PDA

View Full Version : Games Workshop: miniature company?



Pleasurepain
02-04-2007, 12:31
I wanted a chaos dragon ogre the other day. I've got three already, and needed the one variation that I don't have (who wants a unit all looking the same when there are alternative variations?). I popped into my local shop, and they didn't have any out. The chappie on duty (the manager) explained that he was the only one in all day, so he couldn't go out back and look for one as that would mean shutting the shop up. If I came back a few days later however, there would be a couple of staff on, so I should try that, because he knew there were a couple in stock out back.

He said he couldn't guarantee that he had the particular model though (fair enough). However, neither could he order it. He did suggest that I could order it as bits from mail order, which would cost £14.50 rather than £10 (if going to the shop, more if mail ordered directly). He could order me some more dragon ogres in, but they would be random variations. I asked why he couldn't just phone up and ask for a particular one, and he came up with some explanation about bit numbers and underpaid mail order pickers (which I don't think should bother me as a customer, their corporate procedures shouldn't be my problem!).

Anyway, Games Workshop keeps purporting to be focussing on the fact that they are a company that first and foremost sells miniatures. I want to buy a miniature from them. They can't sell it to me. Even the manager of one of their shops can't get that miniature for me! Does that sound like a miniature company to you?

To be fair, the chappie did offer to ring round the other shops in the locality (when the managers were in) to see if they could trade dragon ogres to get the particular one I want, but why on Earth should he be having to do that? He was obviously trying his best to help, but was completely hamstrung by a rigid ordering system.

Has anyone else had similar experiences? Is this really a sensible way to try to sell miniatures?

Crube
02-04-2007, 13:37
A while ago, you used to be able to mail order a complete model, but specify which one you wanted, for the same price...try giving MO a call and asking the question. If they can, then you can do the MO through the store.

Alternatively, if the store orders in a few Dragon Ogre blisters, then they should get a random selection, that includes some of each. If the manager is willing, then he could then hold the one you want.

Wooz
02-04-2007, 15:55
I'm in the US, so things may be a little different, but I've never had any problem ordering from the Mail Order department and requesting "Cool Mini Version #2" when there were variations. That's how I was able to make sure that I have all the different Chameleon Skinks and each of the Kroxigor minis.

JT-Y
02-04-2007, 22:42
Shockingly bad.

First, the manager should have asked you to wait outside whilst he locked up and went to look.
Go back and ask him, 'When you are alone, do you go without toilet breaks or lunch? Because you close for them, so why not for me? Or were you just feeling lazy?'.

Secondly, tell him you want that particular model, but don't see why you should pay over the top postage to get it. Tell him you understand that he can't order the specific model from warehousing, but he can from Direct, and that if he values customer service, he should order it from Direct and waive the postage.
If he won't, then customer service truly has gone the way of the Dodo, because that is what I would have done.

If he won't get for you the model you want, or can't even be bothered to look for it, ask for his regional's phone no' and complain to him.

Pleasurepain
02-04-2007, 23:19
To be fair, the chap in the shop was trying his best, it's the system that seems to be at fault.

I did make it clear to him what I thought of the situation and whether he could order the bits as you suggested. The thing it seems he couldn't even if he wanted. He could order random ogres, or he could order bits which he'd have to sell as bits (at twice the price I could pick up a random dragon ogre online). I told him I wouldn't even mind paying the £1 to order the particular figure to the shop (Even though the reason is that they stock such a low choice range. The shop never has more than four dragon ogres because of corporate policy, and as he put it "All the unpopular variations get left on the shelf because no-one wants them, and then we can't order any more because they don't sell."), but he physically wasn't able to do so. He could only order stock by product number, which is a random model or a bit.

Before I went into the shop, I went online and found I couldn't specify a particular model without paying extra for all of the separate bits. I was going to write a suggestion to them that they should have a system for specifying a particular variation, or even a "Comments" box on your order to leave this sort of information in. The only contact details under the feedback section are the "phone a monkey," an address to write to the designers (presumably so they can ignore your 'Kewl idea for the making the game mega') and some links to jobs/corporate pages and such. The only vaguely-useful looking bit is the "Report a problem with the site" (a bit of a stretch, but I suppose it could fit under that), which unfortunately is a dead link... oh the irony.

