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Lewis
20-02-2010, 19:57
I'm cleaning out the cupboard where I store my White Dwarfs and this has necessitated stacking them in piles in the living room. The arrangement of the plies means that the magazine at the top of each pile provides me with a different sample from GW's history. I thught I'd flick through them and make a few observations.

WD 107. November 1988. The first of the current size of White Dwarf, there is an editorial explaining the reasons for this, more explanation of the GW's decisions than one gets nowadays at any rate. Reading through the "coming soon" section what really strikes one is the extent to which the company at the time were willing to tell you about ideas that might never see the light of day or which never saw the light of day for several years after the heads up.
Examples include "Empires" which would become Mighty Empires and which eventually saw release about two years later, An actualy advert for the "coming soon" "The Lost and the Damned" Realm of Chaos book which wouldn't really appear for another forteen months, Confrontation, the precursor to Necromunda which slowly began to emerge about two years later and "Children of the Horned Rat" which would wait about eighteen years before it was published.

There's an advert for the Predator movie! If every you wanted evidence of the fact that GW has changed its market focus at some point during its history its that the company used to give away 18 certificate VHS tapes to its readers.

What else? A couple of different articles which were essentially just giving away the rules that were about to be released in White Line Fever for Trikes and bootleg turns, rules for 2nd ed Blood Bowl sone of which would eventually make it into a rules supplement (fouling) some of which wouldn't (snotling medics) but all of which depended on a large amount of refering to tables. I remember this type of thing, the time was that if you bought enough White Dwarfs you didn't actually need to buy Gw rules supplements. Obviously this is no good as a business model but it was nice, I think, to use WD to test out rules ideas.

A complete army list for the Norse. Like all army lists at the time its about 3 pages long and includes only a smattering of special rules. The army in essence was a large number of men with shields and swords, some elite foot in heavy armour, some men with bows, some with javelins, dwarves, werewolves and beserkers of both the dwarf and human variety. In a short space it creates an army with quite a nice historical feel but with a decent fantasy element: the werewolves and the capacity of the army wizard to bind a host of magically enchanted bears to the army's service. The really notably thing was that you bought all the models in blister packs of five or so models of "Norse" if I remember correctly, so unless you used mail order actually constructing a unit of similalry armed soliders must have been a collossal pain in the bum.

There is also a chaos renegade army for 40k. Almost everything to do with the characters is random, almost all the equipment is generic, and because there wasn't a fully worked up chaos renegade marine model range at the time (the list is made up of demons, ogres from the fantasy range "human degenerates", orks and gretchen. Very odd but kind of cool. In some respects I wish the concept of renegades that had a more rag tag feel rather than just a legion by any other name was still around.

MOst interesting of all is the letters page, circa 1988 the equivalent of an internet forum. And what are the readers of WD doing at this time? Whining mainly. Thrud the Barbarian is no longer in the magazine, what are you doing? The spell ingredients rules for Warhammer Fantasy Role Play are stupid, That marine in the drawing in issue 105 was holding his missile launcher backwards (to be fair he was, they gave the spotter a box of marines) and, guess what, chaos demons are over powered and my dwarfs and elves will never beat them. I have to say though people seemed to be a lot more jovial about it back then.


Why not try this game for yourself? pluck aWD at random and muse on the changes. I'll do one from another pile later on.

Oh this also featured WD's first battle report. It was a 15,000 vs 18,000 point charity match and had an undead mammoth in it.

Ancre
20-02-2010, 20:02
Ow man, that's so cool, it's almost like a history course, I wasn't born in 1988. :)

Mini77
21-02-2010, 09:33
*sighs* First WD I ever read was 134 which would have been 1990/1991 I think. I'd love to get hold of a copy now.

JoV
21-02-2010, 09:59
I did this recently, it was Andy Chambers explaining the changes he made for the (then) new Imperial Guard Codex (issue number escaped me...sorry...). He explained exactly what he wanted to achieve from the new Codex and how he thought that the previous codex had been lacking (essentially he wanted to bring the 'crazy' back and see more varied lists with things like Priests, Comissar's and so on included). He walked through every change he made and why he made it.

Sigh.

In comparison to the similar Beastmen army book article in the current WD...

Sigh

Crube
21-02-2010, 10:06
I did this a while ago, when I got rid of my early WDs (when I took my 'break' from the hobby, and sold everything)

I got back to WD 109.... and read through a load of the early 110-130 mags... loads of interesting stuff, WFRP campaigns/adventures, Epic being released.... ahhhhhhhh

grissom2006
21-02-2010, 10:54
Have to agree lots of the earlier WD issues are a far better read than the current ones which are very sales focused and less hobby.

Lewis
21-02-2010, 12:02
White Dwarf 143. November 1991.

A change has happened between issue 107 and this one. The last issue had a very generic fantasy image on the front (barbarian fighting ghouls) this one is Blood Angels albeit from a time when Blood Angles were a lot mor generic looking than they are today.

The adverts stand out. One is for a game called Dragon Masters which was a game about the struggle for power amongst High Elves but which was really about the fact that they'd produced a plastic sprue for the Mighty Empires game that had loads of dragons on it that you never used.

Also there is an album that has space marines on the cover (from the original Space Marine boxed game) from a band called D-Rok. Apparently its released under the Warhammer record label....Games Workshop had a record label? Seriously? This didn't seem as odd at the time as it does now: I forget the extent to which wargames, roleplaying games and thrash metal were synonymous in the late eighties. not synonymous enough though as I think this was the last we ever heard of them.

Marauder minatures were still going, the only decent treeman you could get was there. A box of minatures was being released "stompers" which featured a mixture of ork, chaos, eldar, guard and marine models....How ever bought a set like that? In the days before ebay when you could sell stuff off? Admittedly it was a laod of free rules but I remember at the time seeing no point in buying the models with the degree of redundency it entailed.

The last Advanced Heroquest boxed set is for sale, evidentally an issue of last hurrahs for the old non-core games, There are also the concept sketches for Man O' War.

There are incredibly complicated instructions for building Warhammer buildings out of card. It makes a clutz like me glad of the current scenery range.

Epic (or Space Marine as it was called) is central and there is a Jervis vs Andy Chambers, Blood Angels vs Eldar battle report. There is lots of text, lots of discussion of choices and tactics, and very very clear maps. Beautiful. there are also epic painting guides, this really was a main game at one point and quite a cool one too

Ben
21-02-2010, 12:23
White Dwarf 143. November 1991.

A change has happened between issue 107 and this one. The last issue had a very generic fantasy image on the front (barbarian fighting ghouls) this one is Blood Angels albeit from a time when Blood Angles were a lot mor generic looking than they are today.

The adverts stand out. One is for a game called Dragon Masters which was a game about the struggle for power amongst High Elves but which was really about the fact that they'd produced a plastic sprue for the Mighty Empires game that had loads of dragons on it that you never used.

Also there is an album that has space marines on the cover (from the original Space Marine boxed game) from a band called D-Rok. Apparently its released under the Warhammer record label....Games Workshop had a record label? Seriously? This didn't seem as odd at the time as it does now: I forget the extent to which wargames, roleplaying games and thrash metal were synonymous in the late eighties. not synonymous enough though as I think this was the last we ever heard of them.

