a long term strategy :D

ltsobel
26-02-2010, 17:53
I had a break for around 8 years. Started reading the Black Library stuff a couple of years ago as i worked near Forbidden Planet in London and they sold them. I dont regret the break but im glad im back.

Have now started going to a weekly club and am buying new armies again.

One thing I have found after having a break is buying from scratch is a double edged sword, the cost and hassle can be high, especially as im earninng more so getting carried away is no longer a weeks pocket money and also has to be explained to the wife! But you get the whole joy of a shiny new army.

I have also developed an interest in historical gaming somehow so my Dark Elves have been joined by some Romans and US Paras.

Also I have a lot less time to paint due to bundle of joy.

Mini77
26-02-2010, 17:59
I had a break for around 8 years. Started reading the Black Library stuff a couple of years ago as i worked near Forbidden Planet in London and they sold them. I dont regret the break but im glad im back.

Have now started going to a weekly club and am buying new armies again.

One thing I have found after having a break is buying from scratch is a double edged sword, the cost and hassle can be high, especially as im earninng more so getting carried away is no longer a weeks pocket money and also has to be explained to the wife! But you get the whole joy of a shiny new army.

I have also developed an interest in historical gaming somehow so my Dark Elves have been joined by some Romans and US Paras.

Also I have a lot less time to paint due to bundle of joy.

As a general rule if it cost £50, tell her it was £25. :angel:

Lars Porsenna
26-02-2010, 19:23
As a general rule if it cost £50, tell her it was £25. :angel:

We maintain separate bank accounts, and a 3rd for household/family bills. That way I can spends my money and tell her anything I want...after all, as long as the bills are getting paid, and we tuck a little extra away for "rainy days" who cares (especially since she has her own interests)?

Damon.