I think if I still want this model, I'll order a random blister online from one of the discounted places, and then if it isn't the one I want, order the body bit alone from GW. It'll be cheaper than ordering all the bits separately from GW in the first place.

It just seems that they have set up their system in a way that means they can't actually deliver the miniatures that people want!

Lord Malek The Red Knight
02-04-2007, 23:27
i had a similar problem a few years back when i went in to buy D-Cannon Support Weapons for my wife's Eldar army. they only had the Shadowweaver and Vibrocannon models in stock (same model, different gun in the blister), so i asked about ordering them. i was told i could specify the weapon i wanted when i ordered, so i added them to the order i was making instore.
turned out i would have to pay the bits rate to specify the weapon (to buy all the bits together it worked out an extra £1 per gun). i complained about this to the manager (as i was only ordering them anyway because they didnt have the full selection in stock, and he told me i could get them this way) and he waived the extra charge (i.e. took £3 off my order to cover the cost of choosing specific bits for the 3 models). :)
maybe your manager could do the same (for the same reasons)?

~ Tim

Crazy Harborc
03-04-2007, 01:01
Soooo...it costs extra money to have a warehouse employee pay atttention to what they take out of the bins???? Then, how is it they can find it when it's ordered as a bitz order?? Kinda sounds like penny anti extortion. Pay extra to get what YOU want to buy!!

Hey guys.......this paying customer wants to actually select a specific model for his money:eek: Well, we'll show him!!!:evilgrin:

Drummerboy
03-04-2007, 02:25
ok, so it would sound from your experience that GW's system is designed around inflexibility? Here is how is works. You call an order through to the guys in Mail Order. They place an order onto our Sage ordering system, whereupon the pickers, in another part of the building, take it off the computer system, and pick it. The only things they have are product codes (i.e- 99060101090, or whatever it might be...), and so they pick them from those codes. All three Dragon Ogres are packaged in the same blister pack, so have the same code.

But why don't they have seperate codes? Becasue GW has around 45,000 models in it's total ranges, and there is limited space in our picking floor. If every unit type, ie Dragon Ogres, took up 3 spaces rather than the one they do, it would need three times the space, which we don't have. (make sense?). This is precisely the same as orders being picked to be sent out as part of the weekly store order.

It's worth asking the chap in Mail order to get a specific model- perhaps he can ring the picking floor and get it sorted, but try to understand- the pickers pick probably about 1000 orders a day between them, so trying to organise that sort of thing is time consuming.

The best bet is to ask the manager to order a couple of boxes of blisters in to the store, which will almost certainly contain the Dragon Ogre you're after, or appeal to his better nature to let you order the components at a slightly lower price (I'm always doing that for customers in my store!).

Hope that cleared it up -we did not design our ordering sytem around a small table, cackling in the candlelight, thinking of more and more devious ways to make things difficult for customers, it's just that we have to have a practical, and profitable system for mail orders. I hope this has dispelled any myths for you!

Crazy Harborc
03-04-2007, 03:10
Drummerboy....thanks for the information. Now, I do know more about the method(s) GW uses. I had assumed GW was more of a high tech operation, what with the computers and all that.

By the by, 45,000 items in an inventory /stock list is not a big deal with the kinds of programs out there in todays era of computers. Bin space may be a problem, but printouts can be made to show special requests on them.

In the mean time.....based on what you wrote, those pickers have their hands full making do with a system that doesn't read like a very good one.

Pleasurepain
03-04-2007, 03:21
Oh, I understand why it's done, and I never supposed that the system was set-up to be deliberately awkward, just that not enough had been done in terms of system design to foresee or remove that awkwardness.

The system is, as you point out set-up for efficiency of operation and I appreciate that you have to have a balance between that and quality of service to run any operation successfully. My concern is that it the current balance hinders the very core goal of the company: providing miniatures to people who want to buy them. I realise why you don't have copies of every variation of every miniature in your shops, although that would be the ideal situation in terms of fulfilling that goal. What seems extraordinary though is that you cannot get a model if it isn't in stock. Not that you might have to wait a bit for the manager to order it for you, not that you might have to phone someone up to see if they have one they could send, no there simply is no way through the system to get your hands on the miniature, which supposedly the company is interested in selling to you.

Basically, the system can be as efficient as you like, a machine oiled to perfection, but if it isn't doing what it's supposed to be doing, you've built the wrong machine!

