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gwarsh41
25-02-2010, 21:28
It's a bit of a strange question I know, but it has been bugging me. I have never seen someone mention that their models only move cm instead of in.
However there are only 3 countries in the world that use imperial measurement. So is it metric or imperial in non US countries?

MasterDecoy
25-02-2010, 21:30
imperial. its easier.

Lord of Worms
25-02-2010, 21:34
Certain specialist games use cm like Epic and Gothic. Here in Canada technically we use metric, but Imperial is used in construction for the most part (it's really confusing and stupid).

Cromwell Haarlock-Leth
25-02-2010, 22:03
Even in France, we use (usually) the imperial system for WH40K.

But our tables tend to be 1,20m x 1,80m, not 6'x4'.

gwarsh41
25-02-2010, 22:25
That really surprises me, I always assumed that because it is a Europe based company that metric would be used. Thanks for the quick responses though, I can imagine it being pretty confusing to use metric and imperial.

Falkman
25-02-2010, 22:32
The game is always referring to inches, so we kinda have no choice but to play by that.
Even though we don't use imperial measurements in our daily lives it's not really confusing since the game is pretty clear with how to measure everything, and measure tapes with inches exist here as well.

Lord Malice
25-02-2010, 22:34
You know that Imperial measuring was developed in the same country as Games Workshop? I knew an American at university and he was also surprised that in the UK we use miles and inches; we also like to use pounds and ounces (and stones) too although you run the risk of being fined if you sell fruit and veg in pounds and ounces.

Bloodknight
25-02-2010, 22:51
Spain uses cm for the Warhammer games.

Germany doesn't, we use the Imperial system for the games. It does help, however, that we have a pre-SI-unit called "Zoll", which happens to be exactly 1 inch ;).

Rombo Baak
25-02-2010, 22:51
In Spain we use the metric system for WH40k. It's not exactly the same but works allright.

WinglessVT2
25-02-2010, 22:58
In Sweden, we use inches for fantasy and 40,000, but centimeters for lord of the rings.

bigcheese76
25-02-2010, 23:06
I like how Warhammer uses the Imperial Inches system. It is dying as everyone is moving to metres, so its nice to play Warhammer and stick with the old system.
It is because of warhammer, most of my DIY is still done in Inches and feet.

solkan
25-02-2010, 23:10
The Japanese codices are written using 1" = 2cm for everything, and only centimeters are used, so Japan is at least officially playing 40k using metric.

For example, the range of a boltgun in 48cm, and lash of submission moves the target unit 2D6x2cm.

Rombo Baak
25-02-2010, 23:15
Lol, so the only ones that use the metric system are the japanese and spanish gamers?

Gimp
25-02-2010, 23:19
South Africa is metric but we use the imperial inches when playing

Cromwell Haarlock-Leth
25-02-2010, 23:25
For example, the range of a boltgun in 48cm, and lash of submission moves the target unit 2D6x2cm.

But the range of a bolter should be 60,96cm! (61cm)
That's a huge difference...
Do you use the same table size as we do? (1,20 x 1,80m)
Because, if yes, armies should be awfully slow... moving 12cm instead of 15 (6"), 24cm instead of 30cm (12"), 36cm instead of 45,72cm (18") and turbo-boosters 48cm instead of 61cm (24").
That means that capturing objectives or outflanking takes far more time, and that changes lot of things in a "standard" 6 turns-game.
Solkan,What's your feeling? Does it change things?

SPYDER68
25-02-2010, 23:25
Ill quit if GW changes it inches to CM.. i already have purchased measuring devices for inches and am to invested to change..




Sorry.. i couldnt resist...



(btw.. im j/k for ones who dont realize it, its a common thing that happens with change people getting upset over nothing...)

Azzy
25-02-2010, 23:29
You know that Imperial measuring was developed in the same country as Games Workshop? I knew an American at university and he was also surprised that in the UK we use miles and inches; we also like to use pounds and ounces (and stones) too although you run the risk of being fined if you sell fruit and veg in pounds and ounces.

