Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: History and evolution of Warhammer 40.000?

  1. #1

    History and evolution of Warhammer 40.000?

    Hedgehobbit gave me the idea for this topic.

    What i want here isnīt as much a history of Warhammer 40Ks fluff as it is now, but more its evolution through the different editions.

    An example from what iīve heard Chaos wasnīt even present in the very first W40k edition Rouge trader. It wasnīt before later it was added.

    Same with the Primarchs in the game Chaos Gate they are just refereed to as space marine lords, so when was that bit changed into primarchs? And so forth.

    So hopefully through this threat we can give a clear picture of when and with what edition, the different races was added and how their fluff changed over time.

  2. #2
    Librarian MasterGideon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    London
    Posts
    486

    Re: History and evolution of Warhammer 40.000?

    2nd to 3rd Edition is when history and lore was evolved I think I remember. I used to own the Rogue Trader, 40k Compendium and Ere We Go (1st ork codex) they all pretty much mention the founding of the history, so Big E, Horus Hersey etc.

    Mastergideon

  3. #3

    Re: History and evolution of Warhammer 40.000?

    Quote Originally Posted by Erikjust View Post
    Hedgehobbit gave me the idea for this topic.

    What i want here isnīt as much a history of Warhammer 40Ks fluff as it is now, but more its evolution through the different editions.

    An example from what iīve heard Chaos wasnīt even present in the very first W40k edition Rouge trader. It wasnīt before later it was added.

    Same with the Primarchs in the game Chaos Gate they are just refereed to as space marine lords, so when was that bit changed into primarchs? And so forth.

    So hopefully through this threat we can give a clear picture of when and with what edition, the different races was added and how their fluff changed over time.
    I don't recall dates off the top of my head; see www.gamehobby.net for help there.

    Warhammer 40,000 Rogue Trader was released as a Sci Fi skirmish game, ideally played with a GM moderator as well as the players. Really, one of the closest analogues in GW's stable today is a cross between Inquisitor and Necromunda. The majority of the rulebook ws background material, but it was suggested that this was optional - players should feel free to simply use the rules for whatever setting they wanted (an approach used today by Ground Zero Games, Ad Astra Games' Squadron Strike and Ambush Alley Games' Tomorrow's War, among others). Initially, the game featured the Imperium of Man, beset by the Ork empires, Eldar raiders, various human and abhuman "renegade" powers, the degenerate remnants of the old Slann and the Tyranid Hive Fleets (yes, they were in it from the start. They used the same weapon stats - bolters,lasguns, etc - as everyone else, but they were still organic, living weapons). There were several different Warp creatures described, such as Enslavers, Psychneuin and demons (generic "wings, tail, horns" demons, no mention of the Powers of Chaos yet), as well as a goodly selection of monsters, animals and various deadly plants.

    The book also contained a lengthy campaign/scenario generator, with various different scenario types (pirate raids, defensive actions, all-out battles, etc) and rules for permanent injuries, as now found in Necromunda etc.

    Really, the core of the setting was all in that book - humanity is (mostly) united under the nearly-dead Emperor, the Space Marines are the vanguard of His armies, although the Army is the vast majority of the soldiers of the Imperium. Orks are the most numerous foe, although their fractious nature means they're usually an annoyance, not a major threat. Everything else simply nibbles round the edges.

    There are single mentions of the phrases "Primarchs", "Eye of Terror" and "Horus Heresy" ("Primarch" is a title awarded to a legendary hero of a Chapter, the "Eye of Terror" is a region which is only occasionally accessible - a sort of Mad Max-esque Brigadoon in space, where the Imperium tries to crack down every twenty years or so and the "Horus Heresy" was a rebellion some time ago.

    The Horus Heresy was first expanded upon in Adeptus Titanicus - as a way of making the game a civil war so the same expensive moulds for plastic kits could be used for both sides. That game - and Space Marine were set during the Heresy, so both sides used the same kit - no Chaos Marines yet. They came later, when the first of the Realms of Chaos books - Slaves To Darkness - was published.

    In the meantime, we got proper army lists for Space Marines, Imperial Guard, Squats and Eldar Harlequins published in White Dwarf magazines over the next couple of years.