As a suggestion, and not being a computer nerd so not really knowing how easy this would be to implement:

As a simple fix to at least enable people to get things that aren't carried in the shop, can you not "tag" components that make up models, so that when ordering a model in component form, the fact that it is a whole model is recognised and the model price charged rather than the cumulative bit price. Likewise ordering three particular individual troopers would flag as the price for the blister of three troopers. It's not the most elegant fix, but it would enable people to actually get what they're after. The system wouldn't have to be changed and the pickers could carry on picking as normal.

(I am sorry if it comes across that I'm saying the way you do things isn't great, but the "computer says no" attitude really aggravates me. If company procedures make something difficult, it is not something that should affect me as a customer. Put bluntly, a company's own poor operating practice is not an excuse, it's a failure!)

Crazy Harborc
03-04-2007, 03:31
I had to come back. I just have to make a comment based on what we expearienced long ago dealing with a much smaller GW. We tried to order specific minies for a customer as part of a (then) large order. Couldn't be done, too much trouble, too complicated to grab a specific minie/model. etc, etc.

revford
03-04-2007, 05:30
I had exactly the same thing trying to get this Imperial Priest chap:

http://uk.games-workshop.com/storefront/store.uk?do=Individual&code=9947010802201&orignav=10

I wanted to buy it in store not just because I was trying to avoid the postage and extra bits order costs but because getting out of the house and to a busy shopping centre was part of my therapy.

The store guys just kept on ordering boxes week after week until one turned up with the model I wanted. Each box they ordered contained only two models from a random selection of three or more, so they ended up with a whole stack of spare stock.

Dafter than my fun was a mate who wanted to buy a squad of Ogryns. Codex standard squad is five but the store only keeps four in stock. :)

Zzarchov
03-04-2007, 11:47
The Ideal way I'd solve that (low tech, being a software engineer the IDEAL way for me would be to sell them software I write for them) would be just have a second code one the model showing its variation number.

Have most orders just show the "model code" which could be any variation, but allow orders to specify both Model number and variant number so that if a store does truly want one specific miniature it can be done (though time consuming) without the other added cost on both ends of phoning up and trying to ask for a specific variant.

I mean, there have been many, many times when I haven't bought something just because the variant I am specifically looking for isn't in (and its a pain to get a new one)

Bombot
03-04-2007, 12:08
Hope that cleared it up -we did not design our ordering sytem around a small table, cackling in the candlelight, thinking of more and more devious ways to make things difficult for customers, it's just that we have to have a practical, and profitable system for mail orders. I hope this has dispelled any myths for you!

I see. So you used to be able to order the specific model you wanted. Now you offer a lucky dip and charge extra for same the system you had before.

If that isn’t “more devious ways to make things difficult for customers” then please explain what it is.

Tyron
03-04-2007, 13:50
Agreed!stupid GW

Jedi152
03-04-2007, 13:57
I don't mind having to pay a bit extra to get the exact mini's i want ... and lets face it, who doesn't root through the blisters on the shelf anyway?

Luckily, if they don't have it on the shelf at my local store, i just hand over an order form and wait 15 mins...

@Drummerboy, purely out of interest, how does the pricing work? I was charged £5.99 for a mini listed as £5 on the online store last time i went in - there was a massive queue and i didn't have time to argue. Do they have an updated price list downstairs?

Tyron
03-04-2007, 14:05
Yeah the catalogues they use instore, the prices are out of date.

violenceha
03-04-2007, 14:15
Try living in australia, the bloody online store doesn't stock half of what you want!

JT-Y
03-04-2007, 17:16
Yeah the catalogues they use instore, the prices are out of date.

You really have to love that.
So often it's true, as the Collectors guides, sold for £5 or £6, are often out of date, but still on sale, and instore catalogues aren't always updated by the staff when the momo's come around, because the buggers are lazy, period.

See, in the UK, if you enter a GW and use those catalogues to place an order, the price listed in the catalogue used is the price they have to charge.
If they attempt to charge more once the order is placed, due to the prices in the catalogue being out of date, then they are breaking the law.

It really is that simple.


@Drummerboy, most models were individualy coded as full kits a few years back, and all components were avaliable. I also remember the promise that old ranges would never be made obsolete and would remain avaliable through Direct.

But, that being the case or not, the solution is simple: order the kit the customer wants from Direct and only charge the blister cost, this way the customer gets what they want and feels good and GW loses absolutely nothing, apart from the extra it would charge for the simple action of ordering from Direct.