I think he was less surprised that you use Imperial units as opposed that you still use Imperial units. Just like I'm surprised that anyone still uses Imperial units when the metric system is superior, easier to use and used internationally. :D

Spacker
25-02-2010, 23:41
I think he was less surprised that you use Imperial units as opposed that you still use Imperial units. Just like I'm surprised that anyone still uses Imperial units when the metric system is superior, easier to use and used internationally. :D

Try driving in the UK and see if you can easily turn all our MPH speed limit signs into km/h :p I was born in the year the UK started switching to metric (1971!) and we were taught both Imperial and metric at school, and I still tend to use inches, feet, and miles whenever discussing distances, and everyone here uses lbs and stones to discuss weight rather than kg. While we do use metric, pretty much everything bar road speed limit signs, weights on product labels, and the advertising of fuel prices in litres only, use both scales (such as speedometers on vehicles, scales on either side of a rule/tape measure, etc).

Of course, things can still get confusing - the difference between MPG between the US and the UK, for instance, thanks to each country using a different definition of gallon.

AlmightyNocturnus
25-02-2010, 23:48
More about Japan: everything is written using a vastly different metric conversion (as written in Solkan`s post). But most Japanese gamers realize this and all of its problems (for example, they still use a 4 X 6 board but missile launchers only fire 96 cm) so pretty much everyone I`ve ever wargamed with in Japan (and that includes wargamers from Hokkaido to Kagoshima) actually uses imperial measurements.

Almighty Nocturnus

Lord Malice
26-02-2010, 01:16
I think he was less surprised that you use Imperial units as opposed that you still use Imperial units. Just like I'm surprised that anyone still uses Imperial units when the metric system is superior, easier to use and used internationally. :D

I think inches are convenient to use, cm's are just too damn small although I never use fractions of an inch, I use mm's instead; and also miles but never kilometres, metres but never yards. I tend to use whichever of them is most convenient I suppose. It's wierd but then I'm English so it's bound to be :D

Deus
26-02-2010, 04:04
You mean in countries that aren't backward? :P
*gets off soapbox*

PRoeske
26-02-2010, 10:14
Here in the Netherlands, we are using Imperial Measurements in both WHFB en WH40k. This might be becauseq wwe only have the Uk versions of codices. The only books available in Dutch are all of the LOTR stuff and the Startersets for both WHFB and WH40k.

Grt. Pim

Thanatos_elNyx
26-02-2010, 10:30
I'm like Lord Malice, I was born in the crossover generation and can use either.

But our measurement device are all equipped with both scales.

chromedog
26-02-2010, 10:47
I have a couple of mates who used to work in QANTAS engineering.

Their aircraft used English Imperial, US Imperial and metric parts, depending on who made what.

I grew up learning only metric, however, the switch to metric was less than 5 years before my birth and enough adults back then still used Imperial units (they were used to them) so I can freely switch between them.

Helpful when I worked in Govt. stores and had to explain what a ' " ' (inch mark) was on one of the orders (to one of our French pickers). At first I was confused that he didn't know, but then I remembered that they'd had metric far longer than us, and he was unlikely to have ever learned the "english" system.

Bork
26-02-2010, 10:55
I'm Swedish and use imperial for gaming (only). There's no translated version of the game here, thankfully I might add. Rulers marked in inches are getting quite hard to find here but it´s not that hard to add a 2.5 multiplier to all measurements when that happens.

Cromwell Haarlock-Leth
26-02-2010, 11:03
At first I was confused that he didn't know, but then I remembered that they'd had metric far longer than us, and he was unlikely to have ever learned the "english" system.