Marauder minatures were still going, the only decent treeman you could get was there. A box of minatures was being released "stompers" which featured a mixture of ork, chaos, eldar, guard and marine models....How ever bought a set like that? In the days before ebay when you could sell stuff off? Admittedly it was a laod of free rules but I remember at the time seeing no point in buying the models with the degree of redundency it entailed.

The last Advanced Heroquest boxed set is for sale, evidentally an issue of last hurrahs for the old non-core games, There are also the concept sketches for Man O' War.

There are incredibly complicated instructions for building Warhammer buildings out of card. It makes a clutz like me glad of the current scenery range.

Epic (or Space Marine as it was called) is central and there is a Jervis vs Andy Chambers, Blood Angels vs Eldar battle report. There is lots of text, lots of discussion of choices and tactics, and very very clear maps. Beautiful. there are also epic painting guides, this really was a main game at one point and quite a cool one too

This was the first issue I bought.

Epic at the time was great. The core game came with the start of three armies, and while there were army specific sets things like Stompas, which had great stuff for Orks and pretty nifty stuff for everyone else (everyone got dreadnoughts) encouraged people to collect more than one army. There was a box of sprues for Squats, Imperial Guard and Space Marines that gave you the core infantry for 3 good guy forces, you just needed to buy the tanks.

It was the golden age of GW gaming and battle reports and White Dwarf talking to you as if you were a rational being and not a hyped up kid. I had no problem following it (I was ten at the time) and reading modern White Dwarf with the acres of white space and much younger pitch for reading age makes me despair about the next generation.

Battle reports also weren't rigged for "teh newest army" at the time, and were often unrelated to releases at the time (though the armies featured were always in the back with a slight discount from mail order).

Now I feel all old and bitter.

metal bawks
21-02-2010, 14:02
Thank you Lewis, this is an excellent idea for a thread. Here's my contribution:

@Ben: You're not alone in feeling nostalgic.

WD 138

The cover shows Ultramarine terminators fighting Evil Sunz Orks, with much of the space being taken up by the Ork Stompaz. Looks quite old school overall.

The inside cover shows an advert for Death's Dark Shadow, a WFRP supplement. As a kid I remember thinking it looked really creepy.

There's a note saying WD and all GW boxes, cards and counters are printed on 95% recycled paper, made in Finland.

Next we have the usual UK store news, and a map of all the stores - there's 30 of them in all.

Then we move onto new releases. Notable things include new Empire models by the Perry twins (still look good even today IMO), Space Fleet (the predecessor to BFG) and some novels, including the Vampire Genevieve by Jack Yeovil, the last (and, sadly, weakest) part of the Konrad trilogy, Ian Watson's Space Marine and finally a Dark Future novel bu Brian Craig. Also, there's an announcement that a compilation of WD articles for WH40k will be released.

Next is an advert for a complete Dark Elf army by Marauder. I have to say the look of the army has changed quite a bit since then. Still, they're pretty good models for their time I think. The price? 140 quid for 3000 points.

The GW Middelsborough grand opening gives some great offers - e.g. buy 2 blister packs and get one free, as well as 10 and 25% off vouchers which can be used for any GW product.

Next in line is a WFRP article about social levels, which I found to be a good read, but rather inpractical in game terms.

Then we have someting you definitely won't find in the modern WD - an ad for the hard rock/heavy metal mag "Metal Hammer".

We move on to a sample Alaitoc craftworld army by Andy Chambers, with an extensive painting guide by Mike McVey. Here we see the now-lost Guardians with Lasguns and storm Guardians with Power Swords! There's also a Gaurdian standard bearer. The support weapons, psykers and Aspect warrior's equipment has remained pretty much the same, even 20 years later. I wish the new guardians were more customizable; the older ones seem to have more personality. IMO. There's also quite a bit of background on Exarchs, Aspect warriors and Seers. That, too, has changed very little over the years, and IMO proves how good the old background was. Overall, a very valuable article.

Next up is a 6-mission campaign for Space Hulk, set on Necromunda. The background is solid, and the campaign seems quite complex, with the marine player having a total of 55 Terminators (!), and the 'Stealers being supported by plenty of Hybrids and psykers. Interestingly, the marines do not go head-to-head with the Patirarch, opting instead to try poisoning him by dropping nerve gas into the air shaft.

Then there's some new Henchmen for Advanced Heroquest. This is essentially an excerpt from the AHQ supplement "Terror in the Dark". They did that quite a bit back then.

We move on to the old-school Brettonian knights, who look noticeably less ornate and more "gritty" than the current ones. They also have a male wizard with them. There's another (good) painting guide here.

An advert for Warhammer Fantasy Battle is next. At this time, all the army lists were combined into a single book simply called "Warhammer Armies". Oh, how things have changed.

Next up is a part of the rules for Confrontation, Necromunda's predecessor. From what can be seen here, this game was made to be very realistic - and deadly. The days of WD having entire rule sets are long-gone.

Lastly, we come to the mail order section, which has some quite cool models, including Norse Dwarfs and the then-amazing (not that they look bad now) Grey Knight Terminators, standard Terminators, Inquisitors in terminator armour, and finally what may well be the first Traitor Terminators. The Chaos guys are far less spiky than their modern equivalents. Finally, there's some Eldar, which include a curiously small Avatar (it's only a head taller than the other Eldar).

Lewis
21-02-2010, 14:07
I have that Avatar somewhere!

snottlebocket
21-02-2010, 14:14
I think the best years of the white dwarf were around issue 190.

192 was the first issue of white dwarf that I read. Of the top of my head it had several pages of excellent painting tutorials. (blood and rust stains)

Gaming articles on Eversor Assasins, some epic vehicles, dwarf tactics, a really nice article on a huge multi level warhammer quest dioarama by mike mcvey. A rather nice Necromunda battle report and ofcourse a card section in the middle for new magic item cards or 40k datasheets.

Most of those articles were several pages long of genuinely helpful advice and opinions rather than just long winded advertisement sermons for the releases of that month.

Tommygun
21-02-2010, 14:33
I did this last week before throwing out 6 years worth of White Dwarfs.
I spent too much time looking at old articles and not enough time looking at what I was stacking in those piles.
So far I now know I threw out my Space Marine Codex and possibly a few others as well.:cries:

e2055261
21-02-2010, 23:32
I can kind remember WD 99 and 125. My involvement with the hobby was fleeting at this time. Whilst the magazine may have been good, the games at this time were lacking a bit. Most of it centred around roleplay. They had many games at the time such as Dark Future, Advanced Hero Quest, etc. Does anyone remember Combat Cards? I still have mine. Well one of my mates has and he insists on playing them when we hit the drink...very tedious:)

My take on this nostalgia is that, since these issues were 20 odd years ago, we were all younger and much more impressionable; more easily impressed. I'm sure that the same feelings will come up 20 years from now regarding current issues of WD - Heaven forbid!

Theofrastus Bombastus
22-02-2010, 03:19
I did this last week before throwing out 6 years worth of White Dwarfs.
I spent too much time looking at old articles and not enough time looking at what I was stacking in those piles.
So far I now know I threw out my Space Marine Codex and possibly a few others as well.:cries:

Why the hell would you throw something out if you could sell it or give it to somebody who would appreciate it? Did you at least recycle?

Tommygun
22-02-2010, 04:27
Why the hell would you throw something out if you could sell it or give it to somebody who would appreciate it? Did you at least recycle?