Its the customer service aspect thats gone. Far better to make money on postage, which you and I both know is overpriced in the extreme.
How about cutting postage costs by charging staffers postage too?
Thats right, it's the customers who pay the staffers postage costs guys, they get it free.
Naughty.

Please don't blow smoke. Not everyone 'doesn't know better'.

Bombot
03-04-2007, 17:23
See, in the UK, if you enter a GW and use those catalogues to place an order, the price listed in the catalogue used is the price they have to charge.
If they attempt to charge more once the order is placed, due to the prices in the catalogue being out of date, then they are breaking the law.

It really is that simple.


No it isn't.

They do not have to charge the prices listed in the catalogue. The notion that they do is the one of the more regularly touted pieces of misinformation that exists today.

Jedi152
03-04-2007, 17:25
Its the customer service aspect thats gone. Far better to make money on postage, which you and I both know is overpriced in the extreme.
How about cutting postage costs by charging staffers postage too?
Thats right, it's the customers who pay the staffers postage costs guys, they get it free.
Naughty.
And presumably then can just amble down and pick whatever components they want. Staff get such a massive discount that if the customers found out how much GW could afford to sell them for, they'd probably have a riot on their hands...

Zzarchov
03-04-2007, 18:52
No it isn't.

They do not have to charge the prices listed in the catalogue. The notion that they do is the one of the more regularly touted pieces of misinformation that exists today.

Actually he is correct, you are missing one phrase in his post "once the order is placed". If you just bring up an old catalogue they will say "this is out of date" and be well within their right to do so.

Once you enter into a contract (Even non-secure) to purchase an Item at a price AND THEY AGREE they can't then force you to pay another, higher price.

Paulus
03-04-2007, 19:52
Staff get such a massive discount that if the customers found out how much GW could afford to sell them for, they'd probably have a riot on their hands...

True, I've only become so concerned with prices since I've found out what my mate pays. :(

JT-Y
03-04-2007, 20:30
And presumably then can just amble down and pick whatever components they want. Staff get such a massive discount that if the customers found out how much GW could afford to sell them for, they'd probably have a riot on their hands...

Once upon a time they could wander onto the picking floor when visiting HQ, but that was stopped a few years ago, for security reasons (heh).

But yes, staff can order anything they like by weight of material only and have it delivered to the store free of charge, no min or max order size (the exception is one frame plastic boxes, marine commander, bikes etc, or Specialist ranges which don't have component codes, like WM, BFG and Epic, which they only get a 50% discount on).

I remember a guy I worked with placing an order and asking the guy on the phone to tell him when he'd reached 48p, yes forty eight pence, because he couldn't be bothered going to the cash point.
For that amount he got one page of small components, the ones that cost about £1 or £2 to customers, =I= icons, arms, weapons, stuff like that, to complete the conversions in his SOB army.

I once ordered 3 Land Raiders by component code, a load of Iron Warrior stuff and about 20 Chaos Terminators, for just under £20.

Trust me, letting a customer order the model he wants from Direct and only charging him the blister cost won't cause the company to fold, but it will cause a happy customer.


And Bombot, I am right, the listed price in the catalogues used instore is the price that is displayed to customers at point of sale.
If that is wrong or out of date, not the customers problem, it is the task of the retailer to keep its pricing up to date and thus remain legal.
The customer is entitled to purchase at the listed price. Retailers get in trouble on a daily basis for neglecting that.

Further, and Zzarchov is correct, once the order is placed, well, can't up the price then, and most customers when filling out a Direct form go of the prices given in either the catalogue or the collectors guide that they are getting the codes from, because that is the point of sale for those items, and only realise those are wrong when they get told the price after ordering.
Thats bloody bad, and a result of laziness/apathy.


Ooooh, that looks like a rant. Sorry, it wasn't meant to be :D

Drummerboy
04-04-2007, 02:44
@ JT- Y

First of all, man- you've got to stop making crass generalisations that are going to seriously irritate people and undermine your credibility. First of all, you call us "Lazy: Period". Now, this aggrevates me, because I work in the Warhammer World Store, and work my ass of daily. On Sunday, we had 500 customers in store for a Forgeworld open Day. 5 staff- we worked our asses off. Last Wednesday, 135 kids for the school leagues final - 2 staff- we worked our asses off. Grand Tournaments - up to 200 gamers - no more than 5 staff- we always work our asses off. I work my ass off every day at Warhammer World to make sure customers are sorted and happy- it's what I believe in, and try my best to do. So am I lazy because I havn't re-arranged all the catalogues with curent prices? No. So why did you say I am? I take that very personally.