Indeed. Far, far longer!:D
The French Science Academy gave its first definition in 1791.
Then it was chosen by France as the official length measurement unit on April, 7th, 1795 (not a typo: seventeen ninety five).

lewood
26-02-2010, 15:20
I was introduced to 40k via the Rogue trader book V1 and V2 came out pretty much immediately when I started to play. My friends and I are bilingual and/or bi-nationals so it was not a issue, we used inches. Then GW started to print french book with their centimetres definition (and zillions of incorrect translated rules leading to zillions issues btw :rolleyes:). So when we introduced the game to the 100% french and they came with their codex definition in cm and we had ours in inches we quickly identified the problem and switched to inches.

But sometimes when they played each other they played in cm only as they did not have an imperial tape. Not anymore. That was ages ago in V3.

But to avoid any further issues I now buy all my codex and rulebooks in French but get the novels in English 'cause it sounds much better.:)

Coasty
26-02-2010, 15:27
You know that Imperial measuring was developed in the same country as Games Workshop? I knew an American at university and he was also surprised that in the UK we use miles and inches; we also like to use pounds and ounces (and stones) too although you run the risk of being fined if you sell fruit and veg in pounds and ounces.

Wrong Empire, old boy! Miles and inches are much older than any existing nation, we just refused to drop them when everyone else in Europe went metric.

lewood
26-02-2010, 15:37
Wrong Empire, old boy! Miles and inches are much older than any existing nation, we just refused to drop them when everyone else in Europe went metric.

I don't think you can say that. Here's a quote from Wikipedia:
"The origin of the inch is disputed. Historically, in different parts of the world (even different cities within the same country) and at different points in time, the inch has referred to similar but different standard lengths."

Later in the article it says that oldest records are from Britain:
"After 1066, 1 inch was equal to 3 barleycorn, which continued to be its legal definition for several centuries, with the barleycorn being the base unit"

Spacker
26-02-2010, 17:09
I'd generally dissuade anyone from quoting Wikipedia as "fact". I've seen plenty of references to it originating with King Edward II in the 14th Century which is some 300 years later than the quote you copied from Wiki. Wiki has this too as being the first legal definition of an inch. "After 1066" is way too vague, 2010 is after 1066 for instance yet I know the definition of an inch is certainly older than this year :P I assume 1066 refers to when the Normans invaded and that the use of the barleycorn as a standard measurement was retained despite this.

Bunnahabhain
26-02-2010, 17:39
Wrong Empire, old boy! Miles and inches are much older than any existing nation, we just refused to drop them when everyone else in Europe went metric.

What do you mean, everyone else In Europe.... That makes us sound like part of the place, rather than a somewhat confused and confusing Island vaguely attached in some ways to the continent.

Any measurement system works, so long as you don't try mixing them. Then you end up flying things into Mars at high speed, as the metric control system acts on the Imperial unit thrusters...

BrotherErekose
26-02-2010, 22:41
On topic: One LGS got smart and had a company make tape measures with both cm and inches. Put their game store name & logo on it and ... I dunno, $3.99?

I forgot the other popular game that uses cm here in the USA.

Off ...
;)

What do you mean, everyone else In Europe.... That makes us sound like part of the place, rather than a somewhat confused and confusing Island vaguely attached in some ways to the continent.
..I'm an American (and everything that implies :angel: ). When on a train from Edinburgh to London, I asked an 'employee' about those Wallace and Gromit movies and if he knew where Wensleydale was, you know, the cheese place Wallace is excited about?

He responded, "I'm Scottish. I don't give a ... F something, about the English." I didn't hear clearly him as another train went by ....

So, even *that* isn't part of the UK, is it? There was also an issue with Scottish banks not taking UK money, as I recall.
;)

mattjgilbert
26-02-2010, 22:56
Scotland is a part of the UK and money either side of the border is legal on the other side. There may of course be some historical grudges ;)

Anyway... I can switch between inches and cm quite freely. For DIY I use either or even a mix of both. Driving here in the UK is in miles and when I think of driving distances I think that way rather than km. I'll buy a pint of beer or milk but will happily measure ml for cooking.