Didn't have anyone to give them to and they don't have a lot of hobby content in them anymore.
They are mostly sales catalogs now.
That was the original reason I decided to clean them out and I need the room.
I don't know if you can get any real money for them on Ebay? Maybe older ones, which these weren't.
They did go into the recycling bin.
Six months from now they will be Imperial toilet paper.

Dai-Mongar
22-02-2010, 04:40
Hey, this looks like fun! Let me have a go with the first WD I ever read, my brother's issue 180.
First thing to notice is that it came with a FREE PLASTIC KHORNE BERZERKER! When was the last time they threw in a free mini? That being said, it looks a bit dated now.
Nice cover artwork of Warlord Titans at war, entitled Fists of Death apparently, by Gerry Grace (I never heard of him since).
News section has a nice little editorial from Robin Dews, who reminices about the recent GD and picks out some of his favourite new releases. New releases include WD Presents: Chaos Dwarfs, Chaos sorcerers & familiars for WFB, Catachan jungle fighters, new Land Speeder and Chaplains for 40K, Halflings and Skaven mutants for Blood Bowl, various Knights, superheavy tanks and Ork wagons for Epic.
There's a guide on how to paint the free Berzerker, not very illuminating.
Nice 3-page spread on the Catachans, introducing the death world and outlining the new direction for IG (several different regiments being available) with a preview of how some of the new rules work (weapons teams this issue).
Next, a surprisingly detailed tactics article about cavalry in WFB by Jake Thornton, imaginitively entitled "CHARGE!"
Followed by an Epic article on how to arm Titans (Fists of Death) by a youthful-looking Gav (nice bro mo by the way ;)). Hard to follow for me as I never played that edition of Epic.
Then we have several photos of GD '94, with somewhat humble-looking gaming tables, but huge crowds nonetheless. In one photo a lucky 12-year-old b****** carries off copies of 40K, WFB, Space Marine, Titan Legions and Blood Bowl boxed games. Other photos show Blanche signing autographs, people trying out the new Warhammer Quest game, lots of cool banners (do people still make those?) and only a brief shot of what appears to be a rather lovely Epic board. Pics like these always made me want to go to a GD. :)
Next there's a tactic section for Blood Bowl Halfling teams by Jeremy Vetock, including the inevitable Halfling-throwing play.
Finally, the battle report, and boy did I ever love reading this when I was a lad! Orks commanded by Adrian Wood (of course) against Slayer Sword winner Fred Reed's Howling Griffons Space Marines chapter in a 2000 point battle. After 4 turns of mayhem and hillarity the Howling Griffons take the victory 24 VPs to 13.
And then the usual Mail Order pages, plus a nice piccy of a battle between High Elves and Chaos Dwarfs on the back cover.
Ah, what memories! I think, however, that I spent more time just looking at the pictures as a kid!

nanktank
22-02-2010, 05:16
I dont have it anymore but I think I can remember most of the stuff in the first WD I bought it was 174 and on the cover was Death Zone a supplement for 3rd ed bloodbowl. Morg'n'Throg had just been release as had Griff Oberweld and The mighty Zug (apologies for the spelling if it was wrong), there was a datafax for the space marine razorback in 40k 2nd ed and the battle report was a large battle between empire and undead. In fact I also remember the mail order section had deals on the armies used in the battle report.

Dai-Mongar
22-02-2010, 05:41
I dont have it anymore but I think I can remember most of the stuff in the first WD I bought it was 174 and on the cover was Death Zone a supplement for 3rd ed bloodbowl. Morg'n'Throg had just been release as had Griff Oberweld and The mighty Zug (apologies for the spelling if it was wrong), there was a datafax for the space marine razorback in 40k 2nd ed and the battle report was a large battle between empire and undead. In fact I also remember the mail order section had deals on the armies used in the battle report.

I'm pretty sure I got that one too. It was a battle report with Dieter Helschnict, right?

RevEv
22-02-2010, 08:21
I came across some very early WD in a book shop last year (issues 74 and 89 IIRC). They were extremely interesting to look at from a content point of view, not because of the articles but the games featured and the adverts included.

Yes, that's right, adverts.

About 50% of the magazine was made up of adverts from third parties. The rest of the magazine was made up of articles for D&D, a few hinting at futuristic gaming, and some model articles. And of course there was Thrud the Barbarian.

It brought back some memories - I used to browse the early WD in the newsagent by the station while waiting for my train home from school. Then, as now, I would never buy the early magazines as there were too many adverts. In contrast I am a subscriber for modern WD as they are very good value for money and have been increasingly so for a while (a great improvement on 4 years ago when they were glorified catalogues).

RobC
22-02-2010, 13:58
RevEv: bear in mind that, at the time, finding out about roleplay and wargaming products wasn't anywhere near as easy as it is now. White Dwarf was a way for readers to find out what companies were selling. And, of course, Games Workshop wasn't an own-brand shop.

hereticdave
22-02-2010, 20:04
I dont have it anymore but I think I can remember most of the stuff in the first WD I bought it was 174 and on the cover was Death Zone a supplement for 3rd ed bloodbowl. Morg'n'Throg had just been release as had Griff Oberweld and The mighty Zug (apologies for the spelling if it was wrong), there was a datafax for the space marine razorback in 40k 2nd ed and the battle report was a large battle between empire and undead. In fact I also remember the mail order section had deals on the armies used in the battle report.

Mine was 172, with Morg'n'Thorg on the cover :) Classic mags.

I think going through my collection and looking from those i buy now to when i first started and ensuring my rose-tinted glasses aren't on the things that stand out really are the quality of the articles and the personable nature of them.

The ads, 3rd party or GW have always been there and are in every magazine. The big difference is that when someone was given space to talk about something they had alot and the discussed it indepth whereas alot of similar articles now are a glossy overview. Similarly for battle reports, the report itself is no longer written by the players but by a third party talking about it. Takes all the fun out of it, you only actually get to see the actual players perspective in the ending paragraph conclusion.

Art Is Resistance
22-02-2010, 22:02
The first issue I can lay my hands on (not the first I have mind you - that accolade go to issue 50) is issue 86 - February 1987
Quick look down the contents page:
Open Box - Price Of Freedom, Hawkmoon, Paranoia & D&D reviews
Critical Mass - Books column by David Langford (for trivia fans, this column lives on in SFX magazine!)
Curse Of The Bone - Call Of Cthulhu scenario
Open Box Extra - Dragonlance reviewed
Thrudd - Comic Strip (still published by Carl Critchlow as an indie!)
Illuminations - a look at the work of Ian Miller
Out Of The Garden - a scenario for WFRP
Skaven Scramblers - a FREE cardstock team for Blood Bowl (I still have these in my 1st ed BB box - used them a lot)
It's A Kind Of Magic - Hi Tech fantasy article
'Evy Metal - Dave Andrews
Dogs Of War - Mercenaries in RPGs
The Trouble With Time - a scenario for Judge Dredd RPG
Letters
Gobbldigook - Comic Strip
Classifieds.
Total Page count:64
Total Ad count:28 - nearly 50%!
Saying that, the early years are the golden years for me. I played out dozens of games from WD, making it really good value for money.

I'm losing faith in WD now, even after so many loyal years, and so many last chances. My gaming tastes are changing again (WW1 / FOW are more in my focus that 40k or WFB - I'm just... bored of the rules and settings), and I think my subscription money will soon be going to WI instead, as it reminds me of the old, 'classic' WD, with experimental rules, reviews, background articles - the kinds of things that inspire even through advertising.