You then start to preach Trade description act law, which is true. If you display a price, then it should be sold at that price. I fully agree with that, having been a GW customer myself in the past. We do that every day- one of my regular gamers wanted to buy 20 Gryphon Legion standards on Saturday- catalogue sas they are £1 each. When they come up, invoice says £2 each. I bin the invoice and charge him the £1. Because we really, really care about customer service!! But to be fair, all of our catalogues say quite clearly, that all prices are subject to change, so legally, we can charge whatever we like for the products, but choose not to.

You're right. All of our models were individually priced "a few years back". Do you know how many models/ sprues GW have produced in "a few years"? Hundreds, nay even thousands. GW can't keep the same level of organisation if it's going to produce new models, and we all like new models, so there has to be some give somewhere. Surely you can understand that?

So, with all this, are you convinced that the "customer service aspect has gone", or are you simply generalising again, because you were irritated about a personal experience? Are you going to tell me, that after a hard days work, running around like a madman, making sure everyone is happy, that my "customer service aspect has gone"? Or are you convinced GW as a whole doesn't care about it's customers, when they are involved in a niche market? I'm intrigued.

It would appear you have a major grudge against GW, for having a system you don't agree with. We can't please every body all the time, but we try our damned hardest.

And as for ordering on weight, that privaledge has been stripped of us now, because staff orders were taking the picker's time away from picking customer orders. So, once again, staff endure grief for you happiness. And that is the way it should be.

We're on the same side, man- plase don't insult staff for no reason, or rant about a system you don't know everything about- it just irritates people and creates a negative atmosphere- something our hobby can do well without.

Cheers
Nick

VetSgtNamaan
04-04-2007, 03:19
Well it seems like in the UK the games workshop stores are quite busy. I honestly think that it is like it is a whole another atmosphere in the UK towards the hobby than perhaps in North America. While of course I can only speak for my small segment of the gaming comunity in my town it would seem GW is none to popular as far as it goes to customer service though of course we all do play thier games.

And while I have no intention to turn this into a hateful thread I always wonder just like Wal mart losing thier shirt in germany is the GW style of marketing/store model failing in the US(So I have heard anyway, I have never even been in a GW store and it is unlikely I ever will.) because of a cultural difference. I can say all my friends would jump at the chance to get things cheaper regardless of wear we buy it since by having formed a local clubw ith weekly gaming nights we are drawing in people and helping the indie store make money form the new players coming to check things out.


I know the store owner does not like people buying things elsewhere but we are playing in the store as a favour to him mostly since we used to play in each others houses. It was much easier to get to than now when we have to deal with parking downtown and the like but it is a much easier cleanup after words. I mean I know the online retailers are the brunt of alot of peoples criticism but people selling thier armies no one seems to mind. Honestly I think the cheaper people can get thier armies the more likely people are actually going to play the hobby and not just buy a box or two and realise just how much it is going to cost them to get the army they want and go do something else that they can afford.


Speaking of disorganization one of the things I recently bought was the classic range catalogue which I did have to pay for, certainly a gw only thing since all other companies are happy to give you thiers for free but having spent 40+ dollars canadian on it I findout that most of it is inaccurate or unavailible. Rather annoying when I wanted to buyall these classic range heavy weapons blisters but oh no you can not do that but we can sell you the parts for double though. SO that was very annoying and honestly I have to say I feel very sorry for anyone who works for GW I know the workers in the stores are often brunt of alot of anger that should be directed towards the company itself.

Gandhi
04-04-2007, 03:43
The Ideal way I'd solve that (low tech, being a software engineer the IDEAL way for me would be to sell them software I write for them) would be just have a second code one the model showing its variation number.

Have most orders just show the "model code" which could be any variation, but allow orders to specify both Model number and variant number so that if a store does truly want one specific miniature it can be done (though time consuming) without the other added cost on both ends of phoning up and trying to ask for a specific variant.