Basically, in the UK we have to deal with both and you just get used to it. :) For gaming, all tape measures have both scales so it wouldn't really matter which one was used.

Injektilo
26-02-2010, 23:16
I'm stuck with kind of a strange mixture, which I'd imagine is common in Britain, only inches and feet really work for me as measurements of distance (I was taught in cms as far as I can recall, but sadly, guessing warmachine ranges constantly all through my formative years means the centimetre is dead to me now. :cries:), but liquid measurements are mostly metric.


So, even *that* isn't part of the UK, is it? There was also an issue with Scottish banks not taking UK money, as I recall.
;)

Scotland, England and Wales are Great Britain (I presume that England and Wales could be properly called Britain, without the superlative ;), since those countries correspond to the Roman province of Britannia, whilst what would become Scotland only had brief Roman incursions into the lowlands, was outside the empire and was called Caledonia), throw Northern Ireland into the mix and you get the UK.

Usually it's English shops that don't take Scottish money, due to them being rarer down South, and having the complication of there being three different types of the same value - as for some reason, three banks are allowed to issue them - which causes suspicions of forgery, sometimes hamming up the accent is the only option to speed past incessant squinting at watermarks etc. :o

The Highlander
26-02-2010, 23:20
I grew up using metric measurements, and since I became an engineer, I am incredibly glad that Britain uses SI units (otherwise, my work would be much harder). On the other hand, I also think in terms of miles when driving and feet and inches when talking about someone’s height. I think it’s because imperial measurements are more useful for day to day use, while metric is much better for technical use.

Askari
26-02-2010, 23:35
I feel Imperial measurements are "real-life" measurements. Ask me how tall 1.48 metres is and I'd have no idea, ask me how tall a 5ft 6in person is and I'd get it pretty close. The same is even with wargames, I can more easily guess 6 inches than 19cm, it just fits better in the picture in my head, I could always just convert, but why bother? And I'm from the age where they don't teach us imperial scales in schools (or maybe that just Wales for you)

Spacker
27-02-2010, 09:11
On topic: One LGS got smart and had a company make tape measures with both cm and inches. Put their game store name & logo on it and ... I dunno, $3.99?

Might have been cheaper for them to just import in bulk from the UK - all our tape measures over here have cm and inches on them :)

Radium
27-02-2010, 10:32
I think it’s because imperial measurements are more useful for day to day use, while metric is much better for technical use.

Well, I disagree. But that's because we only use the metric system around here, so I'm used to that. I only ever use inches for gaming and describing the size of my computer/tv screen.

katyusha77
27-02-2010, 12:43
I love warseer for that, from an innocent "who use inches for 40k?" we get to "why do we use inches or meters outside of 40k?", I can feel the smell of some "which system is better?" debate coming :D

Just to specify, we use the imperial system in France since the 3rd edition of 40k, the 2nd one (which was the 1st french ed.) used the metric system.

Anyway, I always found funny that my french 40k rulebook uses inches, when my english BFG rulebook uses centimeters :confused:. I always wondered why.

Codsticker
27-02-2010, 15:35
I'm not sure where this belongs but I am pretty sure not in the Rules forum. :p

Codsticker

The Warseer Mod Squad

Condottiere
27-02-2010, 16:18
My metric educated colleagues have no problems with using Imperial measurements.

N0-1_H3r3
27-02-2010, 16:40
Wrong Empire, old boy! Miles and inches are much older than any existing nation, we just refused to drop them when everyone else in Europe went metric.
Ah, but the Imperial measures were standardised in their current form by the British Empire in 1824 (though the US had become independent by then, so use slightly different standards for weight and volume), which is why they're called Imperial units; that they resemble and originate from more ancient ones used by the Roman Empire (for example) is coincidental.