Lewis
22-02-2010, 22:33
I liked the eighties, it was a good mix of GW and outsider games. You get back into the seventies and there's less and less stuff you can recognise or make use of. Its a real tribute to Call of Cthulhu that you could still use the rules in those magazines from the mid eighties today.....The Warhammer world we play in today only exists because of that game.

AndrewGPaul
23-02-2010, 09:51
The first White Dwarf I ever bought was issue 130 (October 1990). The over was from one of the Heroquest expansions, with the Barbarian chained to the floor in front of the Liche King/Necromancer/Chaos Sorceror.

Articles included Praetorians (i.e. the Capitol Imperialis and Hellbore super-heavy tunneler) for Epic, the background article for Confrontation, complete with the concept art for the Adeptus Arbites as we know them today, a short story introducing Inquisitor Kryptmann and what is, I believe, the very first battle report between Jervis Johnson and Andy Chambers (1st edition Epic, Orks (Jervis) vs Space Marines (Andy)). One of the first ones, as far as I know, to use colour photos of the battle, rather than just hand-drawn maps.

Oh, and regarding GW's "modern" dodgy sales techniques, this WD had the latest Eldar Aspect Warriors, available in blister packs of 4 models. Thing is, Aspect Warriors at the time came in units of 5 models, no more, no less. Unless you wanted 4 squads of every Aspect, you'd be left with spares.

Col. Frost
23-02-2010, 12:12
I was looking back through my old WD's (started at 100), and what i difference 20+ years make!

The mags are full of adverts granted, but this is before the interweb and you could count the number of gaming mags in the UK on one hand (off the top of my head Dragon, Dungeon, WD and later GM Magazine).

When new stores opened there was a page of vouchers, and the stores that were open numbered less than 15.

Todays magazine can learn alot from the earlier magazines. The writing style was more mature and even as a 11/12 year old i found that refreshing. The battle report mentined earlier was written as an actual report but interspersed with story telling highlighting what was happening from a narrative point of view.

I still re-read the older issues, the background is largely invalid, the rules obselete but they are still a good read.

Chadjabdoul
23-02-2010, 13:51
What an excellent thread!
Here's my contribution, one of the first WDs I owned, #164

On the cover we've got Mark Gibbons' Plague Fleet cover art, A Chaos Warrior of Nurgle posing on the deck of ship, with beastmen crewing it.
The releases of the month (all mentioned in one page, 'eavy metal pages here and there, feature them all) are some hobgoblins for chaos dwarf armies, Bugman's rangers and the gyro for dwarfs, and a boxed set of 3 beautiful dragon princes of Caledor for 9.99(pounds)

Two page Space Hulk competition/ad including the recently released video game from Electronic Arts.

Introducing Plague Fleet, the first Manowar supplemment bringing 6 (4 for each chaos god, 1 for skaven, 1 for ch.dwarfs) new fleets to the game.

Demon Engines of Khorne, for epic (space marine), with enough rules to field them, followed by the Banelord Titan (again with everything you need for it - including little cutouts to make the appropriate cards).

Doom of the Eldar, latest battle game in the Wargame series (remember those, that used little stacks of counters instead of models? Horus Heresy was one of them) with a beautiful drawing of craftworld Iyanden as a gameboard.

And... after a few more pages for Manowar, comes what has always made this issue memorable for me. A truly great (well writen, very well presented) Fantasy battle report, between two 3.000 point forces of H. Elves and Chaos Dwarfs. Robin Dews v Gary Morley (who gets his happy, not great looking face featured in the mag for the first time!).
Small armies (considering the 3.000 pt size) with distinct units, each with a specific role on the battlefield, making the report very pleasant to read and easy to follow.
In comparison, a battle report of armies this size today would have 3-4 identical units (in an army with everyone painted exactly the same) getting in combat here and there and written with a 'let's get it over with' attitude.

The report is followed by a Modelling Workshop article and the miniatures pages. Decent issue with rules (demon engines of Khorne), great background (the Plague Fleet Article) and a battle report that played its own part in getting me hooked to Warhammer Fantasy.

sliganian
23-02-2010, 14:26
RE: Recycling Old WD's
What a timely topic. :)

I started this last weekend. What I do is go through each one and rip out any Painting/Conversion articles, as those have much longer shelf life than any Rules articles or batrep. There is the occasional issue I am keeping all of (especially ones with good Index Astartes artciles for Chaos and the Salamander SM).

The torn-out articles will be bindered together someday. Otherwise, the rest of magazines go into the blue bin. I think some of us get to a certain age and /or household storage capacity and we realize "If we haven't looked at a magazine from 8 years ago since we bought it, we probably don't need it hanging around the house." Essentially, one finds no value / relevence in the old mags anymore because the game and people writing the games have changed so much. Good conversion ideas, materails and painting tips are the only keepers for me as they can apply to outside the hobby (kids school projects, for instance).

nanktank
23-02-2010, 15:47
I'm pretty sure I got that one too. It was a battle report with Dieter Helschnict, right?

Dieter Helschnict! Thats the one funnily enough the next WD I bought was I think 135 I dont remember much about it save for it had templates for a cardboard baneblade

sparks
23-02-2010, 20:05
@sliganian- did exactly the same a while back myself. Like you say, the only real things worth keeping are the painting and the odd background article usually, which I've now got in one of those picture display wallets as the pages are smaller than A4 and I'm too lazy to bind them!

Lewis
23-02-2010, 21:54
I'm still puling the top mag of each pile in my room so I'm hoping forward quite a bit here. I may go back and do some mid pile ones later.

WD 207 March 1997.

I was only buying WD and this time and not really engaging with the hobby, I can kind of see why I had got out of the hobby at this stage as well, in 40K particularly had this kind of garrish quality to it and this particular issue advertises that wood elf army could be lead by a giant drag queen with butterfly wings.

Epic was about to be released so there is some discussion of that, the vyper had been released this week and is an impressive model that could easily have been released today as its 2nd ed 40K era you get a data card in the middle of the magazine for both it and the Marine attack bike, I used to quite like the data cards but quite possibly because they were simpler than that whole business with the targeting grid that came in at the end of 1st ed and was incredibly fiddly. There's also a sheet of fast attack vehicles enhancement cards.


Idol of Gork replete with card stock buildings is released and there is an article on gaming with allies that seems a bit low on content.

Model porn is creeping in here and there are a lot of "Eavy Metal" pages which are just large photos of what's come out that month. However also on the painintg front there's a diorama of a mercenary attack on a lizardman temple using some excellent regiment of renown models an the truly awful old style slann. Good, but would be blown out of the water by mdern modellers. There is also a kind of giant tower block for playing necromunda on which I remember really liking.



Overall quie nice, a lot of filler just showcasing studio standard models and pushing of sales but also some very inventive examples of modelling, including a section that encourages you to make your own terrain from paper mache.

vladsimpaler
24-02-2010, 03:12
RE: Recycling Old WD's
What a timely topic. :)

I started this last weekend. What I do is go through each one and rip out any Painting/Conversion articles, as those have much longer shelf life than any Rules articles or batrep. There is the occasional issue I am keeping all of (especially ones with good Index Astartes artciles for Chaos and the Salamander SM).

The torn-out articles will be bindered together someday. Otherwise, the rest of magazines go into the blue bin. I think some of us get to a certain age and /or household storage capacity and we realize "If we haven't looked at a magazine from 8 years ago since we bought it, we probably don't need it hanging around the house." Essentially, one finds no value / relevence in the old mags anymore because the game and people writing the games have changed so much. Good conversion ideas, materails and painting tips are the only keepers for me as they can apply to outside the hobby (kids school projects, for instance).

Send the remaining parts of the magazines to me?:)

Huw_Dawson
24-02-2010, 03:29
White Dwarf 275 is at home, sadly, so I can't comment on it any more than simply saying it was a good read for 4 or whatever I paid for it, because it had a lot of genuinely interesting articles in it.

TBH the White Dwarf staff need to take a glance back at history and realise that they could pad out their magazine with private articles on random topics. I recall an issue of mine that had a four-page article on 6th Ed Vampire Count magic and how to use it well, written by a private dude because he wanted to and it would earn him a bit of spending money.

SilentCivilian
24-02-2010, 13:05
First issue i bought was 136. Ultramarines on the cover fighting Chaos i think. I seem to remember it showing how to make some kind of Ork battlewagon out of cardboard and using coffe lids for the wheels. and a smarties tube for the gun. The Ork vehicles all had such great names back then. Gutrippa and Lungbursta are a couple i think.
Cant remember the first issue i read as it was a friends copy but i do remember an Ork Mek using a giant wrench on a bolt of a dreds leg. It was a great mag back then. Alot of what they had in for AHQ i have started converting into a campaign for D&D. Makes for some original campaigns.
I remember my friend and i tried to build the cardboard Baneblade at the time. Not a big suprise that as 2 11 year olds with no prior experience at this kind of thing it did not turn out well.
Does anyone remember the Whirlwind using the rhino kit and a load of empty biro tubes?
Good times. :D

AndrewGPaul
24-02-2010, 17:27
I built one of those battlewagons! The wee square one with 4 big wheels was subsequently released as a resin kit for a short while.

I remember the whirlwind, but not the biro tubes; it used a 40mm slottabase to make the box multilauncher, as I recall. I also built the Baneblade, but on its first outing, it got killed by Wraithguard on the first turn.

Lewis
24-02-2010, 21:24
Cant remember the first issue i read as it was a friends copy but i do remember an Ork Mek using a giant wrench on a bolt of a dreds leg.

That's WD 119. The whirlwind was my first WD I bought, 117.

Angelwing
25-02-2010, 05:16
Oh, and regarding GW's "modern" dodgy sales techniques, this WD had the latest Eldar Aspect Warriors, available in blister packs of 4 models. Thing is, Aspect Warriors at the time came in units of 5 models, no more, no less. Unless you wanted 4 squads of every Aspect, you'd be left with spares.

They have of course done this for years (as you point out). However, back then you could ring up mail order and buy specific individual models to fill out units. A minor pain, but it still could be done.

AndrewGPaul
25-02-2010, 08:43
Not as convenient as now, when an entire squad comes in one box. It doesn't take weeks for a mail order to arrive, either

I remember you could hear the rustle of pages as the mail order troll flicked through the catalogue trying to find the mini you were talking about. It was even more fun when you were ordering something wierd from a mail order flyer or something. :)

Binky
25-02-2010, 09:26
First thing to notice is that it came with a FREE PLASTIC KHORNE BERZERKER! When was the last time they threw in a free mini? That being said, it looks a bit dated now.

Not long ago, free orc and Terminator when AOBR came out.

Do flick through my old WDs from time to time, got issues going back to the mid 80s (though very sparse selection of the older issues), quite a few of the early 100s though. First WD I bought was 100, but seem to have lost that over the years.

The first GW magazine I read though was a Citadel Journal (with the cover of the Terror of the Lichemaster scenario pack as it's cover), was an interesting read though, basically a page or so each about a number of new releases, usually just a reprint of the story from the back of the box, plus stats and a few photos. There was also an article about the new plastic Skeleton Horde set (3.95 for 24 skeletons!) and lots of black and white catalog pages at the back, including right at the end, the first metal Space Marine models.

I got it on Christmas morning and spent ages reading it from cover to cover, I had a few miniatures at that point but it was that mag that really got me hooked!

AndrewGPaul
25-02-2010, 14:38
Over the years, I've had a free Space Marine (2nd edition 40K), Khorne Berserker, a pair of skinks (5th edition Warhammer), a transfer sheet, a metal Necron, an elf special character for Mordheim and the Ork Nob and Terminator from Black Reach. Not to mention a good few posters.

Dai-Mongar
26-02-2010, 12:28
Ah, I forgot about the Black Reach minis, they do that for most of the new core editions. Should be some freebies coming with WFB 8th then. :D

Art Is Resistance
26-02-2010, 20:04
I wouldn't bet on it.... Given the poor quality of the mag now, they'll more than likely just give us a poorly worded ad!

It's only by going through old issues that we notice the sheer cliff that WD has dropped off. I think I'll bask in my old issues from the 80's and 90's, and burn the rest!

I'll dig a few more out tonight and post a few lines on them.

Memnon
01-03-2010, 14:47
Wow, serious nostaligia moments here!

Inpired by this thread I looked at my pile of WD's- a stack beginning with 214 and carrying on non-stop until this months! I can't bring myself to get rid of them however, despite them taking up a LOT of space!

214 features Dark Angels on the cover as well as some articles about the ravenwing and epic Tyranids. I remember buying it as part of a deal too- I got the WD, a painting set and a box of genestealers for 12- not only that but i was a 1 short so one of the staffers gave me it- happy days...

Verm1s
02-03-2010, 00:23
I wouldn't bet on it.... Given the poor quality of the mag now, they'll more than likely just give us a poorly worded ad!

... with too many apostrophes.

Great thread, BTW. More please! Me own collection only went back as far as the first Tau release, and most of it's chopped up for articles and recycling. :S

ltsobel
08-03-2010, 12:49
Agreed, great thread!

I think my first one had a crossover between Paranoia and 40k, Citizens versus Orks.

Lewis
09-03-2010, 23:11
That'd be WD112, the one that properly introduced terminators for the first time.

WD 154: October 1992

4th ed had just come out and even as a 12 year old who had only been vaguely into the game for a few years I was experiencing nerd rage. How dare they get rid of the cool stat?

Newcastle was apparently reopeningits store and was doing a buy two red dot items and get a yellow dot item free (the examples they give are rogue trader and the 8 model terminator box gets you the 40k complilation for free, roughly two fifteen quids get you ten free, also 3 for 2 on blister packs. and a few 10% and 25% vouchers. I never intended this to be a GW whinge but they would honestly never do anything like this nowadays, or if they did the yellow dot items would all be pots of paint.

How to build a building in modelling workshop is an array of unfolded nets of buildings for you to cut round on your foamboard (as a twelve year old I remember being fascinated by this multi fascetted substance they were always referring to.) and they cover ideas for all three system: the third being epic. the eavy metal are uninspiring with new high elves showcased and ultramarine should markings being put on show. This was the stark of the red period art wise and it was a time when GW painting was at once garish and bland producing armies of cartoony, bright, but unexceptional models.

Then Rick Priestly talks us through the new edition of warhammer. In five pages the images would fit onto aproximately one and a half of them and the text is small and dense as he goes over major rule changes. March is introduced, an automatic break test is introduced if you loose combat as is a random flee distance and flank and rear bonuses. There didn't used to be flank bonuses? Really? The modern fear test is introduced as is random guessing range for war machines. Magic will come in a seperate box we are told. I didn't like that at the time.