I mean, there have been many, many times when I haven't bought something just because the variant I am specifically looking for isn't in (and its a pain to get a new one)

I can tell you from experience that most warehous employees won't care enough to do more than glance over the massive stock they have, and then just send the next closest thing instead. It happens all the time where I work "They ordered single but we only have double? Alright, send it anyways, if it comes back oh well".

That's how the warehouse I work at functions anyways.

Pleasurepain
04-04-2007, 03:56
I wouldn't take it personally, Nick matey.

I don't think (as far as I see it anyway) that the concerns raised here of any possible failings are failings of individual staff members, but rather organisational failings. It is perfectly possible to have a "lazy" company, for example, where all the staff work themselves into the ground for the customers: the company can be lazy for not employing enough staff to properly meet the demand, so that while all the staff individually do their best, the customers feel let down, because one staff member can only do so much. Or that individual staff members try to work out the best way around some systemic problem which is getting in the way of fulfilling the customer's needs (I bet you had to do some jiggery pokery with the till for those Gryphon Legion standards, rather than putting it through as a normal transaction?): the company can still be lazy for not having ironed out that system flaw and putting the individual staff member in that position. So I wouldn't take it as a personal slight.

In this case, if GW is being lazy it is in not having sought out a solution (if the problem has come up before which I presume it must have done) to the problem of customers being unable to get the particular models they require. Obviously you are limited by the way you currently do things. Looking at it (as a company) as "We can't do X because of Y" is a bit lazy though I'm afraid (although incredibly common human behaviour in my experience). "We have problem Y, now how do we get around that to solve X" would be much better. Now I don't know how your ordering works, but my suggestion was that maybe you could get around the bit-by-code picking by flagging complete models at the checkout (like how the till at Tesco says "Pizza £2" "Pizza £2" *flag BOGOF* "Pizza BOGOF -£2" but instead have "D. Ogre body £5" "D. Ogre claw £1.25" "D. Ogre torso £3" "D. Ogre arm £2" "D. Ogre leg £2" *flag complete D. Ogre* "complete D. Ogre -£3.25"). Now, that would be great and would sort online shopping too, but I have no idea how easy it would be to implement. A more low-tech way might be to send out a memo to all shops saying "If customers want a particular model, just order the bit parts individually but only charge the whole model/blister/box price. Just note it on form X so we can keep track of stock." Some managers may do this already, but make it official policy. Advertise the service at the till too. There are probably a million other better ways, but I'm just one man with no knowledge of GW practices! There are always ways around problems, it is just whether a company can be bothered to find/implement a solution or not. But if the company decides not to, it shouldn't be suprising if potential customers get narked by it!

The expansion of the company will obviously affect negatively the agility of it, big organisations (whether a more varied stock room, or the company as a whole) naturally tend to become more cumbersome. What really needs to happen is that lines of communication are kept open as problems with the system becomes more detached from the people who implement it. Does GW have a good line of communication for staff to highlight problems or suggest improvements for "operational bumps" that they come across? I would hope that is the case for any company. (If it does, maybe you could highlight this! :) )

Bombot
04-04-2007, 10:01
And Bombot, I am right, the listed price in the catalogues used instore is the price that is displayed to customers at point of sale.
If that is wrong or out of date, not the customers problem, it is the task of the retailer to keep its pricing up to date and thus remain legal.
The customer is entitled to purchase at the listed price.

Ok, depends exactly what you mean there. Do they have to sell the item at the listed price? No - the price is, in legal jargon, an "invitation to treat", not an offer to enter into a contract.

Can they charge you more once they've taken you money? No way - and I didn't mean to intimate they could (vagueness on my part may have indicated otherwise).

Can they raise the prices from those listed in the catalogue before selling you the goods? Dodgy this one - they might be running foul of the Consumer Protection Act. GW may well have some legal blurb at the bottom of a catalogue page saying "prices are subject to change" or somesuch.

Is it "really that simple" - no!

Huw_Dawson
04-04-2007, 10:41
Think about it - GW has millions and millions of tiny bits of metal in their store warehouse. Could you imagine the following conversation?

Boss: Timmy! Go find all the bits for this specific Dragon Ogre, right?
Timmy: Boss, their are THOUSANDS of bits of Dragon Ogre out there!
Boss: So some of them must be the right kind!
Timmy: *Grumbles and walks off*

Now, considering that GW are very keen on computerising their stuff, yes, they probably would like a better system. But that costs money, and money means that more models need to be sold, so more need to be produced... ever heard the phrase "To make money you have to have money"? The scenario above would probably lead to Timmy becoming dissented, and as this happened every day, he'd quit. So someone new has to be brought in, trained, and such. GW then spends more money. And has a worse employee turnover rate.

You can see my position here - I feel that GW's customer service is great, and yes, it needs tweaking a little at the edges, but that's only because GW is so big. When a company gets to that size, it's hard to move quickly on anything.

So I can safely say that we're not going to get a position change from GW any time soon.

So we need solutions. Your LFGS seemed to be being a little unfriendly. Is it possible that they've annoyed GW somehow - that always makes a store have problems with stock. So here, find another LFGS.

Another solution? eBay. Go their, find the model, buy it, wait for it to come, use it. Easy as pie.

Finally, you could just wait for another Ogre to come into stock, or just convert another ogre to look different. That's probably the best solution of all. ;)

- Huw

JT-Y
04-04-2007, 13:05
Drummerboy,

Firstly, if I irritate anyone who works in GW retail, I can't really say I'm hugely concerned. And thats because, whilst I may appear to critisise them, I'm not, its the company itself I have problems with and the staffers who get stuck with it. Should any of what I say ring true for any particular staff member, well, too bad, you and I both know what the job entails...
If stating that the company adopts a lazy attitude to things that matters cuts too close, it's supposesed too.

Pleasurepain has read it right, I'm not knocking you personally, as I don't know you. But I will knock the company you work for, because it is people like yourself who suffer when all is said and done.

Now, your example over the standards shows good service, but the original post, in which the store manager made excuses shows the opposite, in my oppinion.
Also, I didn't say that every staffer would charge the £20 (in your example), but I know of those who would/have and some seniors who would suspend you for what you did. Think on that and be grateful that your regional is a good person.

Don't ever assume I dislike GW, I genuinely don't. Because of that I do get righteously indignant over some policies which affect both staff and customers. More so when certain policies aren't standardised across the chain, get me?

Anyway, I'm hugely in danger of going off on one, so I'll not. Please PM me if you want to talk more, as you say, we are both on the same side afterall.

The Ape
04-04-2007, 13:28
JT-Y - some GW staff ARE lazy. But the staff at Warhammer World cant afford to be lazy as it's just too damn busy!!! (Having worked there (admittedly key-time) and at a number of smaller stores, I know the difference in work-rate required.) (and now I feel dirty for sticking up for Drummerboy)

Don't blame the shop floor dudes-blame the policy-making management.

chromedog
04-04-2007, 14:00
I've worked in warehousing (50-60,000 product lines) and I know it's hard and busy work a lot of the time, and some stock will come in variations but keep the same sku (stock control #). I'm not calling any of the GW warehouse monkeys lazy :-)

We did have (several times a day) customers order part#xxxx, but "only the yellow ones". Part #xxxx came shipped to us as a mixed set of 7 colours. I was the monkey who had to go and sort through the sets to make up the order out of the existing sets, then put the remaining 6-piece sets back into sets of 7 ('random') colours. So I know what Direct pickers would have to do to get that exact piece.

When any of the gamers I know wants a piece and it's one with different variants (=I= for 40k) and the only one that the store had was not the one they wanted, they tried other stores - granted, this isn't always possible. Sydney has a lot of GW stores - and then the independents - If they still couldn't get it, they would ask around first. Did anyone else have xx arm for this model and did they want to swap/sell the part.
Then they went to mail order.
Me, if it isn't the exact model I'm after, I'll change it to make it more like the one I couldn't get. Not the same, but then, I'll have a piece that no-one else does.

I'm betting the warehouse doesn't have an legion of flying monkeys to pick their stock. Best with what they've got, that's all I ask.

Lord Malek The Red Knight
04-04-2007, 18:53
wouldnt a simple fix be to add an extra number to the end of the product code, to show which version of the model is required? eg:

99060201005 = any random Dragon Ogre (picked from the bin marked "99060201005")
99060201005(1) = Dragon Ogre 1 (and pickers would be able to tell which blister contains "Dragon Ogre 1" because it would have the "99060201005(1)" part code, stored within the bin marked "99060201005")

no extra floor space needed, just an extra row of digits on the computer database/labels.

now of course this isnt going to be free to GW, but its got to be cheaper than building a bigger warehouse. :p

~ Tim