Hena
01-03-2010, 10:26
In FInland the rules are in english and everyone uses inches. Real life uses metric for everything. I personally like metric more due to being rational (uses 10s for changing from one to another). When I was half a year in UK, I never could figure out what people weight as they kept on talking about stones :). Though I must admit that we should adopt Pint as a measure to be used in bars (and other suitable establishments) but nowhere else :D.


I feel Imperial measurements are "real-life" measurements. Ask me how tall 1.48 metres is and I'd have no idea, ask me how tall a 5ft 6in person is and I'd get it pretty close. The same is even with wargames, I can more easily guess 6 inches than 19cm, it just fits better in the picture in my head, I could always just convert, but why bother? And I'm from the age where they don't teach us imperial scales in schools (or maybe that just Wales for you)
That just makes no sense. So you're used to Imperials. I could almost say the same that I know what 150cm is and would struggle with 5ft 7in. Or 15cm vs 6 inch (though having played 40k causes this to be not a proble). I mean I could always convert but why bother :rolleyes:.

Only good thing that I've heard about imperial is the mile is about 1000 normal human steps. Now if that's correct I know that 1km is not workable that way. I give that to imperial. But cm and km is much better in scaling to real use with measurements and it's so much more easier to switch from one to another (how many feet in mile anyway ... 12 inch in feet).

Edit: Fixed the cm vs in numbers to make more sense.

Sideros Peltarion
01-03-2010, 11:31
Only good thing that I've heard about imperial is the mile is about 1000 normal human steps. Now if that's correct I know that 1km is not workable that way. I give that to imperial. But cm and km is much better in scaling to real use with measurements and it's so much more easier to switch from one to another (how many feet in mile anyway ... 12 inch in feet).

lol Not quite, unless your paces are 1.6m. That 1000 paces thing comes from the Roman mile (coming from the Latin for 1000) which was I believe 1000 paces IIRC.
:)

Hena
01-03-2010, 11:49
lol Not quite, unless your paces are 1.6m. That 1000 paces thing comes from the Roman mile (coming from the Latin for 1000) which was I believe 1000 paces IIRC.
:)
Ok, so it was half a mile or 2000 paces then probably (as 0.8m would make much more sense) :). Though just skipping this would mean that only good point of Imperial is fallen :D.

Condottiere
01-03-2010, 12:25
In FInland the rules are in english and everyone uses inches. Real life uses metric for everything. I personally like metric more due to being rational (uses 10s for changing from one to another). When I was half a year in UK, I never could figure out what people weight as they kept on talking about stones :). Though I must admit that we should adopt Pint as a measure to be used in bars (and other suitable establishments) but nowhere else :D.


That just makes no sense. So you're used to Imperials. I could almost say the same that I know what 150cm is and would struggle with 5ft 7in. Or 15cm vs 6 inch (though having played 40k causes this to be not a proble). I mean I could always convert but why bother :rolleyes:.

Only good thing that I've heard about imperial is the mile is about 1000 normal human steps. Now if that's correct I know that 1km is not workable that way. I give that to imperial. But cm and km is much better in scaling to real use with measurements and it's so much more easier to switch from one to another (how many feet in mile anyway ... 12 inch in feet).

Edit: Fixed the cm vs in numbers to make more sense.I learned metric first and thought it as a great deal more logical than Imperial measurements, so when precision is required I prefer using that.

However, I also had to do measurements by eye, and found that inches and feet suit my estimates a lot more closely than centimetres and metres (exact precision not being a requirement).

Askari
01-03-2010, 21:17
I learned metric first and thought it as a great deal more logical than Imperial measurements, so when precision is required I prefer using that.

However, I also had to do measurements by eye, and found that inches and feet suit my estimates a lot more closely than centimetres and metres (exact precision not being a requirement).