There is then a squats and allied bane blades vs orks epic battle report. god those models were cool in an od way.Its Andy Chambers vs Jervis and Jervis loses.

Painting guide for empire heroes, the rules for goblin doom divers and an index for earlier white dwarves rounds it off. Its actually quite a light read, even compared to today.

What one realises wasn't a light read at this time was the 40K rule books which currently had four books, soon to be five for sale three of which were kind of essential to play the game at all and two of which contained all the army lists.

Discount armies and a catalogue of issue relevant minatures round the magazine off.

AndrewGPaul
09-03-2010, 23:30
There is then a squats and allied bane blades vs orks epic battle report. god those models were cool in an od way.Its Andy Chambers vs Jervis and Jervis loses.

That'd be Ghazgkull at Golgotha. The battle where he captures Yarrick, only to release him later, because good enemies are hard to find. This battle is still referred to in canon, for example here (http://www.games-workshop.com/gws/content/article.jsp?categoryId=cat1300106&pIndex=1&aId=3000023&start=2).

Lewis
10-03-2010, 00:23
No squats mentoined there. hehe.

onidemon
10-03-2010, 02:13
Great thread idea!

Its already been mentioned in this thread, but I have to pull out White Dwarf 136. It was my very first contact with Games Workshop, in a teeny tiny book store in a strip mall in southern Maine .

Two decades later, I actually have this magazine, so lets see how April 1991 holds up:

The Cover - Ultramarines march toward the viewer, laying down fire with a Rogue Trader era Land Raider bringing up the right flank. This is the art from the second Space Marine box set, with the titans in the background mysteriously edited out. Very nice painting, with the armor dinged up and lacking the yellow or gold banding of later revisions. Amusingly, a marine on the left is firing his bolter one handed, while laying down fire from a hand flamer on the left. In the background, marines unable to get a shot appear to just be firing their bolters in the air.

Inside cover - an add for "Freebooters", the third ork army book for rogue trader, dedicated entirely to unique little mercenary squads to add to existing armies. 11 year old me is introduced to the concept of orks with machine guns for the very first time.

There's no editorial or anything, just a few pages of store locations, helpfully showing a map of the British Isle. There's a blurb about how every GW store will teach you how to paint, and an explanation of how to join a League. (You have to fill out a standardized form to submit)

Battle Report: Epic Orks vrs space marines with Jervis Johnson and Andy Chambers - This was an overwhelming article for a boy only used to Battletech. Words are thrown around willy-nilly like "Capitol Imperialis" and "Boar Boy" that were totally alien to me. What made up for it were the black and white bits of artwork showing orks running in the rain and looting cities with vast ape-like warlords in the background. I must have spent hours going over the pictures of the armies lined up, trying to figure out what was what. Looking at it now, the paint jobs on the epic minis are shockingly simple. Goffs are solid black, Bad Moons solid yellow, with not so much as a dot of green on their faces. The marines are all painted in a dingy blue-green color that corresponds to no chapter I've heard of since. In the end the imperium burns down a "Slasher Gargant", breaking the morale of the ork army.

Eavy Metal: Eldar Guardians - painting the old metal guardian figures. Basic painting techniques and color schemes for a handful of craftworlds, with loads and loads of text between the pictures. Includes a picture of eldar assaulting an ork village, in which every single ork has a giant full color back banner. Back banners were big back then. If one looks very close, the only orks without back banners are Goffick rockers, orks with electric guitars and big hair.

Storytime: The Magicians Son by Barrington J Bayley - 9 pages of solid text, broken up by two pictures depicting the main characters. Oddly, it appears to be a complete story, not an add for a book. (Though they do say in the end it will be included in an anthology) In twenty years, I still haven't read this story...

Hilarious Ad: The Slaughterhouse - Imagine you could explore a dungeon with other players, seeking out loot and even fighting other people! Now, imagine its 1991 and WoW and Everquest and even Ultima are fairytale future dreams. Instead, you get The Slaughterhouse, brought to by Steve Jackson games. 300 British pounds in prizes every month! Play a hero, thief, or guard! And its all... over the telephone. Dial 3 for a savage attack! Dial 0 to spare your opponents life! At the bottom it lays out the costs, and I quote here, "Calls cost 33p per minute cheap, 44p per minute all other times". The Slaughterhouse, from the designer of "Fist".

Another Ad: Warhammer novel, "Beasts in Velvet", by Jack Yeovil - The title gives me a chuckle. Sort of a sequel to Knights in White Satin...

Eavy Metal: Bretonnian knights - an article so useful for Bretonnian players its not even funny. This article explains the logic of the colorful heraldry, with "metals and colours" and concepts of lineage. Includes a two page spread of example patterns on basic horse and surcoat profiles. On the last page, they show three of the patterns on actual miniatures.

Warhammer Fantasy Battles: Questions & Answers with Rick Priestly - Rick offers rulings on rule questions sent in by you the reader. When was the last time they did something like this?

Freebooters - Remember the ad from the inside cover? Here's sixteen pages of that book with complete rules for using the merc squads in your army. Things that stand out: wargear is purchased by paying points to roll on random tables, making WYSIWYG gameplay impossible. Every group has a full spread of back banner patterns, as no self respecting ork would be caught dead without a six foot back banner. And what's this? Khorne Stormboyz. Khorne worshipping orks... The funny thing is, they behave more or less like stormboyz. Marching, drilling, the only difference is the little Khorne symbol on their weapons and shoulders. I guess Khorne makes humans into orks, and orks into humans?

Eavy Metal: Marauder undead - Boy there's a lot of painting guides in this magazine. This one explains how to drybrush your undead. No pictures at all, entirely text based. Helpfully, there are pictures of painted undead on the opposite page, but its technically an ad for an army deal.

Modeling Workshop: Ork Gobsmasha - The greatest article ever written by human beings. In this article, they show step by step with lots of pictures how an untalented 11 year old can spend the rest of their life making things out of foam core. Included are complete patterns for making the Gobsmasha (a box on big wheels with a cannon), the Bonecruncha (a modern battlewagon without the troop compartment) the Lungbursta (a pretty normal looking tank) and a Braincrusha. (Which is just a massive cannon with wheels and tracks attacked) They finish it off with a datafax for the Gobsmasha, in that terribly fiddly Rogue Trader style. Thanks to this article, all of my ork armies ever have had one of these tanks... though I have gotten better at it over the years.

The End - The last few pages are filled up with black and white pictures of miniatures. The first few pages are all epic, showing off the imperial and ork line. Helpfully, you get to see all the epic miniatures the modeling workshop was trying to recreate in 40k scale, so you know what it's meant to look like when you're done. Also, drop pods, tunneling termite carriers, massive land battle ships... all *so* *cool* to a kid who's never seen anything more exotic than a "Marauder" battlemech. This is followed by a few pages of Eldar guardians. Not much to say about them, except they're way heavily armed, most of them toting around at least two rifle or special class weapons, including chain swords and power weapons. Also, under those pointy helmets, they *all* have mohawks. Oh, and there's Bretonnian Knights for you to paint up like in the article.

Back Cover - another full color painting, of what looks like vaguely middle ages people fighting other vaguely middle ages people at the entrance to a castle. Still not sure who's fighting here... Bretonnia versus the Empire?

