PDA

View Full Version : Games Workshop Company History



Inquisitor S.
04-04-2007, 23:13
Hi everybody, I hope this is the correct forum for this.

So, can anybody tell me or point me a direction where to find the history/ the development of Games Workshop as a company?

I mean there is (or has been) Citadel Miniatures, Games Workshop, Iron Claw, Marauder, Armorcast, Forgeworld etc. How did they interact or are they the same under different names or what? Thx in advance.

Bookwrak
04-04-2007, 23:18
Hi everybody, I hope this is the correct forum for this.

So, can anybody tell me or point me a direction where to find the history/ the development of Games Workshop as a company?

I mean there is (or has been) Citadel Miniatures, Games Workshop, Iron Claw, Marauder, Armorcast, Forgeworld etc. How did they interact or are they the same under different names or what? Thx in advance.

Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Games_Workshop)is always a good place to start.

Mikhaila
06-04-2007, 00:22
Hi everybody, I hope this is the correct forum for this.

So, can anybody tell me or point me a direction where to find the history/ the development of Games Workshop as a company?

I mean there is (or has been) Citadel Miniatures, Games Workshop, Iron Claw, Marauder, Armorcast, Forgeworld etc. How did they interact or are they the same under different names or what? Thx in advance.

Armorcast wasn't part of GW, they just paid a fee to be able to do 40k scale models of some epic pieces.

Forgeworld is run by some GW company veterans, and is a wholly owned subsidiary, but runs pretty independent from the other parts.

(I think) Marauder was started by ex GW sculpters but then brought into the citadel line?

(Guessing) Ironclaw was never part of GW, but had sculpts by an ex GW sculpter. Bob Olley?

Citadel Miniatures was originally a miniature company. Games Workshop was a games store. An unholy fusion occurred.

scarletsquig
06-04-2007, 08:37
I'm interested in the really early history myself... with Steve Jackson etc. getting it set up.

That guy has done a hell of a lot with his life... range of 50+ bestselling fighting fantasy books, founded world's most successful wargaming company. *fanbois*

... yeah, I also like John Blanche, too :P

I read a ton of those books as a kid, and kept seeing blurbs about Games Workshop in the backs of some of them without really knowing what it was :D

Ravenous
06-04-2007, 09:12
Isnt Steve Jackson the same guy who does Muchkin, Dork Tower and the short lived but awesome game FRAG?

richred_uk
06-04-2007, 09:19
No, there are 2 Steve Jackson's in the "hobby-gaming" industry.

Steve Jackson (US) runs Steve Jackson Games who produce many great games - the criminally under-rated Illuminati and Cars Wars most noteably.

Steve Jackson (UK) co-founded GW with Ian Livingstone (and IIRC a 3rd guy who left when they moved into fantasy games rather than hand-crafted chess sets etc). He wrote/ designed the Fighting Fantasy books, and I believe is now head (ish) honcho at Eidos.

snurl
06-04-2007, 09:35
Check out White Dwarf #300 for a lot of company history stuff.

OrlyggJafnakol
06-04-2007, 10:16
You can also buy the 10th anniversary issue of WD on eBay. Issue 90.

generulpoleaxe
06-04-2007, 16:16
ally and trish morrison started marauder miniatures.
they were sold through gw's stores and were more popular than the citadel miniatures in a lot of cases.
they then started working with gw again (i don't know the real reasons, tho gw probably bought marauder from them)

RobC
06-04-2007, 17:27
This article (http://www.eidosinteractive.co.uk/ian_livingstone/biography/part1.html) gives you some good background on the early history of Games Workshop.

Just for the record, while Steve and Ian had their names on the front covers of the Fighting Fantasy gamebooks, they only wrote the initial run and a few specials. This year is also the 25th anniversary of the first release of The Warlock of Firetop Mountain...

scarletsquig
06-04-2007, 17:57
This article (http://www.eidosinteractive.co.uk/ian_livingstone/biography/part1.html) gives you some good background on the early history of Games Workshop.

Wow, thankyou!

That's just the kind of depth I was looking for, really interesting to read :)

Always cool to hear actual stories of raw ambition resulting in something amazing.

The progression from "creating and selling handmade backgammon in bedroom" to "scraping up enough cash to buy 6 copies of some newfangled thing called "D&D" to "Pissing off the landlord by running a small bedroom business and ending up homeless" to "buying a small office and sleeping in a van while using squash court showers" to "opening the first GW store" was pretty incredible :D

Grimshawl
07-04-2007, 21:04
Wow, thankyou!

That's just the kind of depth I was looking for, really interesting to read :)

Always cool to hear actual stories of raw ambition resulting in something amazing.

The progression from "creating and selling handmade backgammon in bedroom" to "scraping up enough cash to buy 6 copies of some newfangled thing called "D&D" to "Pissing off the landlord by running a small bedroom business and ending up homeless" to "buying a small office and sleeping in a van while using squash court showers" to "opening the first GW store" was pretty incredible :D

A wise man might point out that all their [GW's] success came from being run by gamers attuned to the gaming world who stayed in touch with gamers, instead of where GW is today.

blongbling
08-04-2007, 13:38
marauder wasnt a seperate company, it was a tax dodge by bryan ansell...the company was still owned by GW so the sculptors never actually left or rejoined GW

spikyjames
08-04-2007, 14:17
This article (http://www.eidosinteractive.co.uk/ian_livingstone/biography/part1.html) gives you some good background on the early history of Games Workshop.

Just for the record, while Steve and Ian had their names on the front covers of the Fighting Fantasy gamebooks, they only wrote the initial run and a few specials. This year is also the 25th anniversary of the first release of The Warlock of Firetop Mountain...

that was a pretty good read, thanks for sharing it. it's good to know where it all started.

james

Inquisitor S.
11-04-2007, 20:18
Thank you very much for every bit illuminating this quite complex matter folks :)

Brandir
12-04-2007, 21:57
Ian Livingstone bought a boat, called it 'Games Workshop' and sailed around the world for a year after pocketing 30 million in the Tom Kirby buyout of 1991. Steve Jackson also received 30 million for his part of GW).

He then was heavily involved in the creation of Lara Croft and Eidos. Although he still has an interest in that IP and company, Mr Livingstone's latest project was a book called How Big Is Your Brain

http://www.amazon.co.uk/How-Big-Your-Brain-Livingstone/dp/1840468033/ref=sr_1_1/203-7296728-9217554?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1176410682&sr=1-1

Steve Jackson recently reappeared when the Fighting Fantasy books were relaunched.

From Amazon: Steve Jackson and Ian Livingstone are the creators of the Fighting Fantasy series which has sold many millions of books throughout the world. They also founded the Games Workshop chain and have since risen to prominent positions in the British computer games industry, at Lionhead and Eidos respectively. Ian Livingstone was recently made an OBE.

blongbling
13-04-2007, 09:26
[QUOTE=Brandir;1465098]Ian Livingstone bought a boat, called it 'Games Workshop' and sailed around the world for a year after pocketing 30 million in the Tom Kirby buyout of 1991. Steve Jackson also received 30 million for his part of GW).

QUOTE]

not sure on this as that would have meant that GW was valued at a minimum of 60-70m in 1995.....when the value of the company would have been far less than that (though i cannot find any share price data for that year of float so i am guessing based on sales revenue).

Brandir
13-04-2007, 12:32
Tom Kirby lead a 60 million management buyout of GW in 1991.

The company was floated on the LSE for 115p a share, valuing the company then at about 80 million.

ExquisiteEvil
13-04-2007, 17:25
Man, I would love for GWs share price to fall into the state where Jackson and Livingstone could buy it back - taking off the stock market and giving it the by gamers for gamers attitude GW is so sorely missing right now....

Brandir
13-04-2007, 18:03
To fall to the 60 million price the shares in GW would have to half to 150p or so!

blongbling
13-04-2007, 19:08
wouldnt that mean that the buyout was for 70m shares then at 1.15 for the company to be valued at 80m. that would mean that in order for messers Livingstone and Jackson it would need to fall back to that same rate to buy it back.........unless my understanding of valuing a company is incorrect.

Besides, lets remember that they had the company befroe most people in this board were even into gaming so how can you remember what their attitiude was like....GW was a tiny company back then that only started to become big after the Mgt buy out of the company from Brian Ansell

Vic
13-04-2007, 19:09
They fell there not too long ago, no one rushed in to buy it though :(

Brandir
13-04-2007, 19:33
GW had more shares in the early days; in recent years the company has bought some back, reducing the number of shares in circulation.

This was just designed to confuse posters on threads like this!

blongbling
13-04-2007, 19:36
i know...was testing you :P wanted to see if you actually read the annual report that comes out to see the GW buy backs they have done...makes it difficult to anticipate what the actual buy price would be......especially considering that msot of the GW main share holders are long term partners and arent there for a quick buy and sell buck

nap1st
14-04-2007, 09:28
Ian Livingstone bought a boat, called it 'Games Workshop' and sailed around the world for a year after pocketing 30 million in the Tom Kirby buyout of 1991. Steve Jackson also received 30 million for his part of GW).

He then was heavily involved in the creation of Lara Croft and Eidos. Although he still has an interest in that IP and company, Mr Livingstone's latest project was a book called How Big Is Your Brain.

If I remember some time in the 90's, Ian Livingstone also did a game about high elven politics for GW. Any one remember what it was called?

richred_uk
14-04-2007, 10:47
aprospo of nothing (no idea how to spell that lol) one of GW'd Directors, Alan Stewart, just sold 750,000 shares at 3.50 per share

As a rough rule of thumb directors selling takes the share price down and directors buying takes it up, but recently most of the directors dealing I have noticed have been buys, so I wouldn't read anything into it except Mr Stewart fancied a nice boat or something lol

OrlyggJafnakol
14-04-2007, 10:56
I agree with ExquisiteEvil, but alas, that is just not going to happen. Forge World is the best bet for the future IMHO... They produce great models, fun, experimental rules and lovely big hardback rule books just like the GW of old. Yeah it is expensive, but you cannot doubt the quality.

RobC
14-04-2007, 14:13
If I remember some time in the 90's, Ian Livingstone also did a game about high elven politics for GW. Any one remember what it was called?

It was called Dragon Masters. The BoardGameGeek entry for it can be found here (http://www.boardgamegeek.com/game/37).