Exactly! I can't gauge centimetres by eye, it doesn't feel natural. An inch is about the size of the top half of my thumb, a foot is roughly the size of my foot, a yard is about a step. It makes sense. Precise measuring is of course different, as multiplying by 100 or 1000 is easier than feet to inches and etc.

And like I said, I was taught metric in school, and I still feel this way.

Huw_Dawson
01-03-2010, 23:08
you run the risk of being fined if you sell fruit and veg in pounds and ounces.

From Wikipedia:

There is no legislation outlawing the use of imperial units of measure on goods. All that is required is that the equivalent metric units also be displayed. Directive 80/181/EEC (as amended by Directive 89/617/EEC) units of measurement included in Chapter III of its Annex, including the imperial measure, could be used until 31 December 1999. This deadline was later extended. Following popular opposition to attempts to force people in Britain to use metric measurements European Commissioner Günter Verheugen stated on 11 September 2007 that not only were there no plans to oblige the United Kingdom to abandon the imperial measure, but also that European legislation would be enacted to guarantee the future use of the imperial unit.

:)

The problem with Imperial is the fact that the actual numbers you end up multiplying by get silly. A yard is 3 foot, a foot is 12 inches, but how many yards are there in a mile?

Of course, a mile is about how far you walk if you walk in a relatively straight line for about half an hour...

carlisimo
03-03-2010, 05:04
I learned to play in Spain, in cm. Back then 4in was a typical movement value, and that translates very well to 10cm (correspondingly, 12in is close to 30cm).

People in our grandparents' generation are familiar with inches and ounces, but I doubt those measurements were exactly the same as Imperial or US units (we call them English units in the US, but our gallon is different from the Imperial gallon, so I'm confused). The Spanish word for inch comes from the word for "thumb."

Young people don't use them.

pjklan
03-03-2010, 14:25
in italy we use (and have always used) inches for warhammer and 40k, even after 3rd edition, when we had translated books.

Pacorko
03-03-2010, 15:24
In Mexico the rules books can be obtained in both English and Spanish, and all of the Spanish books are in metric.

Yet, when we play game anywhere in the country, the majority of us use Imperial.

simonr1978
03-03-2010, 15:48
The problem with Imperial is the fact that the actual numbers you end up multiplying by get silly. A yard is 3 foot, a foot is 12 inches, but how many yards are there in a mile?

1760 ;). A mile is divided in 80 Chains of 22 yards each, it's still the way the overground railway is measured.

I've got to agree that I find Imperial more useful for most day to day purposes, and it's certainly not a case of it being what I'm used to. I was educated purely in metric and learned Imperial as teenager (Thanks to wargames), which has proved very useful as in adult life.


An inch is about the size of the top half of my thumb

Which is true for most adults and if my A-level English teacher was correct is the origin of the expression "Rule of Thumb".

N810
03-03-2010, 17:02
.... The problem with Imperial is the fact that the actual numbers you end up multiplying by get silly. A yard is 3 foot, a foot is 12 inches, but how many yards are there in a mile?

Of course, a mile is about how far you walk if you walk in a relatively straight line for about half an hour...

5280 feet, so just divide that by 3 to get 1760 yards. ;)

I find inperial units are very convenien then comparing distance to time.
since 12 is a multiple of 60.

Coasty
04-03-2010, 15:36
So, even *that* isn't part of the UK, is it? There was also an issue with Scottish banks not taking UK money, as I recall.
;)

Nah, we have lots of banks with a licence to print money, the English only have one, so our money confuses them. It's very funny.

MacVurrich
04-03-2010, 16:04
Imperial is easier to "cheat / guess" with
1 inch useually equals the measurement of the top of an adults mans thumb (joint to end of digit)
span between spread out thumb to little finger is appx 9/10inchs in most men

"remember this when opponents is placing their han on table before guessing ranges :)"



Nah, we have lots of banks with a licence to print money, the English only have one, so our money confuses them. It's very funny.

confuse the Scots as well
"All Scottish banks have the right to print their own notes. Three choose to do so: The Bank of Scotland (founded 1695), The Royal Bank of Scotland (founded 1727) and the Clydesdale Bank (owned by National Australia Bank). Only the Royal Bank prints pound notes. All the banks print 5,10,20 and 100 notes. Only the Bank of Scotland and Clydesdale Bank print 50 pound notes.