    Slaves To Darkness detailed Khorne and Slaanesh for Warhammer, Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay and Warhammer 40,000. In the 40K section, we got complete army lists for World Eaters, Emperor's Children, Black legion and Grey Knights. All of those were basically organised like a "codex" Marine Chapter - Tactical, Assault and Devastator Marines, Commanders, Chaplains, Techmarines and Librarians (even the World Eaters - they simply didn't use their psychic powers), with some unique goodies thrown in (like Ordo Malleus Inquisitors using daemon weapons with bound daemons, for example - cost 1,200 points for the weapn, but you could summon a Bloodthirster if you were lucky - or get possessed by Nurglings if you were unlucky). The second book, The Lost and the Damned turned up later, and gave us the story of the Emperor's birth and rise to power, the Great Crusade, the Heresy and the final confrontation on Horus' battle barge. The army lists were slightly different, though; rather than Death Guard and Thousand Sons, we got Nurgle Renegades and Tzeentch Renegades, which were "grab-bags" of all the Chaos gribblies with a single unit entry for Plague Marines or Thousand Sons, as appropriate.

    The Orks got written up in Waaagh! The Orks (which was purely background - no rules at all!), 'Ere We Go and Freebooterz. The Craftworld Eldar turned up in White Dwarf, as did Terminators and Genestealer Cults.

    Later additions, which dribbled in until 2nd edition came out, included the Battle for Armageddon game and its Chaos Attack expansion, which described the Second and then First Armageddon Wars, the Horus Heresy boardgame which detailed the Seige of the Imperial Palace and Doom of the Eldar, which told us how Iyanden got gutted by Hive Fleet Kraken. The "Native Americans in space" aspect of the Dark Angels was brought in from Space Hulk's Deathwing expansion (before 2nd edition decided to change it once Bill King had safely left the building) and the Genestealer expansion gave us Grey Knight Terminators and Nemesis Force Weapons. Tyranids got a proper army list (in an experimental, never-to-be repeated format) and the Space Wolves were totally rewritten to get their current character late in Rogue Trader days.

    2nd edition didn't really add anything groundbreaking. We got some new elements to the backstory - like the Blood Angels and Dark angels background, the Iron Warriors, Night Lords, Alpha Legion and Word Bearers getting some background (originally, they were followers of Slaanesh, Khorne, Slaanesh and Khorne, repsectively, and had no background bar a couple of shoulder pad designs in the Realm of Chaos books). The Raven Guard got a mention, and we went from three to two lost legions (and in fact, the term "Legion" was introduced for the original Great Crusade Marine organisations).

    The words used changed; 1st edition was quite happy with "computer", "cyborg", etc - 2nd editon started to introduce "cogitator" and "servitor" to give the whole product more of a consistently gothic feel - although the bright colours of the studio miniatures did tend to counteract that. The game itself had grown in scope - now the standard game was a reinforces platoon; 30 to 50 men with perhaps a couple of light vehicles and a tank.

    Necrons popped up (in the background as well as in real life) towards the end of 2nd edition - in fact, they appeared so late that the 2nd edition stats had to be reverse-engineered from the 3rd edition stats, as they'd been developed alongside 3rd edition.

    From 3rd edition onwards someone else can pick up the story - I sort of lost interest around that time.

  4. #4
    Brother Sergeant
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Kingston upon Hull
    Posts
    71

    Re: History and evolution of Warhammer 40.000?

    Wow thats a good sumary I can't dive in with third edition all I want to add is Leman Russ first appered in the Rogue trader book as a Space marine commander no mention of Primarch hood yet it was all so simple back then.

  5. #5
    Inquisitor Lord Damocles's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Birmingham, UK
    Posts
    8,703

    Re: History and evolution of Warhammer 40.000?

    Quote Originally Posted by Erikjust View Post
    Same with the Primarchs in the game Chaos Gate they are just refereed to as space marine lords, so when was that bit changed into primarchs? And so forth.
    Primarchs pre-date Chaos Gate by a loooong time.

    Refering to them as Lords:
    a) sounds cooler in context (the campaign intoduction)
    b) is less likely to confuse those who have no idea who these Ultramarine guys are, or why they're fighing etc.
    c) is still a perfectly valid description of them

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •