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View Full Version : Lord of The Rings n00b. Game query



HughbertofKhorne
18-04-2007, 19:14
alright chaps and chapesses.

Ive been a lover of the Lord of the rings models since their first release, the line holding some of the best miniatures games workshop has ever done (in my opinion)

so, now ive finished yet another 40k army im looking to venture into something new.

sooooo...

1) how big are the armies models wise?

2) how smoothly does the game play? are there mainly fiddly and/or redundant rules? or is it a semi perfectly honed wargaming machine?

3) how balanced is it? Ive heard that it is terribly inbalanced in that the "good" characters are always going to win.

4) on a tactical level how much is there to poke around with? Im assuming the WHF rules for psycholog and manouvering are there yes?

any information you can give me is very much appreciated

Pertinax
18-04-2007, 19:42
1) how big are the armies models wise?

2) how smoothly does the game play? are there mainly fiddly and/or redundant rules? or is it a semi perfectly honed wargaming machine?

3) how balanced is it? Ive heard that it is terribly inbalanced in that the "good" characters are always going to win.

4) on a tactical level how much is there to poke around with? Im assuming the WHF rules for psycholog and manouvering are there yes?

any information you can give me is very much appreciated

This chap says the following.
1: There is a limit to the number of figures in the game when you play points match ups. Up to 500 points, you have a cap of 50. Over that (Iirc up to 1000 pts), there is a 70 figure cap.

2: It is a very streamlined system, with almost no redundancy. The closest you get to that is the seige rules, but since those are special anyway, that doesn't matter. The game plays fast, and has a turn that keeps both players active (both players move, shoot and combat in the same turn).

3: It is wrong to say that the game is tilted towards the good heroes. In my book, it is the most balanced game that GW make (maybe apart from Bloodbowl). The problem stems from some of the scenarios, which involve heroes marching though a horde or orcs, and the points values of the scenarios being very skewed.

As a points match up game, it is very balanced. Pretty much everything has the same abilities, albeit in a different form. And it's not how powerful the figure is that solely determines what happens. Numbers and position are just as important.

Aragorn (king) for example, costs a wopping 270+ points. For that, you could have about 45 orcs. I'd put my money on the orcs. Although Aragorn would be a tough nut to crack, he can only do so much. He can help win the game, but not win it single handed. Besides, any hero (good or evil) tends to cost a lot, so it goes both ways.

4: Tactically, of the GW games, I would be so bold to say that it is the game that I find most tactically rewarding. It is a totally stand alone system from WFB and 40K. And it shows.

Bob5000
18-04-2007, 23:02
LOTR plays smoother , and is a real breath of fresh air and a change from the other systems .
Unlike WHFB or 40K each model is completely independent and does not have to maintain coherency .
There are courage rules which help keep the games quicker at larger points games as at a certain point you need to take courage tests which could rapidly deplete your army

HughbertofKhorne
18-04-2007, 23:25
if each and every model is an independant unit, doesnt the turn get a little slow?

Adept
19-04-2007, 07:33
if each and every model is an independant unit, doesnt the turn get a little slow?

Not really.

In the movement phase, the models take no more time to move than their 40K or WHFB counterparts. In most cases, they take much less time.

Pertinax
19-04-2007, 10:29
Plus the pre-measuring makes for a much less "will it reach?" thought-based game.

Osbad
20-04-2007, 12:56
Once you've got the hang of the rules and aren't having to stop to keep looking things up, then there is no reason an average 700pt game should last any longer than 90 minutes to 2 hours, easy.

Moving each model individually is no more of a drag than for 40k, and because there are less issues regarding "armour saves" and special rules, etc, the amount of dice-rolling is slightly less. And if moving is a drag, then you can always do what I've seen done in some larger games - use movement trays for some units in the earlier turns before hand-to-hand commences. It's personal preference really.

While individual models (or groups involved in the same combat) need to roll "to hit" and "to wound", it is also common practice to combine similar attacks and roll them all at the same time, then allocating hits out from a set model to speed things up. Perhaps even using different dice for picking out heroes or different weapon types or something.

Certainly, I've never really felt a game drag like it can do in other games while you are waiting for your opponent to complete his entire turn before you get to even touch your dice again!

Mars
20-04-2007, 23:01
Good characters don't really dominate the game; they can, but it's pretty easy to deal with them.

One way is by pinning them with ordinary troopers. Paying 6 points per turn to keep a 100+ points model bussy is quite cheap.

Or much more fun, and the reason why all Good characters in my area have a short life span: magic. Evil magic is specially designed to take out Good enemy heroes. A few turns of good casting will kill any Good hero there is (I've taken out Treebeard in single turn of combat that way).

Kasrkin-238
21-04-2007, 11:57
As said above heroes are not unbalanced and can be dealt with, especially when the Evil team has a Ringwraith and a Troll of some form working together. Mars also gives a very good tactic for the Evil side above.

LOTR's armies i find to be very easy to collect because of there, usually, smaller size. Though i use an Elf army, so the troops are high cost.

The turn system i find to be one of the best things about the game, which i think makes it much more enjoyable and tactical. If you have the rules play some very small skirmishes of say 200pts to get used to it and then move up through the points.

I would also ignore the Legions of Middle Earth books rules limiting army size etc... when you start and just play the game. Maybe doing some of the scenarios if you have any.