Scottish bank notes are not legal tender in Scotland. English bank notes of denomination less than 5UKP were legal tender in Scotland under Currency and Bank Notes Act 1954."

(legal tender is not the same as coin of the realam )

N810
04-03-2010, 16:13
Wait a minute....
If they are not legial tender, why do they bother to print them ???

MacVurrich
04-03-2010, 16:31
Scottish and Northern Irish bank notes are issued by retail banks rather than a national central bank, and as such are technically promissory notes rather than legal tender. Furthermore, Bank of England notes are legal tender only within England and Wales and therefore also have the legal status of promissory notes in Scotland and Northern Ireland. However, general agreement between banks within the United Kingdom is to treat all BoE notes as Legal tender

Legal tender or forced tender is an offered payment that, by law, cannot be refused in settlement of a debt, and have the debt remain in force. Currency is the most common form of legal tender

Thats why UK banks can refuse them

but I don't want to start going of on a tangent

Spacker
04-03-2010, 20:24
From Wikipedia:

There is no legislation outlawing the use of imperial units of measure on goods. All that is required is that the equivalent metric units also be displayed. Directive 80/181/EEC (as amended by Directive 89/617/EEC) units of measurement included in Chapter III of its Annex, including the imperial measure, could be used until 31 December 1999. This deadline was later extended. Following popular opposition to attempts to force people in Britain to use metric measurements European Commissioner Günter Verheugen stated on 11 September 2007 that not only were there no plans to oblige the United Kingdom to abandon the imperial measure, but also that European legislation would be enacted to guarantee the future use of the imperial unit.


Please don't quote Wikipedia, especially when you use it to contradict someone and what you quote doesn't actually contradict them :p

In practice so long as traders list prices for loose goods in both metric and imperial then under UK law they will normally be fine - but Lord Malice is right, if you sell fruit and veg only in imperial than you may well be prosecuted. There have already been prosecutions in the UK since the legislation came into effect in 2000. Note that nothing you quoted states that this is not the case.

e2055261
05-03-2010, 10:20
Australia - we use inches and we are a metric country :)

freddythebig
06-03-2010, 23:29
This reminds me of when I was doing my apprenticeship back in the 1970s and we first started getting drawings with metric dimensions on them.
All the guys I worked with would still be using imperial and would quote things like ' 3' 6 5/8" and a gnats b*ll*ck. I could see dimensions like this in my mind and it took me years to see metric measuremants the same way.
This has resulted in me using a mixture of systems to this day and amongst the guys from those years that I still, see we all still mix the two systems together in a manner that would probably seem strange to anyone growing up either side of those times.

Kaihlik
07-03-2010, 11:54
It should be noted that no bank notes are legal tender in Scotland as no English notes printed are considered legal tender and neither are Scottish notes. Since legal tender is actually a very narrow legal definition though it doesn't cause problems.

Kaihlik

09Project
08-03-2010, 01:12
Ah bank notes and the metric system.

On the topic, a lot of peeps here in the old UK still like to measure in miles and appreciate buying in lbs and oz's, measure in feet and inches and take there own weight measurements usings stone. And I am one of them, I understand that the metric system is handy, but it just doesn't mean much to me and I am used to the old ways. So GW using the old imperial measurements isn't really surprising.

On bank notes, as long as you are prepared to back up any printed currency with Bank of England notes banks in Scotland, Northern Ireland and a scattering of islands (Jersey, Isle of Man and a few further a field) can release there own money under liecence in their own countries.

The good old UK, we just like confusing people :D