And so the magazine came to a close. All in all, it was well worth the two dollars I bummed from my mom to buy it, then the other two dollars I had to go back and ask for when I found out that the 1.95 cover price was in british pounds...

Ah, sweet nostalgia...

AndrewGPaul
10-03-2010, 09:26
That battle report, onidemon, was it with an unidenfified chapter of Space Marines in dark green? If so, it was the first Andy vs Jervis battle report.


Another Ad: Warhammer novel, "Beasts in Velvet", by Jack Yeovil - The title gives me a chuckle. Sort of a sequel to Knights in White Satin...

Beasts in Velvet is awesome, if you can get hold of it. Warhammer Fantasy Battle meets Red Dragon, Dixon of Dock Green, Dirty Harry and Les Miserables.

The Magician's Son never did end up in an anthology. I can only assume they had plans to publish a 4th anthology before Warhammer Books went tits-up, and by the time Hogshead came along, they wanted proper novels. Who Mourns a Necromancer was another one that never even made it into White Dwarf - it had to wait for Inferno! magazine to come along a decade later.

I also built some of those Ork battlewagons. I had to make the wheels out of card, though - my parents drank coffee far too slowly to make using 4 coffe jar lids as wheels a viable option. :) Cracking stuff. Did you know there was briefly a resin miniature of the Gobsmasha available from GW? and do you have any pics of your current one?

Look again at the photo on the back. See how all the miniatures' bases are hidden? They don't make battle shots like that any more. :)

Dai-Mongar
10-03-2010, 10:00
The chapter was the Valedictors, according to the picture. I'd hazard a guess that it's Andy Chamber's own army, seeing as how the titans are painted exactly like his Iron Warriors.
Also, I was a little concerned about the powder-blue Orks (supposed to be Deathskulls, I think).

Lewis
10-03-2010, 21:42
One of my favourite back of a magazine dioramas was one which had 40k models in the foreground with epic models further back to create a sense of false perspective. WD117 I think.

onidemon
11-03-2010, 01:32
That battle report, onidemon, was it with an unidenfified chapter of Space Marines in dark green? If so, it was the first Andy vs Jervis battle report.

I do believe so, its a funky aqua-marine sort of color, like the gunk you'd find in a sink drain... a far cry from the bright reds and yellows you'd find epic marines showing off later on. Man I do still love that game. So this was their first ever game together?




Beasts in Velvet is awesome, if you can get hold of it. Warhammer Fantasy Battle meets Red Dragon, Dixon of Dock Green, Dirty Harry and Les Miserables.

Dag, that's a lot of awesome in one place. Personally, I always wanted to check out those Dark Future books White Dwarf was always advertising in the wake of Dark Future. In particular, "Comeback Tour", with secret agent Elvis Presley fighting chaos cultists in a world that never knew rock and roll. I hear they republished some of these old books with an updated future timeline, but to me its just not the same if its not the Dark Future of 1996.



I also built some of those Ork battlewagons. I had to make the wheels out of card, though - my parents drank coffee far too slowly to make using 4 coffe jar lids as wheels a viable option. :) Cracking stuff. Did you know there was briefly a resin miniature of the Gobsmasha available from GW? and do you have any pics of your current one?

I thought the 40k scale resin Gobsmasha was an Epicast creation? I do miss the Epicast and Armorcast era 40k items. The modern plastic and resin kits produced by GW and Forgeworld blow them away in terms of quality and detail, but its hard to forget that you could once get a Warhound titan for 40k for $60... But that's an issue for another day.

I had to use card wheels as well, though what I did was cut a few layers of foam core, lay them together to make a thicker wheel, then wrap the cardboard around the outer edges. Weapons were the tricky part... I had one perfectly nice Lungbursta get ruined when the candy tube I used for the cannon turned out to curl up and pucker when spray painted. Oddly, I played it like that for years anyway; imperfections are not deal breakers on ork vehicles.

Sadly, I have no pictures to show off, at least not until I get a working camera. I think I still have one particularly sad looking Gobsmasha left, and its evolutionary offspring, a scratchbuilt looted Leman Russ. The Russ isn't quite finished, as after a few games it turned out to be too fragile to bother with as a 'looted wagon'. Luckily, my one friend I game with regularly and I switched back to using 2nd edition rules for our own private games, and in 2nd edition a looted Russ is a rolling, clanking god of doom, so maybe that one will get finished up soon and I can show it off in the projects section.


The chapter was the Valedictors, according to the picture. I'd hazard a guess that it's Andy Chamber's own army, seeing as how the titans are painted exactly like his Iron Warriors.
Also, I was a little concerned about the powder-blue Orks (supposed to be Deathskulls, I think).

I checked, and that's exactly right, Valedictors from a sample regiment shown off in a previous white dwarf. A regiment, since the game was technically taking place during the Horus Heresy, before the creation of chapters. Perhaps ten thousand years prior to 40k, orks painted themselves and their clothing powder blue?:)

I actually copied Andy's color scheme for my own titan legion, gray with brass fittings. If and when I get around to doing up a titan legion again, I've got to go with bright colors just for a change of pace. And, clearly my 40k orks need some backbanners...

AndrewGPaul
11-03-2010, 09:15
Dag, that's a lot of awesome in one place. Personally, I always wanted to check out those Dark Future books White Dwarf was always advertising in the wake of Dark Future. In particular, "Comeback Tour", with secret agent Elvis Presley fighting chaos cultists in a world that never knew rock and roll. I hear they republished some of these old books with an updated future timeline, but to me its just not the same if its not the Dark Future of 1996.

I bought the reprints. To be honest, there's not many changes - they're set in 2025 not 1996, and there's a few references to things which happened since 1996 (one character mentions t.A.T.u, briefly), but they're still the same. Comeback Tour is awesome. The world did know rock and roll - Elvis became a Sanctioned Op after faking his own death and going into hiding.

All the "Jack Yeovil" books have been reprinted. Kid Zero (Ghost Dancer in the US) hasn't been reprinted, nor has the Route 666 anthology. There's a fansite somewhere that has a synopsis of what the final book in the series, United States Cavalry, would be about; it's a bit crazy. :)


I thought the 40k scale resin Gobsmasha was an Epicast creation?

Not sure. I definitely remember seeing it in a GW store in the early 90s, in proper Citadel Miniatures packaging. One of the Citadel Journals had pictures of one that had been converted with more recent 40K kit parts, such as the barrel from a Leman Russ and some newer Ork bolters. Man, now I want to go and build some cardstock tanks. :)


I checked, and that's exactly right, Valedictors from a sample regiment shown off in a previous white dwarf.

Issue 126, where the first actual army list for Space Marines in Space Marine was printed.

Lewis
11-03-2010, 17:58
I've got a couple of spare copies of Route 666 if anyone wants them I think. The site that details all of this Dark Future stuff is called Future Highways.

onidemon
12-03-2010, 01:19
I bought the reprints. To be honest, there's not many changes - they're set in 2025 not 1996, and there's a few references to things which happened since 1996 (one character mentions t.A.T.u, briefly), but they're still the same. Comeback Tour is awesome. The world did know rock and roll - Elvis became a Sanctioned Op after faking his own death and going into hiding.

Awesome! See, that's why I thought the 90s setting is important; it implies its an alternate universe, and its necessary for Elvis to be in anything like fighting shape :) On the other hand, I read some synopsis bits, where John Lennon is the labor MP, commenting on how Elvis's early work had made him want to be a musician. And wasn't Nelson Mandela the Pope, fighting the creeping influence of Chaos?

Man, GW needs to bring that setting back... Re-release the "Dark Future" box set with modern sculpting. I can see it now, big plastic modular road sections! :D


Not sure. I definitely remember seeing it in a GW store in the early 90s, in proper Citadel Miniatures packaging. One of the Citadel Journals had pictures of one that had been converted with more recent 40K kit parts, such as the barrel from a Leman Russ and some newer Ork bolters.

By chance was it this one?

http://cgi.ebay.com/Ork-Epicast-Gobsmasha-WH40k-Scarpia-Original_W0QQitemZ160411642912QQcmdZViewItemQQptZL H_DefaultDomain_0?hash=item2559476c20

That is a nice one, doubly so for being imaginative. A lot of the Epicast stuff were just direct translations of an epic item into 40k scale, but that one has a different profile and is quite nice.


Man, now I want to go and build some cardstock tanks. :)

Me too, though I'm cursed to be primarily working on a Tyranid army right now. (Ironically, not for the new codex, but for use with the 2nd edition army book) I say cursed because, anyone can bang together a good looking ork vehicle. And, a skilled person can make a good imperial vehicle. And a really just especially amazing person can make an Eldar vehicle. But Tyranid... unless you're breaking out the modeling clay, you can't just sift through the bitz box for good gubbinz to stick on willy nilly.

Anywho, before I go too far off track, someone needs to review another old White Dwarf. I'm resisting grabbing the 2nd White Dwarf I ever bought and reviewing that...

AndrewGPaul
12-03-2010, 08:31
By chance was it this one?

http://cgi.ebay.com/Ork-Epicast-Gobsmasha-WH40k-Scarpia-Original_W0QQitemZ160411642912QQcmdZViewItemQQptZL H_DefaultDomain_0?hash=item2559476c20

That is a nice one, doubly so for being imaginative. A lot of the Epicast stuff were just direct translations of an epic item into 40k scale, but that one has a different profile and is quite nice.

No, not that one. There's one on the Collecting Citadel Miniatures wiki, listed as "Monolith Gobsmahsa 1", but they reckon only 30 were made. The wheels were smaller, and of a different style.

Lewis
12-03-2010, 23:36
[QUOTE=onidemon;4475325]Awesome! See, that's why I thought the 90s setting is important; it implies its an alternate universe, and its necessary for Elvis to be in anything like fighting shape :) QUOTE]

As it goes he'd been treated with this anti-aging process that stopped him from looking any older than he did when he came out of the army.

WD123 March 1990.

I remeber aged 9 not bothering to buy this issue and having to go back and get it later because it was primarily a lengthy extract from a book that would become "'Ere We Go" the first ork "codex". As an aside it would be worth commenting on this volume and its companions. This was a time you see when space marines didn;t even have their own book, they had one that they shared with the army list for Harlequins and a couple of other armies. They also had T3, the wimps. By 1992 however the orks had reached a point where they had two heavy duty rule books, each about the size of two current codexes, hard bound, as well as a book entirely devoted to the background of the race. Those who think the marines get a disproportionate amount of attention today should look over Waargh the Orks, 'Ere We Go and Freebooterz to see what lavishing of attention really looks like.

Lets talk about the army list in WD123 first.It is chracterised by a plethora of Wayne England art. Orks here look skinnier, leaner, more wiry and wickedly inventive. They are bigger than the spindly grots but still have the appearnace that reminds you of the goblins from Labyrinth on the likable monster front, illusrations of the Odd Boyz particularly stand out. This is back in the days when orks were ws 3 bs 3, and these orks certainly look this way.

here's fuller colour plates for variants colour schemes for each of the clans, anmdthen pages and pages of units. A couple of things that stand out:

feral ogre units, unashamedly fantasy ogres in your army. Charts and tables and fiddly special rules. There are generic weapons that are used by ork and imperium alike. Random bionic and Mad Boyz. It must have been icredibly unweildy to play but it really fired the imagination.

Elsewhere in the issue there is an orc vs chaos battle report, one is sturck by how little one could fit in a warhammer army at the time in some respects, 20 beastmen cost 375 points. the whole thing is two pages long.

There are a range of data sheets for a range of imperial tanks for epic, including a capitol imperials (essential a giant imperial take on the Jawa sand crawler) and many key features of the current guard codex as well as the lung bursta, spleen rippa and all those variant ork vehicles in their earliest form.


There isn't much else to this issue but it does make me want to collect a 2nd ed orc army to game with.

onidemon
13-03-2010, 22:52
As it goes he'd been treated with this anti-aging process that stopped him from looking any older than he did when he came out of the army.

Ah, well that explains it!


By 1992 however the orks had reached a point where they had two heavy duty rule books, each about the size of two current codexes, hard bound, as well as a book entirely devoted to the background of the race. Those who think the marines get a disproportionate amount of attention today should look over Waargh the Orks, 'Ere We Go and Freebooterz to see what lavishing of attention really looks like.

The fact orks once had three hard bound rulebooks still floors me... I'm lucky enough to own Ere We Go and Freebooters too, so I've gotten to read most of it. What amuses me is that most of the random bionics and mad-dok rules from Ere We Go went on to become the Gorkamorka Dok visit rules. I just wish they'd bring back the descriptions of various squigs and fungus that grow around ork encampments. Like the disease of "going fungoid", in which sometimes a grot who sits in the drops will get so bored, he'll accidentally take root and cease being an ambulatory living creature, devolving into a plant with a grot face. Helpfully, they explain orks only eat such plants on special occasions. (Presumably only on the Ork holiday known as "Hey, lets eat something we found in the drops!")

Come to think of it, do they still describe the drops in modern Ork fluff?


There are a range of data sheets for a range of imperial tanks for epic, including a capitol imperials (essential a giant imperial take on the Jawa sand crawler) and many key features of the current guard codex as well as the lung bursta, spleen rippa and all those variant ork vehicles in their earliest form.

I do love the Capitol Imperialis. A shame they built it on a plastic tread and tank body, so that as soon as that plastic mold went, the kit couldn't be made. I never understood why they didn't just cast the treads in lead at the point the plastic wasn't feasable.

Also, I love epic, and I love orks, but I could swear they released the various ork battlewagons for epic as new products in every other white dwarf from 1988 through 1993. It was a bit like how the siege of Helms Deep feels in modern issues of White Dwarf, like they just keep finding a way to re-introduce it...

AndrewGPaul
15-03-2010, 09:39
It was even better than that - the Orks had two hardback rulebooks (albeit thinner than Realms of Chaos and one book entirely devoted to background! Waaagh! The Orks had no rules in it whatsoever (and is also the one 1st edition rulebook I don't own, annoyingly). I don't think anybody got anything like that until the Black Library printed things like the Sabbat Worlds Crusade book.

Chaos and Evil
15-03-2010, 11:09
I do love the Capitol Imperialis. A shame they built it on a plastic tread and tank body, so that as soon as that plastic mold went, the kit couldn't be made. I never understood why they didn't just cast the treads in lead at the point the plastic wasn't feasable.
As I understand it, the plastic tread set was actually licenced from a model tanks manufacturer, and after a while GW let the licence to use that sprue lapse.

AFAIK the tank kit the tracks originally came from is still in production.

Osbad
15-03-2010, 13:29
Its Andy Chambers vs Jervis and Jervis loses.

A sad mantra for our times...